4th May 2017
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Aged care abuse prompts review of processes
Author: Ben Hocking
Elderly man hiding his face

The Australian Government is commissioning an independent review of the Commonwealth’s aged care quality regulatory processes to determine why they failed to identify abuse and poor clinical care at Adelaide’s state-run Oakden nursing home.

Federal Aged Care Minister Ken Wyatt said he was shocked and concerned to hear about the mistreatment of people at the Makk and McLeay wards at the South Australian Oakden Older Persons Mental Health Service.

A South Australian Government commissioned report on the Oakden home found poor treatment and potential abuse of elderly dementia patients at the facility.

The inquiry, conducted by SA's chief psychiatrist, uncovered rough handling of patients, an excessive use of restraints, and a concerning level of injuries.

The facility is partly funded by the Federal Government. The latest inquiry also comes after a report in The Weekend Australian reported that the federal agency which oversees aged-care centres has repeatedly failed to detect shocking cases of poor care and neglect at scores of homes across the country, and in many cases had actually accredited them to continue operating.

Mr Wyatt announced the inquiry will investigate the role of the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency, the Aged Care Complaints Commissioner and the Health Department.

The independent review will examine and report by 31 August 2017 on the Federal Government’s aged-care accreditation, monitoring, review, investigation, complaints and compliance processes.

“I want to get to the bottom of any shortcomings in the national regulatory system that meant that the Commonwealth was not aware of the extent of the problems with the quality of care at this facility earlier,” Mr Wyatt said.

“The Federal Department of Health has received complaints and had ongoing contact with this facility in the past. This review will, therefore, consider how the extent of the issues had not become clearer to us.

“I want this independent investigation’s recommendations to assure me and the community that the regulatory system in residential aged care works effectively.

“I want this review to see if there are any short comings in the regulatory system that prevented the concerns at the Makk and McLeay wards being identified, as this regulatory system applies across the wider residential aged care system.”

Opinion: Cost-cutting Government at fault for oversights

I have written about the role that public service cuts have played on both the Government’s online Census debacle and Centrelink’s automated debt-recovery system before, but the recent Oakden issues show there are consequences even worse than that.

This is not an isolated case. The report in The Weekend Australian found at least 10 examples of aged-care homes that formally met all of the regulator’s 44 accreditation standards, yet it was later revealed that they failed to provide a reasonable standard of care. These included three cases where patients died due to receiving inadequate care.

The Government’s review into the oversight process is welcome, but it doesn’t take a genius to figure out that the constant cuts to the public service would have an effect on the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency’s ability to monitor the sector properly.

The Government’s policy of not replacing public service staff that leave has seen a wealth of knowledge leave all sectors, and few could prove as damaging as the experience lost around aged care.

More than 18,000 public service jobs have already been lost and if the hard-line stance continues in the Federal Budget handed down next week, yet more could be gutted from the system.

These short-sighted cuts, without any thought about their real world effect, will only lead to more problems from the service delivery sector.

If the Australian Aged Care Quality Agency is going to be asked to do more than just tick boxes and actually monitor the sector properly, it is going to need a proper injection of resources. Hopefully this review makes those suggestions and the Government follows through so we can see a better quality of care across the sector.

Are you happy with the way aged care facilities are currently monitored? Have you had complaints about the treatment of a loved one ignored? Share your experiences in the comments section below.

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    COMMENTS

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    Old Geezer
    4th May 2017
    9:39am
    Time to legalise euthanasia and not have to worry about nursing homes. I certainly don't want to play bingo in God's waiting room waiting for my number to be called.
    grounded
    4th May 2017
    10:02am
    I'll endorse that OG. Had two relatives in the past few years who died the most drawn out, horrific & painful deaths...yet not allowed to cap themselves...as they wished they could have.

    As for the very old & old, who just sit all day dribbling from the mouth - (which there are 000's, of), it may be a little more complicated. Provided the are fully lucid and compass...with the mind capacity to know and request same...then yes. Dignity is a wonderful state of being.
    Slimmer Cat
    4th May 2017
    10:41am
    If you're in favor of euthanasia then join one of many groups around Australia who are pushing to have the law changed. "Exit International", Andrew Denton's "Go Gently Australia", or "Dying With Dignity".
    Legislation will never get through without support from the general population even though 75% of the population is in favor of euthanasia.
    Ourselves, whilst supporting the above organizations have gone one step further and joined "DIgnitas" in Switzerland which is the only overseas organization who will take people from other countries. It is not euthanasia but assisted suicide (you do lit yourself).
    Sen.Cit.90
    4th May 2017
    10:45am
    I agree OG. I would like the option, particularly when/if I become a nuisance unable to care for myself.
    Old Geezer
    4th May 2017
    10:48am
    I joined Dying with Dignity when it first stated.

    I have seen enough of what goes on in nursing homes to know that there is a better alternative available. Nothing worse than waiting to die.
    Placido
    4th May 2017
    11:09am
    Off you go then OG, there are some who would not choose the euthanasia path and others who would, choice is the operative word or are you suggesting it be compulsory to reduce the cost for the "taxpayer"

    I personally think that euthanasia should be legal but with good safeguards.
    Teddy
    4th May 2017
    11:13am
    Thoroughly agree with all the comments. Like Slimmer Cat I have joined these organisations and Christians for Euthanasia. I favour assisted suicide and the Dignitas model (the decision and the actions are entirely your own). The approval process for using the program is rigorous. The arguments against assisted suicide remind me vividly of the arguments raised against contraception in the 60's. We will look back and be astonished that it was ever considered reasonable for one group's values and preferences for end of life should so totally overwhelm those of the majority for so many years. If we aren't having a plebiscite on 'same sex marriage' we should use the money on assisted suicide where we know the majority of the population are gasping for a change.
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    11:25am
    Exactly a case in point to my post below - Obersturmbahnfuhrer Geezer has decided the gas chamber is the best and final solution.

    As to the rest of the comments here - he didn't mention voluntary euthenasia.... he said euthenasia, so start discussing the terms used first - then we'll split hairs.
    MICK
    4th May 2017
    3:44pm
    I'll ring Kevin Rudd for you Geezer. He'll be likely happy to assist you in getting off the LNP payroll.
    Triss
    4th May 2017
    9:26pm
    I agree with you, Placido, unfortunately I don't set much store by rules and laws made by governments. Once euthanasia is in place the rules surrounding it can be picked and changed and, by some officials, ignored. Look at the horrendous treatment in care homes yet there are laws and regulations in place to stop abuse.
    Hobbit
    4th May 2017
    11:00am
    More paperwork is just going to increase the cost of aged-care. Acting promptly on reported cases and secret shopper style inspections would be more effective
    GeorgeM
    4th May 2017
    11:35am
    Agree, Hobbitt, that action must be immediate on reported cases. However, I also can't understand why Govt agencies such as the so-called "... Quality Agency" mentioned above or Centrelink, etc, do not have regular Quality of Service surveys - as most private service providers do, as a means of identifying suspect services.
    Rae
    5th May 2017
    9:45am
    Enormous payouts to the families of those abused and huge fines will be the only deterrent. Now we have a money at all costs society it's the only thing they'll respond to.
    mareela
    4th May 2017
    11:08am
    Grounded, having been an RN for 45 years and just retired I have never seen a patient die "a drawn out, horrific and painful death". Palliative care services in Australia are second to none. You have the right to believe in euthanasia but that belief should not be related to a lack of adequate palliative care in Australia. Euthanasia is a massive ethical dilemma that I think will never be resolved, at least in Australia in the near future. There is a big difference between a patient who is terminally ill and someone who is not, but wishes to die because they feel they have a restricted lifestyle. Doctors take an oath to uphold life and many, if not the majority, would have a problem euthanising someone who is not terminally I'll. My father was terminally ill and I was with him constantly until he died and he was very well palliated. This subject will always be debated but I believe you will find as many people oppose euthanasia as will promote it.
    Placido
    4th May 2017
    11:10am
    Well said.
    Slimmer Cat
    4th May 2017
    11:15am
    I have seen several family members die in a manner that they found not acceptable to themselves and in pain and the thought of going into palliative care and receiving that kind of care is not for us. Assisted suicide is NOT euthanasia as you are provided with the means and do it yourself under care if you decide now is no the time well and good.
    Teddy
    4th May 2017
    11:20am
    Actually you are not correct. The majority of doctors as opposed to the more limited membership of the AMA support euthanasia and a large number of well organized and conducted opinion polls put community support consistently higher than 75%. You and other people, including some doctors, are at liberty to 'wait for nature to take its course' but the rest of us should not have to join you. If you have never seen anyone die in agony then you obviously didn't spend many of your 45 years in a terminally ill ward. We should also remember the large number of people ' predominantly elderly men, who commit suicide by firearms and hanging every year.
    Old Geezer
    4th May 2017
    11:29am
    Palliative care is nothing more than euthanasia done with very slow acting drugs. It's a lottery with organ fails first and kills you with the toxicity. I certainly don't fancy being drug to the eye balls in no man's land hovering between life and death. We are so cruel to our own kind.
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    11:31am
    Nobody is forcing you, Teddy - precisely the point in question as regards the opposite direction in this discussion - I'm sure you could choose for yourself... and frankly, anyone who imagines that massive doses of pain killing drugs will not 'speed things up' is dreaming.

    Happened to a friend recently with cancer - late diagnosis and she wanted out and was in such pain that the docs just loaded her up until she quietly passed away.

    Her husband is coming up to visit some time - not sure when - he's taking it well all considered.

    The point being made here is that - well - it sounds as if nobody is opposed to assisted death - but with safeguards lest it become mandatory that everyone do a Logan's Run or a Soylent Green at a specified age.
    OlderandWiser
    4th May 2017
    11:47am
    I do not believe that anyone could be an RN for over 40 years and not witness a slow and agonizing death, sorry! Clearly, you didn't do much work with terminal patients, Mareela.

    I am well aware of the risks attached to legalizing euthanasia, as a loved one was robbed and defrauded and would have been killed for her money by her own daughter if the daughter had thought she could get away with it. (She did get away with robbery and fraud, thanks to flawed banking privacy laws!)

    On the other hand, I watched two loved ones die very slowly and painfully. Yes, palliative care eases the physical pain. It doesn't eliminate it. Nor does it do anything to ease the emotional pain that both the dying and their loved ones suffer.

    One of the loved ones I watched suffer was a strong advocate for euthanasia. She begged me to kill her. In the end, I prayed nightly for her to die. Years later, I am still plagued by feelings of guilt and inadequacy because I could not help her die the way she wanted to - quickly and with dignity, and holding the hand of a loved one. I should have beautiful memories of a beautiful person who loved me dearly and was very good to me. Instead, I have painful memories of seeing her suffer for months, begging doctors for help to end it, and suffering a feeling that I had failed her by letting her suffer so.

    Not allowing voluntary assisted suicide is cruel. It beggars belief that despite repeated surveys showing that most people favour it, politicians are so arrogant as to ignore the majority and force their flawed moralistic opinions on us. They have no right. And those who loudly proclaim the sanctity of life should learn respect for the rights of those who want the freedom to make their own choices. Nobody has the right to demand that another person should have to continue to live when all quality and purpose of life is ended and all that can result from extending life is hurt and suffering.
    Slimmer Cat
    4th May 2017
    12:02pm
    OLD GEEZER is right, Palliative Care is a means of slow euthanasia as the patient is kept drugged up but still alive until finally it is decided that time to let you die and massive doses of drugs are introduced and you go into a coma and die in three days. In most cases the relatives have not had a chance to tell the loved one good bye.
    Yes RAINEY, having watched over a family member for weeks on end for it to end this way is a memory that will never leave you and it was this experience that sent us in the direction of Dignitas.
    If you treated the family dog or cat in the manner we have seen family members treated the RSPCA would have you charged with cruelty.
    grounded
    4th May 2017
    1:53pm
    @ Mareela.....I don't have 40 odd years Nursing experience. What I did have is a brain cancered brother, in 2004, in St Vincent's Palliative Care Unit, Sydney, with half his head burnt off...from Oncology...together with both good eyes burnt out, so confounding the Medical and Nursing staff as to what to do next to assist in placating the extreme agony he was in. The triple, automated method of morphine intake, and other associated like drugs TOTALLY in effective...against the constant level of agony that over rode these intakes.....(Considered more of a curiosity to the endless number of medico's who visited to witness such an event of overcoming the benefits of morphine and associated drugs)

    Even when finally sedated by then experimental means - which for still remaining legal reasons I won't go into - agony bouts still intermittently over rode experimental drug, and surfaced with regularity. This drug done what it was intended to do.....as discussed and agreed with family and Doctors prior....it killed him....stone dead within two days. Release and relief came to everyone...not least the terminal patient.

    No Mareela...I don't have 40 years RN experience...just four months at St. Vincent's Palliative Care Unit....watching wide spread UNTOLD suffering.....that was wholly untreatable.....as agreed by both Nursing and Medical staff.

    I don't recall saying the Palliative Care Units weren't second to none...though the last one; a Queensland Unit, lacked the hands on experience to deal with an MND patient, and was run more as a text book example...devoid of ANY empathy for a patient who could not communicate. Marvellous in dealing with patients who could communicate.

    Disgusted with your cheap assertion when entering this discussion mareela....as to what you have seen in 40 years. Some people live a life time, and can't see their nose in front of them.
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    11:22am
    Without assuming this happens everywhere - it is a terrible thing that it happens anywhere. Part of human nature - one of those parts we need to work very hard to get out of ourselves, is the urge to dominate anyone who is in a lesser position of power. Experiments have shown that people given absolute control over others will always revert to type -concentration camp guard. Way back in the 1970's an experiment at Sydney University was called off when the 'guards' became t realistic in their control > abuse of the 'inmates' in the experiment - after two days.

    As I said - it's a part of human nature that we need to work very hard to keep out of ourselves - lest we descend to the jungle discussed yesterday on another issue on this forum. Someone mentioned 'law of the jungle' and 'survival of the fittest' re' unemployed etc - and I had to take exception on the basis that we, as civilised and intelligent beings, should long ago have shed such nonsense.
    Jennie
    4th May 2017
    11:23am
    It's "likely to happen" because there is no mandatory reporting required for elder abuse. As a teacher, if I didn't report abuse I could be seriously fined. Reporting abuse of children is mandatory - the law. No law for the aged! However if the report is not followed up on, which I also experienced then what next!
    PS, by the way, learning how to "do it yourself" (die with dignity) is one hellava lot cheaper than Dignitas when you join Exit International. And you don't have the cost of traveling to Switzerland (or anywhere) plus all the extensive paperwork Dignitas require.
    Slimmer Cat
    4th May 2017
    11:33am
    However at Dignitas you can enjoy having all your family with you and not doing the job on your own alone when nobody is home and they don't come home to find you in bed with a plastic bag over your head.
    Jennie
    4th May 2017
    12:37pm
    I totally respect your choice as this is what dying with dignity is all about.

    However there are many people who can't afford the cost: $12,000 - $17,000 - could be more. Dignitas will make some concession for hardship, but then there is the cost of travel for you and your family.
    Will you feel well enough to travel? Australian Airlines have been known not to allow really ill people to fly.

    If you are daft enough to say you are depressed, then Dignitas will not give you the medication and you have wasted your money. Who wouldn't be depressed with a terminal and/or neurological illness?
    And if you are not of sound mind, then no go.

    If you intend to die at home here in the manner you describe, then you should discuss with your family in advance exactly what you intend to do so they are not surprised or shocked.
    Slimmer Cat
    4th May 2017
    1:02pm
    You are correct JENNIE, Dignitas is not for anybody who is on a low income as not many have the $US20,000 to get to Switzerland and pay for the service. Once you have joined and filled out all the forms and paid your money then, YES, they will accept you if you become dotty as that is what you have signed up for.
    Following on from the above in Australia, euthanasia, or assuring you have a dignified death is covered by how much money you have to be able to go overseas and the government not agreeing to even have a discussion on the subject is discrimination against lower incomes whereas it should be a discussion for all.
    Every politician, before they are allowed to vote on euthanasia, should have to spend time, a day at least, in a palliative care ward for the dying and talk to relatives and the patient before they vote.
    Jennie
    4th May 2017
    1:19pm
    Thanks Slimmer Cat. I don't think the issue of Dignitas giving the medication to those with dementia is quite clear. I suspect it depends on how severe the dementia is and what is causing it. I would be interested to discover more information on this. I have researched same but have not yet found clarification. (I don't give any credence to newspaper reports!)

    And yes, politicians support legalising euthanasia (which should be renamed "dying with dignity") when they have witnessed the suffering of a loved one.
    Slimmer Cat
    4th May 2017
    2:06pm
    Jennie, I don't go by newspaper reports either I go by what I have signed up for. It is in our contracts with Dignitas.
    Jennie
    4th May 2017
    5:02pm
    Dear Slimmer Cat, would be be comfortable in sharing the Dignitas policy on dementia in this forum? I would be most grateful for any information you could give.
    Thanks in anticipation.
    Ted Wards
    4th May 2017
    11:45am
    Its quite simple. When the accreditation happens, all facilities are given up to three months to prepare and are notified of the dates of the visits. Three months is a long time to coach people into showing how wonderful the facility is, and conversely, to hide what they don't want the auditors to see. Clients are selected for the auditors to visit, so naturally you will chose the clients that fits the picture you want to present. What the audiors see is a very constructed view, not the real picture. That is at the heart of this issue. Auditors only see what we want them to see.
    KSS
    4th May 2017
    12:15pm
    I agree Ted Wards. It may well not be the actual accreditation/review process per se that is at fault but the fact that so much advance warning of visits is given. Exactly the same issue was part of the private education system where training organisations were always warned of inspection audit visits. Shonky RTOs got away with all sorts for years. Stop the advance warning of audit visits. After all if you are doing the right thing it shouldn't matter whether you have warning or not, should it?
    Jennie
    4th May 2017
    12:40pm
    The nursing home where the daughter videoed her father being force fed was given its accreditation again in spite of the abuse!
    Accreditation is a sham and a scam.
    Jennie
    4th May 2017
    12:41pm
    As I said above, there is no mandatory reporting for abuse in aged care as there is for school children by teachers.
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    12:47pm
    Ah yes - the old Potemkin village principle in action, eh?
    Old Man
    4th May 2017
    1:11pm
    Would be nice if the whole story on Oakden was given. In 2008, the SA government commissioned an inquiry on Oakden which was scathing in its report. The report has only been released in February this year after a lot of pressure by the opposition and the media. Since 2008 there have been at least 4 ministers responsible and they have all denied any knowledge of any problems. The current minister has been caught out lying as she replied to a letter from a federal MP. In her response she claimed that Oakden had not had a shortage of staff but was above the required staffing level.

    Makk and McLeay wards form a small part of the facility which is mainly under the control of the SA government. The federal government had an inquiry some time back and were assured by SA health that all was well. The current federal inquiry is in response to suspicious deaths and ill treatment of patients in the part of the facility under the control of SA.
    Old Man
    4th May 2017
    3:18pm
    I might add that the "surprise" audits by the SA government into Oakden were made after giving the facility 4 weeks notice.
    Ted Wards
    5th May 2017
    8:58am
    Have we forgotten the one in Unley that was also closed down by the Council in 2000?
    John
    4th May 2017
    1:29pm
    Old Geezer,
    Legalising euthanasia is a nonsense, You don't need it. If you want to kill yourself go ahead.
    Plenty of ways to do it from an overdose of pills to jumping out into the traffic. Who cares it its legal or not. Just do it while you are still mobile. Legalising euthanasia just encourages your nearest and dearest to legally murder you for the inheritance.
    Jennie
    4th May 2017
    1:40pm
    I agree with "do it yourself." But tricky if you physically can't do it or have dementia.
    Jumping out into traffic or in front of trains is selfish as it traumatises the drivers and the witnesses. And who is happy to clear up the mess? Overdosing on any medication other than the type used by Dignitas can cause you to vomit it up and/or leave you with brain damage. It's like playing Russian Roulette. If you want to overdose on insulin and/or Potassium Chloride then you have to set yourself up on an intravenous drip...
    Suicide is of course legal. Murder is not. Relatives have murdered their aged relatives for centuries for their money...
    Old Geezer
    5th May 2017
    3:09pm
    Wouldn't it be so much nicer to say good bye to everyone and then just drink something to put you asleep never to wake up? So much nicer then finding you dead from an over dose or hung from the rafters by a rope. Jumping in front of cars or trains is traumatic for those involved not something I'd want to be part of.

    Yes I do have the knowledge on how to provide my own euthanasia but it is against the law for me to tell anyone. Why can't this knowledge be embraced instead?
    MICK
    4th May 2017
    3:42pm
    Are we kidding? Abuse in the aged care sector is well understood but nothing has been done about it despite the media routinely running such stories. And now apparently this has come to light?
    Quite frankly this is the way our country runs: politicians and their bureaucrats know about problems but do not act until they have no choice. Welcome to a country which is mismanaged.
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    5:14pm
    Not mismanaged, Mick - managed for reasons and purposes other than the best interests of those who live there. It's not a simple matter of poor management - it is deliberate policy.
    MICK
    4th May 2017
    5:59pm
    I understand this Trebor and normally refer to this behaviour by its correct title: CLASS WARFARE. Quite deliberate and targeted.
    If the well off had the same treatment then the problem would be fixed immediately. Quite clear.
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    6:51pm
    I know you know - just saying so all are on the same page.
    Jtee
    4th May 2017
    5:02pm
    Those who are against voluntary euthanasia haven't been involved in a loved one's suffering, in and out of consciousness, waiting for the inevitable end. Hard and traumatic for all involved. Cruel on everyone involved. If we treated our animals this way we would be charged with cruelty.

    Much "nicer" to be "put to sleep" like the animals. Cat purring, dog getting a hug, horse eating a snack .....
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    6:03pm
    As far as I can see - nobody is against voluntary euthanasia - but they are wary of euthanasia - get the difference?
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    5:11pm
    When they came for those with dementia,
    I did not speak out.

    When they came for the old and frail in their beds,
    I did not speak out.

    When they came for the mentally handicapped,
    I did not speak out.

    When they came for the chronically ill,
    I did not speak out.

    When they came for the unemployed,
    I did not speak out.

    When they came for the trade unionists,
    I did not speak out.

    When they came for the socially undesirable,
    I did not speak out.

    When they came for the enemies of the State,
    I did not speak out.

    When finally they came for me,
    There was nobody left to speak out.
    Triss
    4th May 2017
    9:51pm
    That is so right, Trebor.
    TREBOR
    5th May 2017
    7:19pm
    Those without a knowledge of history are doomed to repeat it. We're already discussing 'economic triage' for those who are too bone lazy to get off their butts and get one of those millions of jobs waiting out there. We're already talking about hounding pensioners into and after the grave. We're already talking about economically and health wise triaging 'drug addicts', smokers, alcoholics, and any others deemed to be guilty of causing their own situation.

    What's next? Economic triage for criminals, and we already know about the jobs gulag being offered trade unionists.

    Noam Chomsky has it pretty right in "Requiem For the American Dream".
    Gardengirl
    4th May 2017
    5:15pm
    The bigger question is - what is happening to our humanity? Are we so devoid of mercy/brotherly love that the sight of someone incapacitated makes us want to mistreat or even exterminate that human. After we're dealt with the oldies will we start on the infirm and the babies. How many times has it been proven that a person who can not give out may very well be taking a situation in. The slippery slope!
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    9:15pm
    This may help:-

    https://moviesub.is/movies-requiem-for-the-american-dream-2015-moviesub.html

    4th May 2017
    5:32pm
    this is another example of how dumb, uneducated and stupid most of these who give their views on the issues in these columns are, the subject was about the care and services our Elderly are receiving yet 95% of those who contributed? comments suggested it was better to exterminate the victims, the Elderly, either by their own hand or by assisted suicide, very few if any suggested that more supervision and rules in the nursing homes be followed as it might assure our Elderly be looked after the way they deserve and yes their offspring might have to wait a bit longer to collect the bounty, but so be it.
    Jennie
    4th May 2017
    6:26pm
    I certainly do not advocate involuntary euthanasia.
    I already have said twice in this forum that there is no mandatory reporting for elder abuse. This is WRONG!

    There was no need for you to be rude about individual opinions.

    If is your choice to go into a nursing home, I totally support that.
    TREBOR
    4th May 2017
    6:47pm
    Would ye be needing assistance to get to yer nursing home, heemie? We'll pass the hat around.
    MICK
    4th May 2017
    7:28pm
    Already there methinks. I can hear the dementia.
    Triss
    4th May 2017
    9:54pm
    Has being offensive to everyone made you feel better about yourself, Heemskerk99?
    Anonymous
    5th May 2017
    5:22pm
    I was not offensive just noted that the majority of comments on this site got nothing to do with the question asked, as for trebor's comment, it be the day I would take money of a poor old pensioner sob, sob like you, however I loved the comment of our labor great micky, he can hear the dementia, any wonder, he still thinks he is zorro, still got his mask on, the only thing missing is a horse, then again he obliviously keeps looking into the mirror, have a good day,
    TREBOR
    5th May 2017
    11:36pm
    "I'm not really offensive, I was just drawn that way... just because it sounded nasty, doesn't mean it is..."
    GrayComputing
    5th May 2017
    8:02am
    IT IS ALL ABOUT MONEY AND GREED
    Sadly even some of the charitable or religious groups run them like a business.
    It must make a big profit at all costs. The state of the people in their care do not count.
    Old Geezer
    5th May 2017
    3:10pm
    Yes aged care is all about profit. If they look after their in mates well then that's a bonus.
    Evie
    5th May 2017
    6:39pm
    I worked in aged care for many years I saw a lot of abuse .When I left the job I wrote a letter to the owner about the night nurses abusing the patient s. The Nursing Home did nothing about the abuse.Seven years later the same nurses work there nothing has changed.
    Anonymous
    5th May 2017
    8:51pm
    evie why did you not put in a complaint to the proper authotity in regard to the abuse, no good complaining to those who run these establishments, they are only after their own pockets and as for the people working in these places, most need the income and if they complain they are out of a job and unless people the likes of you or those who still work in the industry, give evidence and stand up for their believes nothing will change, no good complaining in these columns as most contributors, ? would not know if the sun was up or down or was shining out of their a..holes
    Jennie
    5th May 2017
    11:24pm
    As I have already said there is no mandatory reporting required by law for elder abuse. Currently is is possible that the Aged Rights Advocacy Service
    www.sa.agedrights.asn.au/
    funded by the Office for the Aging (OFTA) would advise. This is in SA, and I don't know about other States. However there is a brand new campaign here to "Stop Elder Abuse." No doubt when Evie was working, she could find no support or wasn't told what agency might be useful. Actually stopping elder abuse is impossible, as in spite of mandatory reporting for child abuse, child abuse still continues. Both situations are a disgrace in our society.
    Also see:
    https://www.sahealth.sa.gov.au/wps/wcm/connect/37f6ac004c77e8e48247cbdbb1e972ca/Workers+-+Where+can+you+report+elder+abuse.pdf?MOD=AJPERES&CACHEID=37f6ac004c77e8e48247cbdbb1e972ca

    The information here is not entirely encouraging, but it's the "best" you can do.
    Hemmskerk, I wonder why you are so rude and angry. Have you been abused in some way yourself? If so I can understand where you are coming from.
    Anonymous
    6th May 2017
    5:52pm
    jennie quoting your own words you state, mandatory reporting is not required by law for elder abuse, however where does it state the mistreatment of anybody is the norm, what is stopping you of using your own initiative to lay a complaint by notifying the proper authorities, your local member of federal government, your local member of state government, the opposition, both state and federal, use the newspapers, use your local paper, if an ex-service person is a victim see the R.S.L., the police, write to the minister in charge, state and federal, do I have to go on, I can guarantee you it will get results and as for you stating it is impossible stopping elder abuse and for that matter child abuse the real guilty ones are those of us who play the game of the three wise monkeys, they don't see, they don't hear, they don't speak up!
    as for your comment of me being abused, I was brought up in a family where we were taught right of wrong, to look after every person may he or she be old or young and to follow the only way of life, treat any person the way you would like to be treated.
    As for being rude or angry, maybe an better term would be frustrated of seeing these articles being hyacked for political reasons.
    Jennie
    6th May 2017
    11:29pm
    The link to information I supplied did say that one should inform the police about elder abuse. I do not work in aged care, but as a teacher reported child abuse, so I don't ignore abuse. Please don't make assumptions. I have been working hard to deal with the emotional and psychological abuse in the retirement village where I live. And I have had results. Our abusive village manager has left due to complaints being made to her boss. Doing this did take an emotional toll on me, but I continued to fight to stop the abuse. Abuse of any kind is a disgrace as I said above. It is not to be accepted as the norm because it isn't the norm. No-one should ignore abuse, I agree with you on that. But abuse happens because some people have no compassion or conscience.
    What have you done about abuse? You have much to tell others what to do. I don't understand what you mean by "political reasons." I have none.
    crypticpat
    9th May 2017
    2:04pm
    Accreditation is all about having the paperwork complete when the inspectors arrive, and there is plenty of warning. Often the paperwork has little connection to the realities of life in care. Another problem is caused by going to tech for a Certificate in Aged Care as one of the requisites to keep the dole. This means that people who haven't the slightest interest in the Aged are getting jobs in the field with a subsequent drop in standards.


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