Age Pension income and assets thresholds revised

Revised income and assets test thresholds will take effect from 1 July.

Age Pension income and assets thresholds revised

The Department of Social Services has released revised income and assets test thresholds for the Age Pension to take effect from 1 July 2019.

Australians of Age Pension age can receive some income – from such areas as investments, property rental or salary – and receive an Age Pension. However, there are disqualifying limits.

From 1 July, a single can receive $174 per fortnight (up from $172), a couple combined and an illness-separated couple combined $308 per fortnight (up from $304).

The new disqualifying income limit for singles is $2026.40 (up from $2024.40), for couples combined $3100.40 (up from $3096.40) and for illness-separated couples combined $4012.80 (up from $4008.80).

Exceeding the fortnightly income limit will see the Age Pension reduced by 50 cents for every $1 over the limit, until the disqualification limit for a part Age Pension is reached, at which point the Age Pension payment will cease.

The assets test thresholds have also been adjusted, to take effect from 1 July.

These limits are used to determine qualification for an Age Pension and the rate at which that will be paid.

The asset-free areas to qualify for a full Age Pension (homeowners): singles can have assets to the value of $263,250 (up from $258,500) – an increase of $4750; couples combined and illness-separated couples $394,500 (up from $387,500) – an increase of $7000.

The asset-free areas to qualify for a full Age Pension (non-homeowners): singles can have assets to the value of $473,750 (up from $465,500) – an increase of $8250; couples combined and illness-separated couples combined $605,000 (up from $594,500) – an increase of $10,500.

The asset-free areas to qualify for a full Age Pension for retirement village and granny flat residents are: $210,500 (up from $207,000) – an increase of $3500.

The new disqualifying asset limits for single homeowners are $572,000 (up from $567,250) – an increase of $4750, and for single non-homeowners $782,500 (up from $774,250) – an increase of $8250.

For couple combined homeowners: $860,000 (up from $853,000) – an increase of $7000.

For couple combined non-homeowners: $1,070,500 (up from $1,060,000) – an increase of $10,500.

Will the new thresholds make a difference to your retirement income?

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    COMMENTS

    To make a comment, please register or login
    thommo
    26th Jun 2019
    10:08am
    What a joke...Just bring in a universal pension and stop this nonsense.
    ozrog
    26th Jun 2019
    10:53am
    Agree
    johnp
    26th Jun 2019
    11:03am
    Agree 100% thommo. Govt doesn't realise they will actually save themselves money with a universal aged pension
    TREBOR
    26th Jun 2019
    11:07am
    Spot on - now for the nuts and bolts... generally any politician who hears such talk goes nuts and bolts...

    In this case the nuts and bolts I speak of are how income etc above pension will be treated.... including superannuation....
    Old Geezer
    26th Jun 2019
    11:13am
    Agree and it becomes a debt on your estate when you die.
    Karl Marx
    26th Jun 2019
    11:41am
    OG is like centrelink, broken & talking out his blurter again. Why should an entitlement like the pension become a debt OG, I really believe you live in lala land.
    If a universal pension was introduced like that in NZ & other developed countries then those with an income from shares, investments, proprty etc would then pay their fair share of tax.
    No complex Centrelink that would save the government billions in admin costs, 99.9% rort free, no more robodebt & the government will get more revenue from taxes especially from the wealthy. Big win win for the government.
    libsareliars
    26th Jun 2019
    12:07pm
    Spot on thommo
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    12:17pm
    thommo, why a Universal Pension? There is seriously something wrong with someone if they own a house and have more than a half a million in savings and want the pension.

    Australia is in the biggest deficit ever and you want a Universal Pension. Be grateful for what you have. It’s not like you are financially poor.
    casey
    26th Jun 2019
    1:26pm
    Jackie, many other countries have a universal pension scheme. As a matter of fact when Prince Charles was 65 he became elligible for the age pension. Although good on him he asked for it to be donated to charities.
    GeorgeM
    26th Jun 2019
    2:07pm
    Exactly, thommo, this should not even be debated now (other than the minimum rules) with the Broken Age Pension system we have. Good points, SFR. jackie needs to get out of the discrimination mentality which has put retirees against each other - something which Labor and Liberals have achieved over many decades, yet with BOTH attacking retirees.
    Retirees, being 20% of the electorate, need to speak with one voice (other than selfish weirdos such as OG - forget them) and force sensible change which benefits the country and retirees - a win-win for all.
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    4:21pm
    casey, Britain does not have a Universal Pension. Prince Charles has been a welfare sponger all his life. The Royal Family are all paid by taxpayers which have always cost more than a pension.

    The governments of New Zealand, Mauritius, Namibia, Botswana, Bolivia, Nepal, Samoa, Brunei, Kosovo, and Mexico City provide a basic pension to the elderly with no test other than citizenship, residence, and age.

    They manage because the pension is a lot less than ours and those countries are not full of the rich bleeding them dry.
    Triss
    26th Jun 2019
    5:57pm
    Must agree with you, Jackie, for example, Turnbull, Abbott and all the ex politicians who have fleeced taxpayers for decades. They have huge pensions and highly paid jobs but their pensions are not cut. Also it has not been taxpayers who have racked up the debt so that shouldn’t stop a universal pension.
    casey
    26th Jun 2019
    5:57pm
    Jackie, are you a reincarnation of Lothario? You appear to know an awful lot about nothing.
    UK does have a universal pension system, it is not means tested. My wife and I have lived in Australia for over 50 years, yet we still get a part age pension from the UK. As for Charles being a welfare sponger. How do you figure that? As I mentioned although he is entitled to an age pension he does not take it. IT GOES TO CHARITY. And no I am not a royalist by any means. So Going by some of your other comments on this site I suggest you get some reading glasses so you can properly read the comments before making more of an arse of yourself with some of your comments.
    TREBOR
    26th Jun 2019
    6:48pm
    No way, O-G-ey.. pension will never become a burden on the estate of the poor.
    Old Geezer
    26th Jun 2019
    7:44pm
    Many poor now live in $1 million plus houses.
    Thoughtful
    27th Jun 2019
    12:18am
    Transitional arrangements Trebor. Been done before.
    Hoohoo
    27th Jun 2019
    1:18pm
    There's no need for crude language here, Casey, regarding Jackie's comment about the Royal Family.
    Is it not true the UK Government pays the Royals a very large allowance (from revenue - tax-payer's contributions)? I wouldn't call this welfare, as the Royals are obliged to carry out duties as part of the deal, but in reality, they don't have to do anything for it if they don't want to. The Royals also create a lot of income for the UK through tourism, mainly from grovelling little ex-colonials like Australians.
    To get welfare like the dole you need to jump through copious amounts of red tape, judgement & stumbling blocks. I haven't ever applied for a Pension, but everything I hear about Centrelink's understaffed treatment of pensioners is quite frightening. If you're lucky enough to find a decent customer service officer then it seems a lot easier to navigate, but if you cop an over-worked, under-trained officer you can be given not only bad, but false advice, & find yourself swimming in a torrent of blame & difficulty, having to wait months & months before you receive your due pension.
    Hoohoo
    27th Jun 2019
    1:22pm
    BTW, Jackie sounds NOTHING like Lothario!

    On the other hand, is Casey new to this site?
    casey
    27th Jun 2019
    3:29pm
    No, However are you I have never seen a post from you before Hoohoo
    Anonymous
    27th Jun 2019
    5:40pm
    for a homeowning couple with a million dollars in the bank they will get ..on current interest rates ...say 2.5%...an income of $25,000 a year...which is a lot less than a married couple on a full pension (and they do not get a concession card either)...so it is ridiculous to say they are rich...they are in fact behind those on the full pension...i.e. $36,301 per year...a difference of of $11,301 per annum.

    please correct me if I am wrong
    casey
    27th Jun 2019
    6:50pm
    Spot on Ardnaher. They also miss out on discounted rates, utilities and car registration.
    If you have paid all your taxes etc you should be entitled as in New zealand and UK to an age pension and the entitlements.
    Anonymous
    28th Jun 2019
    6:00pm
    so my advice to anyone about to retire...buy the most expensive house you can afford and go on the aged pension. the only people who will do ok are those who have added to their superfund and have a good amount built up...they can get a pension from that and get a top up from the government if they work it right (and also the pension concession card). dont be fools and save up and have a couple of million in the bank...you will be penalised.
    Farside
    28th Jun 2019
    7:41pm
    Ardnaher, your hypothetical homeowning couple with a million dollars is only behind those on the full pension if they solely rely upon the bank interest earned. Rearranging their affairs to qualify for the pension is not bad advice in these circumstances but the obvious solution to their cashflow challenge is to use seek out the sweet spot and spend some of their capital to purchase an annuity and top up their pensions. Won't hear peep from them when interest rates are once again generating higher returns but in the mean time they should not expect the taxpayer to preserve their capital in the bank.
    Hoohoo
    29th Jun 2019
    4:35pm
    casey, I've taken a break for about 3 weeks!

    Yes, Farside - you'd be nuts to rely on bank interest rates for an income. Better to invest in bank shares because their profits just keep going up & up!
    Triss
    1st Jul 2019
    4:34pm
    Old Geezer, we live in a democracy so if the pension has to be paid back on death then so must all the favours you have had in the past. Hospital, surgeons tax relief, etc.
    Triss
    1st Jul 2019
    4:39pm
    Jackie, there is seriously something wrong but let’s look at ex politicians first. Multi millionaire ex politicians with multiple houses- Rudd, Keating, etc who will be joined by Turnbull and cronies let’s cut their pensions first.
    Nan Norma
    26th Jun 2019
    10:48am
    Need a realistic deeming rate. Thommo is so right.
    ozrog
    26th Jun 2019
    10:53am
    Agree
    ozrog
    26th Jun 2019
    10:52am
    And then there's the Deeming rates still 3.24% the government needs to bring them in line as well.
    TREBOR
    26th Jun 2019
    11:09am
    Never happen - any government worth its salt could never give up an opportunity to give with one tiny fingertip and take with both hands...
    older&wiser
    26th Jun 2019
    11:17am
    PLUS is deemed to earn interest from $1. Many pensioners have money in an 'every day' account that pays zilch. So are effectively penalised. Should be a buffer amount of around $20,000 - then deeming rate should be as per RBA.
    Karl Marx
    26th Jun 2019
    11:45am
    Would be far better for the government to legislate that banks had to offer deeming accounts that paid interested at the deeming rate of the day. But that won't happen either.
    TREBOR
    26th Jun 2019
    11:06am
    "From 1 July, a single can receive $174 per fortnight (up from $172), a couple combined and an illness-separated couple combined $308 per fortnight (up from $304).

    The new disqualifying income limit for singles is $2026.40 (up from $2024.40), for couples combined $3100.40 (up from $3096.40) and for illness-separated couples combined $4012.80 (up from $4008.80)."

    Very kind - does it take into account the same bracket creep as apparently warrants reduction in the income tax rate for the fattest in the land?

    I've no idea what I'll do with that princely extra $2 ...... trip to Acapulco..... ski Aspen ...tour the Himalayas .... South America and the Andes ... buy a castle from an impoverished laird in Scotland??
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    11:15am
    Look at the bright side - they could have reduced the pension by $2. With the asset allowance increase, does that mean we can have more deemed money in the bank than before?
    casey
    26th Jun 2019
    11:21am
    You could save the $2-00 each week Trebor. In 3weeks you would have enough for a coffee. Thats if you have enough for petrol to get there.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    11:31am
    casey - the $2 is for the fortnight so Trebor would have to save 6 weeks for that coffee.
    hahaha
    KSS
    26th Jun 2019
    12:35pm
    Where do you live that coffee costs $6?
    Bushbaby
    26th Jun 2019
    1:05pm
    A smallish coffee costs at least $5 where I live and the latte that I favour (when I can afford anything that is) is upward of $6.
    Alexii
    26th Jun 2019
    2:39pm
    We usually buy a coffee from either 711 or Shell as it costs only $1. Mu ch better than paying anything up to $5 or so as we consider such coffees are too expensive for us. We use our own mugs so that we don't add to the environmental waste problem.
    TREBOR
    26th Jun 2019
    6:50pm
    I brew my own - buy the kilo bags on special and hold a feast of different kinds of coffee - like Starbucks but better... for visitors on the road I offer Colombian to keep them awake... as long as they get past the drug testers....

    26th Jun 2019
    11:12am
    So much for the often repeated claim that your home is not assessed. It is to the tune of $209'500. Sometimes I wonder whether living in a expensive mobile home would not be more advantageous to living in a home unit. You could have more assets in a mobile home, or am I wrong there?
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    12:28pm
    Cowboy Jim, caravan parks charge high rents and land developers have been snapping them up. Security is more important than money.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    3:14pm
    You are right jackie about the fees. But you would get $65 a week rent assistance out of the $180 site fee. At the moment I am paying $2300 body corp and $2200 council rates a year and no assistance. And who says mobile homes are always on a fee paying caravan site? Lots of people park anywhere near council owned toilet/shower blocks near me and use all the "free" facilities available to them. Ratepayers like us are paying for them. When you live on the coastal strip you can see plenty of free-loaders doing exactly what I outlined above.
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    5:08pm
    Cowboy Jim, why live like a derelict. They would only be allowed to stay temporarily at the free sites.

    Turn the place into a B&B for a couple of weeks a year. You are allowed to earn $7,000 a year I guess, without affecting the pension.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    5:42pm
    You've probably never seen a $170'000 mobile home, nothing derelict about that. Everything you have in a unit is there including shower/toilet, pay TV etc. Certainly not thinking about a bubble nana van from 1958, lol.
    london
    26th Jun 2019
    11:13am
    MP,s get a huge pay increase and pensioners nil
    When is the government look after the welfare of pensioners
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    12:47pm
    london, the entire country needs to address the MP's salaries and perks to be revised. New Zealand's PM had the decency not to take a pay rise but our PM certainly did.
    Alexii
    26th Jun 2019
    2:45pm
    In this whole issue of tax reductions there is never a mention, by politicians or media, that there ought to be an increase in pensions nor is there mention of the fact the tax reductions are of little or no benefit to those people who are on minimal incomes eg below or just above the tax threshold. Obviously all these people are of no value to th economy and should be ignored as much as possible. Of course they do not recognise that fact that those on pensions and minimal incomes have a high propensity to consume and therefor tend to spend every extra $ they may get whereas those on the higher incomes that will get an extra $10K in tex reductions have a high propensity to save (they already have more than enough for their spending) so they just add to their investments.
    AutumnOz
    26th Jun 2019
    11:21am
    Generous aren't they? NOT.
    I see property rental listed in the article as a source of income...does anyone know where a property can be rented for $308 per fortnight?
    These changes are ridiculous.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    11:29am
    Even a room above an old pub is $180 a week around here, no food included!
    AutumnOz
    26th Jun 2019
    3:58pm
    And the food would be expensive even if only for one restaurant meal per day.
    Years ago people could get a room for a week at a reasonable price but those days are long gone.
    Karl Marx
    26th Jun 2019
    11:29am
    Wow, splurge time, thank you Australian government for looking after OAP with soooooo much dignity. All we need now is a fair go and to fix a system that's not only extremely complex but basically broken
    Mad as Hell
    26th Jun 2019
    11:39am
    The LNP and Greens stole part pensioners assets with the 2017 changes to the Pensioner Assets Test based on lies and broken promises.
    Claiming to save $2.5 billion over five years for the budget emergency.
    Now the LNP want to pass $158 billion in tax cuts over ten years mostly benefiting high income income earners who already get and keep getting tax breaks through negative gearing, franking credits, discretionary trusts, etc.
    Return the income and assets test to pre 2017 limits the present taper rate is too harsh.
    The old age pension is an entitlement if one qualifies.
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    12:54pm
    Mad as Hell, The Age Pension is welfare according to the Morrison.

    The NLP has always been there to make the rich get richer by taking away from the poor. Labor wanted to close that gap up a bit but Australians didn't want that.

    Now we all have to suffer for the next three years or more again.
    GeorgeM
    26th Jun 2019
    2:23pm
    You are quite right, Mad as Hell. It has often been clarified that age pension is an entitlement paid for over decades by the extra 7.5% included in personal income tax.
    The priority now MUST be Universal Age Pension before ANY tax cuts for the wealthy. Hey, the Budget emergency is now replaced by Budget Surpluses hereafter, so it is time to at least retract the nasty Asset Test changes first before any other actions!

    The Morrison tax cuts plan to give $11,640 tax cuts to all with income of $200K and above from 2024 (not sure what more detail Albo wants, just a pretext to look like he is opposing while sitting on the fence licking their lips, as they did for the Asset Test changes in 2015, very hypocritical). This benefits all Federal politicians as backbenchers get over $207K Base Salary. No wonder the greed factor is working so hard to get the tax cuts through in Canberra with the cross-benches clearly unable to pass up on this magnificent windfall for themselves.
    TREBOR
    26th Jun 2019
    6:53pm
    jackie - Morrison always was a village idiot when it comes to simple realities...
    Hoohoo
    27th Jun 2019
    1:34pm
    TREBOR, Morrison is definitely not an idiot - he's very clever. However, he uses the dumb dad image to conceal his greed & deceptive tactics. AND, he gets away with it very well. I refer you to the results of the last election.
    DanielTech
    26th Jun 2019
    11:39am
    The increases to the OAP are absolutely pathetic. The cost of living has gone up by much more than the amount of the increase. I see that there is no mention of changing the deeming rate on savings and other assets that can receive a return on their value.
    Triss
    1st Jul 2019
    9:43pm
    The increases are an abuse, DanielTech, pollies have given themselves a raise of 2% which is a lot morethan OAP and they’ll get another slug from the tax cuts.

    26th Jun 2019
    11:40am
    well I got a 50c increase in veteran pension meanwhile NSW polls just got from $10k to $100k extra due to "committee work" fair dinkum and earlier this month federal polls got a 2% rise that meant PM got an extra $11k per year and even a back bencher got $3 to $4k extra per year.
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    12:50pm
    bob menzies, New Zealand's PM knocked back an $11,000 pay increase. There is too much greed in Australia. That's why the class division is widening.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    3:20pm
    Stop comparing us to NZ at every opportunity, jackie. It is a free country and you can move over there any time you like. I know the place quite well and I'd rather live here than there. Just because the NZ Prime Minister at present is a soft-hearted Socialist does not alter the fact cost of living expenses are far higher than here. Just think of the GST of 15% on EVERYTHING not like Meg Lees's exemptions on fresh produce. Just stay over there for a month or so!
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    4:10pm
    having been to NZ 4 times in past 3 years I could not agree more with Cowboy Jim
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    4:28pm
    Cowboy Jim, Australian politicians should stop taking pay rises while this country's economy is down.

    I am comparing us to New Zealand because their Government has the decency to stop bleeding the people. Ours doesn't.

    No, I will not go there because I am an Australian, not a sellout. I have had some lovely holidays in New Zealand and hold a lot of respect for our ANZACS.
    TREBOR
    26th Jun 2019
    6:55pm
    Hears a magnificent statement on radio yesterday - '(as a nation) we look after our Veterans better when they're dead than when they're still alive"...
    Tricky
    26th Jun 2019
    12:10pm
    The government is to frightened to touch 'Deeming rates' on Term Deposits.
    Bren
    26th Jun 2019
    1:31pm
    Any adjustments to deeming rates (unlikely) or deeming thresholds ?
    Bren
    26th Jun 2019
    1:31pm
    Any adjustments to deeming rates (unlikely) or deeming thresholds ?
    ronnieb
    26th Jun 2019
    1:43pm
    To all you people who are whingeing about the OAP being miserable i wonder how many of you voted for the LNP in the last election? Tax rorts for anybody earning anything over $200k is about to be made law while others worry about a miserable pittance earned with franking credits.
    What you sow you shall reap.
    AutumnOz
    26th Jun 2019
    4:06pm
    ronnieb I certainly didn't vote for the LNP and so far I haven't met anyone who admits to voting for them.
    I was quite shocked when the results of the election came out, now I'm stuck with a government that will not do anything for OAPs or the disabled for another three years.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    4:13pm
    I voted for coalition and would so again - far better option than Shorten. I remain convinced the country would be much worse under a labor government - until another Hawke comes along labor may well struggle - this does not mean coalition are good just not as bad as the alternative
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    4:38pm
    ronnieb, I certainly didn't vote for NLP and agree that franking credits are nothing but a tax rort for the greedy well off. Greed can never satisfy the rich.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    4:49pm
    Agree with bob menzies about Hawke (workers ALP, not Elites of today). jackie - franking credits are paid for when the shares were bought and some people take risks. We all had franking credits when we were in super. I think you just do not understand the principle of finance. No, I do not own any but do have friends who rely on them and therefore do not claim any age pension and that was the purpose of super and shareholding in the first place when Hawke/Keating brought it in: to eventually wean us off the OAP.
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    5:14pm
    Cowboy Jim, Hawke/Keating had no intention of weaning Australians off the OAP. You have mistaken that for the Liberal Government that's been threatening all for the past six years with it.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    9:37pm
    Jackie - your not quite correct - in 1991 Keating said he hoped that superannuation would ultimately reduce the burden of the aged pension - he could see where we were heading - living longer and son on.
    Cowboy Jim is absolutely correct re franking credits My first degree is finance so I speak with some knowledge on the subject.
    gerry
    26th Jun 2019
    1:51pm
    why bother to save all your life and then be no better off than some flat slob who,s boozed and smoked and had 10kids while being on the dole
    My neighbour is going into a care home and will be deemed as paying for her keep while the woman in the next room will have everything paid by for the state
    Thoughtful
    26th Jun 2019
    2:20pm
    And this is the problem. NO incentive to save, especially if you are never going to achieve an income the same as the OAP. A UAP would fix this immediately. It is not about wanting more - it is actually the most viable economical solution for the country. There have always and will always be the haves and the have nots - for many reasons and not necessarily due to each individuals' savings habits. Agree - take into account the rorting of the current system, the huge costs of administering it and the net gain in taxes and the country is better off.
    Thoughtful
    26th Jun 2019
    2:23pm
    Many other benefits to society I can think of as well. And we don't even need to touch MP's money to achieve this so they should be happy as well.
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    4:50pm
    gerry, stop gloating on others that have been less fortunate than you.

    All people in care homes pay money even the ones with nothing. Their entire pension is taken from them and they have fewer privileges than the ones with money.

    Families only visit those that have something to leave to them not those that don't.
    TREBOR
    26th Jun 2019
    6:58pm
    It's enough to drive you to drink, jerry - I always knew politicians had some good in them....
    Suze
    27th Jun 2019
    12:09pm
    Spot on Gerry
    gerry
    26th Jun 2019
    1:51pm
    why bother to save all your life and then be no better off than some flat slob who,s boozed and smoked and had 10kids while being on the dole
    My neighbour is going into a care home and will be deemed as paying for her keep while the woman in the next room will have everything paid by for the state
    see all.Maryakate
    26th Jun 2019
    6:39pm
    Gerry, I think everyone who enters an aged care facility has to pay. Some pay from their pension other pay from their savings. Some have health card while others pay full price. But regardless of the fat slob who boozes and has 10 kids, that's a bit unnecessary as the poor coot would have a lot of worry feeding and clothing his kids. If all those who have worked all their life but end up on the pension, you would need to ask why? Bad managers, too many meals out, coffee on Sunday? then do up their house with their super, take trip round Aust. in the new SUV and caravan, then register for the pension.
    Paddington
    1st Jul 2019
    4:44pm
    Judgmental much!
    Misty
    1st Jul 2019
    5:48pm
    You could say the same about all those rich folk who employ accountants to hide their money so the don't have to pay tax and still get a part pension, just saying.
    gerry
    26th Jun 2019
    2:05pm
    re coffee shop:: two of my fav shops have closed in one week in Cairns,,,They couldn't pay the penalty rates ,reckoned that they earnt less than the staff.

    Montgomery was in my local p/o drawing his pension and didn't like the way the owner, had slapped the money onto the desk,He fumed that he had paid into it all his life and told them to have a go at the Queen cos she drew hers too
    TREBOR
    26th Jun 2019
    6:59pm
    They pay penalty rates on week days.. well, I never....
    Hoohoo
    27th Jun 2019
    1:53pm
    The Liberal Party had Sunday penalty rates abolished, gerry. I think these business people are telling you porkies. And why wouldn't you close on the weekend, or simply do the work yourself, rather than pay extra staff, before shutting down your business?

    That's what I've had to do in my manufacturing business, now cheap Chinese imports have reduced our income to 40% of what it was 10 years ago. We can't afford to pay staff so we do all the ho-hum basket-weaving ourselves, as well as run all the other aspects of our business like marketing, admin, financials & artwork, that we've always done.
    gerry
    26th Jun 2019
    2:05pm
    re coffee shop:: two of my fav shops have closed in one week in Cairns,,,They couldn't pay the penalty rates ,reckoned that they earnt less than the staff.

    Montgomery was in my local p/o drawing his pension and didn't like the way the owner, had slapped the money onto the desk,He fumed that he had paid into it all his life and told them to have a go at the Queen cos she drew hers too
    Sen.Cit.90
    26th Jun 2019
    3:55pm
    HI Gerry,
    I was in the UK many years ago when I read of Field Marshal Montgomery in the Post Office drawing his pension that he was fully entitled to. I don't remember any other details.
    I would also support a Universal Pension Scheme.
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    4:58pm
    Sen.Cit.90, a Universal pension will not wipe out poverty. It would be a lot less than ours. Here is information on them.

    http://www.pension-watch.net/social-pensions-database/social-pensions-around-the-world/
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    8:10pm
    Thanks for the link jackie - had a look at it, lived in quite a few of those places. Still when considering what is spent on pensioners in Australia in GDP costs we are doing quite well. Of course when looking to Africa etc the figures are really out of order. All being said - we are doing OK here because we also give money to people who never put in. That is certainly not the case in most of the places where I have lived.
    Not a Bludger
    26th Jun 2019
    2:12pm
    Should be a universal pension for all with 20 plus years of tax paying and with a sliding scale reduction for more recent arrivals.
    Added benefit is that it would get DSS/Centrelink out of the way.
    Thoughtful
    26th Jun 2019
    2:27pm
    This country needs a rethink and a shift in principles no longer valid for today's world . And that means at the individual level as well.
    Ginaus
    26th Jun 2019
    3:59pm
    When will these mongrels ever stop fcking around with the pension.. why dont they stuff around the politician's pension... stop it all together....
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    4:59pm
    Ginaus, I agree.
    Ginaus
    26th Jun 2019
    3:59pm
    When will these mongrels ever stop fcking around with the pension.. why dont they stuff around the politician's pension... stop it all together....
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    4:17pm
    well they have - since 2007 no politician entering parliament gets a pension until they turn 60 - yes they then get a better deal than almost everyone else - but not greatly so - the only politicians getting a life time pension are those that entered parliament before 2007. the same applies to all state parliaments.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    4:52pm
    Should have to wait till they're 67 like the rest of us.
    jackie
    26th Jun 2019
    5:02pm
    Cowboy Jim and theirs should be means tested too. Considering many are millionaires and move on to other high paying jobs like what Hockey has done.
    Anonymous
    26th Jun 2019
    9:40pm
    it is possible for all of us to take a superannuation annuity tax free from age 60 and retired. Of course one has to be financially in a good place to do this. This is different to OAP.
    I retired at 60 because I had significant super money plus a defined benefit pension and was financially set up for retirement.
    Thoughtful
    27th Jun 2019
    12:13am
    The magic words bob menzies - defined benefit pension. The reason I advised my children to seek employment with the government and the reason I wish my father had done the same for me. Better job security too back then. Hind sight is a wonderful thing - makes you realise how stupid you have been. Or just plain uneducated outside of your field.
    THE FORGOTTEN
    28th Jun 2019
    4:02pm
    Well said Ginaus.
    When oh when is this Politicians Pension rort going to be seriously tackled. If they are working after leaving politics why are they allowed to still get a Pension. ARE WE PENSIONERS ALLOWED THE ENORMOUS PAYMENTS TAX FREE AFTER CEASING WORK,AND ALLOWED TO CLAIM IT THE DAY AFTER THEY LEAVE OFFICE. THE RECENT SPATE OF POLITICIANS ONLY LEFT TO MAKE USE OF THEIR PENSION RORTS.


    WAKE UP AUSTRALIA...MAKE POLITICIANS OPERATE UNDER THE SAME PENSION RULES AS ORDINARY AUSTRALIANS WHO HAVE PAID TAX ALL THEIR LIFE. IN MY CASE 50 YEARS..
    foxylady
    26th Jun 2019
    5:45pm
    Many years ago my parents who received an aged pension got a letter from Centrelink advising that it considered them "a burden"
    vfMarky
    26th Jun 2019
    6:39pm
    This is beyond a joke - it’s an insult.
    Also, raising the penalty to 50 cents in the dollar effectively means you’re working for half the hourly rate!
    We need any work we can get to a) survive, b) to give us a sense of purpose and c) a continuing involvement in society...
    Nomad1946
    26th Jun 2019
    8:33pm
    WoW!! An increase of asset values of less than 1% .... sheitt!! ... I feel priviledged .... absolute damn Insult!!
    NGE
    26th Jun 2019
    11:22pm
    Well said Thommo. I concur
    Nan Norma
    27th Jun 2019
    12:31am
    If you were born on or after these dates you must claim the new State Pension. The earliest you can get the basic State Pension is when you reach State Pension age. To get the full basic State Pension you need a total of 30 qualifying years of National Insurance contributions or credits
    Nan Norma
    27th Jun 2019
    12:35am
    This is referring to the British age pension.
    GrayComputing
    27th Jun 2019
    7:49am
    NO ASSET TEST FOR A PENSION EVER AGAIN!
    A pension is not welfare.

    Now is the season for discontent, so do something about it!
    It is time to kill off this insane hugely expensive pensioner whacking bureaucracy.

    It is time for all of us (yes that means you) to rant at our MPs and Senators daily to take action for human decency and a huge stress reduction for pensioners

    Most economist say we will save taxpayers money by dropping asset testing because of the massive overheads cost in running Centrelink and the 10,000 conflicting rules.

    Hiring more Centrelink staff will only increase taxpayer’s costs for processing the creeping insane red tape monster system politicians and well paid bureaucrats have created.

    Help scrap it now. Become a hero.

    Even the UK and poorer New Zealand has a NO ASSET pension so it is cheaper and user friendly.

    Why worry that few million$ earners get it too. That is peanuts to them, not enough for a good vintage champagne.

    Do retired and retiring people really look forward and want 100++ visits to/from Centrelink and be part of 3 million waiting queues and lost calls?

    We all (that means you) need to tell our MP and senators every day that these criminal asset tests for a pension must be dropped now.
    Hoohoo
    27th Jun 2019
    2:02pm
    This LNP government will never do it. They prefer to continue with the class warfare between the haves & the have nots, so they can continue to squeal about "the politics of envy" by progressive proponents.

    Also, shutting down Centrelink would deny them the opportunity of punishing poor people - their favourite hobby.
    Chris B T
    27th Jun 2019
    1:40pm
    How many of You received a break down of How they Derived at Your Pension Payment/Part.
    There is no way of Knowing Of The Mathematical Wizardry Used.
    The Displayed Figures and Methods are only there for confusion.
    Years from now The "ROBBO COP" I mean Debt comes a knocking you have nothing to validate your claim.
    Fredklaus
    27th Jun 2019
    2:28pm
    less than half the percentage rate of deeming percentage
    Fredklaus
    27th Jun 2019
    2:29pm
    for the asset test
    Justsane
    29th Jun 2019
    12:58am
    http://www.pension-watch.net/social-pensions-database/social-pensions-around-the-world/
    (from Jackie) is a bit out of date - for Australia at least.
    SuziJ
    30th Jun 2019
    9:01am
    No! I don't have much in assets, just my home contents & a teenage car.
    Misty
    30th Jun 2019
    10:44am
    Google UK Universal Pension and see what comes up, very complicated, 3 different sorts of pension and seems to depend on how many years you have worked and paid into the scheme, no mention of a Universal Pension.
    Anonymous
    30th Jun 2019
    11:13am
    Quite right, when I worked in London in 1973 I had a booklet where I had to glue stamps in every week. Wonder where that book ended up, without it no part pension.
    casey
    30th Jun 2019
    12:14pm
    Cowboy Jim I came to Australia in Feb 1969. I had no stamps or paperwork but applied via
    Future Pension Centre
    Room TB218
    Tyneview Park
    Whitley Road
    Newcastle upon Tyne
    NE981BA
    I sent who I worked for and the approx dates For both my wife and myself. I was quite surprised how straightforward it was. They backdated the payments to my 65th birthday and I get payments direct to my bank acc every month.
    If you need any assistance there is a group called BPIA ( British Pensioners in Australia )
    There email is bpia@people.net.au
    Ask them any questions you have and they will help you. All the best Casey
    Anonymous
    30th Jun 2019
    8:23pm
    Thanks casey, for the info. I worked for a while in Switzerland as well and I did exactly what you suggested. Got some pension but 2 former employers do no longer exist and although I had my fees deducted they were not handed in. Pension people in Geneva said if I still had a pay advice sheet they would recognise my claim. Fat chance after almost 50 years, eh? Still I was successful getting $100 a month directly in my account down here, minus a $2.50 inward fee, whatever that is. Thanks again.
    Tricky
    1st Jul 2019
    3:06pm
    The PM Morrison and his cabinet had a prayer meeting and GOD told hem to take the pay rise.
    Hoohoo
    1st Jul 2019
    5:40pm
    How very Christian of him! These hypocrites give Jesus & god a bad name.
    Paddington
    1st Jul 2019
    5:52pm
    Ha ha, Tricky, good one!
    Tricky
    1st Jul 2019
    3:11pm
    The PM and Centrelink are going to have a prayer meeting to decide the next review of DEEMING RATES, It will be then up to Morrison and GOD aka 'Imaginary friend' to decide whether the rates will rise or fall.
    Misty
    1st Jul 2019
    5:39pm
    Don't hold your breath Tricky waiting for a change.
    Tricky
    1st Jul 2019
    7:21pm
    Thanks 'Misty', A few thoughts and prayers.
    ray from Bondi
    1st Jul 2019
    9:30pm
    all I feel is anger politicians the ultra-rich continue to gain increases far above the normal and the people who really need help a few dollars that only covers the increases in costs for the next fortnight and then it is swallowed. shame on all governments


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