Franking Credits: how good is free money?

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The cat is out of the bag. Bank shares have shot up since the surprise election result as new investors pile onto the great franking credits bandwagon, Sandi Keane reports.

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“Hey, you got any of these franking credits,” older bloke asks mate. It’s two days post-election. I’m on my regular break from my home desk with my dog, Mackie, in Kew’s affogato central. Leafy Kew was at the heart of Kooyong’s electoral battleground. The two men are at an adjoining table at the cafe. They’re talking about the “franking credits” campaign – the pitched battle to win the retiree vote. “No,” is the reply, “but I’m gonna look into them.”

That night, I’m on my way to Hamer Hall to an ACO concert with old pal, Rex. “I’ve transferred all my money into bank shares,” he announces, awaiting my reaction. Then to press home the point, he jabs me in the ribs “I not only get all that free money, but the share price has gone up!” He laughs. And he voted Greens!

Fast forward to the end of the week and I’m back in Kew cafe-land with the four-legged one, getting my coffee fix again. It’s a different cafe. We’re seated outside. A couple of elders go past. My ears prick up….they’re talking about “franking credits”. But they’re not congratulating themselves for keeping Bill Shorten’s hands off their “free money”. No, they’re wondering how they can get their hands on some! Jeez…

Seriously, how good is Tim Wilson and cousin Kevin, or is it Geoff?

Few of us silly old duffers had a bloody clue about “franking credits” until Tim and cousin Geoff started jumping up and down championing the unique advantage of owning shares with “franking credits”. And how good is Australia … the only country in the world to offer a cash reward!

Tim took care of the Parliamentary Inquiry and the town hall meetings focussing on the high retiree states of Tassie and Queensland. Geoff harnessed his travelling roadshow, Wilson Asset Management, and headed up north to spread the word. Between them, they sparked ire in the hearts of Queenslanders and Tasmanians. Not only would they lose all that free money, but the world as they knew it would end. Worked a charm.

Post-election, Geoff was itching to congratulate himself for alerting the voters about franking credits. And avoiding Armageddon. Claimed his campaign helped deliver a fatal blow to Labor’s hopes of election. But he’s too modest by half. Thanks to the Wilson boys, not one of the nearly four million over 65s would now be unaware of the “free money” gig when they retire. What a legacy, boys!

So, now we oldies have been enlightened, have we shown our gratitude, especially to Tim?  Such a formidable force for good should surely have been promoted to cabinet!  What’s wrong with ScoMo? This reporter still remembers saluting Tim for duking it out (single-handedly, mind) against the Labor Government’s “plain packaging” proposals for ciggie packets.

Wilson the Younger stormed the airwaves on behalf of Big Tobacco, clocking up 13 radio interviews in one day, a robust opinion piece in The Australian, and managed to pop up, fresh as a daisy, on prime time 7.30 Report that night. Be afraid, he warned. Be very afraid. This outrageous plan would cost the public $3 billion in compensation!

If our government took away a company’s logo, it could be seen as stealing! Good to see Tim working with the government and on our side now!

So, on 22 May, I put out a Tweet to gauge the level of gratitude to Tim. It’s had over 10,000 impressions as of 28 May:

and again the next day, over 10,000 for the first Tweet then jumping to over 20,000 for the second:

I was inundated with responses. Was a spot worried I’d be seen as a self-serving, greedy oldie, you know, one of those “solipsistic slackers” that journos like Bernard Keane like to target. There was the expected bit of unfriendly fire – but, by and large, I could tell the Tweeps were genuinely grateful to Tim.

Does anyone in Australia now NOT KNOW they can get #FreeMoney for investing in things like banks if they’ve retired and want to set up their own fund? And the more of you who buy shares, the more the shares will go up! Double whammy! Win, Win! Whoohoo! As I said, “how good is Tim Wilson?” Get into it, guys. Follow me!

If you still want the nitty gritty on those franking credits, check out our Kitchen Table series by the redoubtable Westy who has translated complicated financial bafflegab into simple words that even I can understand (I call it “Franking Credits for Dummies”). Start with the one below:

The Kitchen Table: a Franking Credits Revelation


Editor’s Note: Treasury found up to 230,000 pensioners would have been affected by Labor’s original policy. “The value of franking credits refunded has increased from $1.9 billion in 2005-06 to $5.9 billion in 2014-15,” Treasury found.

This article originally appeared on www.michaelwest.com.au and has been republished with permission from the author.

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Sandi Keane is MW editor-in-chief and was formerly editor and environment editor at Independent Australia. She has $15,000 worth of franking credits in her SMSF and, until recently, never knew how they got there.

Still don’t think franking credits policy will be reviewed? Are you one of the many retirees now taking advantage of Franking credit refunds? Do you think it’s possible that this ‘windfall’ for the banks post-royal commission was somehow planned?

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Written by Sandi Keane

165 Comments

Total Comments: 165
  1. 0
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    Free money….what a load of BS. It’s basically a tax offset for Tax that YOU as a company owner (shareholder) have already paid.
    Mmmm…I wonder what would happen if the FULL dividend before tax was paid out. Gee, there’d be a few worried people on both sides of the fence then.

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      Not so – it is tax paid on behalf of the shareholder, and must be included in the shareholder’s gross income for calculation.

      You show clearly the deliberate confusion created around this very simple issue, and the clear reason for one simple change – abolish dividend franking.

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      The next step is to ensure that the tax matters of all are being handled correctly according to the rules – and some of those rules clearly need to be changed.

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      I agree, Bob, either let it be or abolish it. Labor took a half-arsed approach by allowing some to have it and others to be denied it. Australians are very proud of the fact that Jack is as good as his master and won’t cop a class war.

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      Keith, if it’s not FREE money then why are taxpayers footing the bill?

      Why are more Australians getting Franking Credits?

      Why are Franking Credits unique to Australia and not the rest of the globe?

      Welfare for the rich was created by the LNP whereas welfare for the poor was created by the ALP.

      Australia has the highest deficit in history thanks to welfare for the well off and tax evasion loopholes which this Government does not want to close.

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      TREBOR, this Government supports Centrelink Robo Debt and harasses innocent Australians that owe nothing from years ago to fix up the debt instead of stopping tax evasion loopholes and Franking Credits.

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      Jackie, get over it, YOU LOST, and now with nothing left but numb nuts in your preferred party, you may be in the wilderness for some time now.

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      It shows that Keith and others still have no idea about franking credits. Of course it’s free money. Corporate tax is returned to the share holder. So companies pay effectively no tax. If all bank shares were owned by retirees, that bank would return all their company tax to shareholders and the government would receive zero. That’s how it works. And any retiree who does not get onto the gravy train is not doing him or herself a favour. Just wait for the Libs to close it down though. Their scare campaign has done it’s job and they will now adopt Labor policy.

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      +1 Tropic. I just hope more pensioners and SFRs pile into banks etc chasing credits (i.e. free money) and enjoy them while they can. Please old people, do not whinge when you lose the equivalent amount or more on falling share price. Choices have consequences.

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      arbee, I will not get over an unjust that robs the poor to give to the rich.

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      The taxpayers are not footing the bill for franking credits.Only a refund of overpaid tax,If you cannot see this Jackie perhaps a brain transplant might help.

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      The taxpayers are not footing the bill for franking credits.Only a refund of overpaid tax,If you cannot see this Jackie perhaps a brain transplant might help.

    • 0
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      jackie the poor are not being robbed. Around $120 billion in welfare is redistributed. Spending has consequences.

      The Government should concentrate on building jobs and public housing and stop picking winners and losers to attack.

  2. 0
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    As long as tax matters are handled correctly (not just legally – some of that needs to change), there never was any argument about franked credits, for the simple reason that the percentage paid in advance by the company is part of the shareholder’s gross income. Plainly that has not happened, and the easiest way is to revert to ‘company pays its company taxes’, ‘shareholder pays personal income taxes’ as required.

    There remains confusion about company taxes – they are, however, separate from personal income taxes levied on shareholders, and this must be absolutely clarified once and for all – shareholders have NOT paid tax via the company meeting its tax obligations, and thus are not exempt from personal income tax.

    All that needs to be made totally clear is whether or not a company may take shareholder dividend payout as a tax deduction – once and for all.

    The current confused mess seems to me to have been quite deliberate and calculated for benefit of a few.

    • 0
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      The article is about idiots talking to other idiots. The notion that banking shares are the best thing since sliced cheese will be shown for the BS it is. Like Telstra pays good fully franked dividends, but the prices of the shares keep going down. Its the behaviour of idiots to get a good return whilst the capital keeps going down.

      The whole argument about franking credits is flawed. We were prepared to cop a hit to our modest income but other greedy Australians were not. The rest is history and after a right wing media promotion of their man. Labor shot itself in both feet and has itself to blame for losing an unlosable election.

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      If these people talking about now knowing about franking credits and “how to get free money” then I believe that most of them will do their dough.

      If you did’nt know before then you knew little about finance and that is a sure way to lose your money. I suppose these folk never heard of Poseiden in the 70’s or tulips in Holland several hundred years ago.

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      Lions and lambs people. If these “investors” do their dough chasing credits then so be it. Choices have consequences.

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      MICK, the Royal Commission into banks that the entire NLP voted against several times each exposed banks.

      So many NLP family members work for those banks.

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      You are correct, Mick – franking credits are still a proportion of a dividend on share, and if the share goes down, so does the franked component.

      I’ve posted the ATO and ASIC links before, and clearly the percentage of franking is determined by the company’s operations and must be passed through ASIC. If the company is suffering and haemmorhaging money, the franking component of a share will drop.

      Apart from that – the actual reality is that franking credits have become totally confused with company tax(es) and shareholder personal income tax… and that can only have been a deliberate ploy. Company and shareholders are NOT one and the same, and each has a burden of tax to pay on profit income, same as anyone who works for a living.

      Obviously Labor and LNP are so deep in this they will never sort it out.

  3. 0
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    Welfare for the wealthy.

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      yea I get some money from franking credits. Ahhh it going to cost the government money, but wait a minute I don’t cost the government pension money I don’t get a seniors health card. Oh got my own house so no rent rebate. Why do I not feel the love for looking after myself, instead I feel hatred coming my way.

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      yea I get some money from franking credits. Ahhh it going to cost the government money, but wait a minute I don’t cost the government pension money I don’t get a seniors health card. Oh got my own house so no rent rebate. Why do I not feel the love for looking after myself, instead I feel hatred coming my way.

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      Thats correct 4b2….This issue gets a completely different twist to it compared to the change in the pension assets test in the 2015 budget by Morrison and Abbott, when about a million part-age pensioners either lost their pension altogether or it was drastically reduced, thereby stuffing up their legitimately planned retirements for the duration.
      Not a squeal out of the the very same high earners about this broken promise, but who are now squealing about losing their free taxpayer funded franking credits largesse..What a bunch of hypocrites..
      But it will all soon come to an end, because the budget “bottom line” dictates that it cannot be sustained and must be reigned in and halted.

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      Discontented, your Franking Credits pay more than the pension that is why you have them.

      This means Franking Credits cost taxpayers more than pensions.

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      Discontented, if you are not in receipt of the Senior Health Card then you are very well off. It is a very generous cut off at $54,000 for singles and $86,000 for couples.
      It is not hatred, it is about fairness. Maybe now you will be eligible for a Seniors Health Card assuming your income will be reduced below the stated amounts.
      There is no shame in a part pension either.
      If you were to lose your franking credits that money would hopefully go to schools and hospitals or something to benefit everyone.
      People are not stating the amount of the franking credits or how it will affect their income.
      People know what pensioners get but others don’t state their incomes on here or how much the franking credits are.
      Like many other people I did not even know of their existence until all this ruckus.

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      Paddington schools and hospitals are State responsibilities and won’t get extra funds at all.

      Tax just removes money from the economy to control inflation. We have no inflation problems which is why tax cuts for workers and business owners is being planned.

      GST and Stamp Duty etc is used for schools and hospitals by the States. They had more money before privatising everything as well. That foolish action cost State revenue.

      Not everyone wants to jump through Centrelink hoops or depend on the welfare system.

      Encouraging decades of savers to delay gratification to fund themselves with existing rules and then changing those rules at the end is not cricket.

      And shame is in the belief, thoughts and feelings area. No more wrong than believing welfare when you could have supported yourself is right simply because you are eligible.

      My income is well below the $54 000 but I’m not receiving credits or welfare as I value freedom and independence far too highly to apply just yet.

      jackie what are you on about. Franking credits do not pay more than the pension.

      The average payout in franked shares is in the hundreds of dollars annually.

      You’d need to have around $600 000 to $800 000 in shares to get the $40 000 the aged pension pays to those unable or unwilling to save.

      Why bother saving at all to buy risky shares when the welfare industry will give you risk free return for spending all your money?

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      Rae, aged pensioners do not get $40,000. If you are getting less than $54,000 why would you not get the Senior Health Card? There is no shame in that.
      A couple can have up to $86,000 and get the Senior Health Card which I am sure would help save some money.
      I don’t think you are right about people only getting hundreds of dollars because most are saying $7,000 or more. This govt will also examine this in their review.
      There seems to be a slur in your last statement against pensioners, not at all nice to do that!

  4. 0
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    It is NOT free money.
    As a shareholder tax was paid and I get a credit for it.
    I knew about it when it was first introduced and bought shares to plan for my retirement.I am not a wealthy person and the $3000 I get each year was going to be taken away from me by the Labor Party who claim they are for the workers.

  5. 0
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    Well, this governments made their bed .,.

  6. 0
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    Australians voted on May 18th knowing that franking credits was a policy of Labor and rejected Labor. That wasn’t the only reason as the climate policy was a mystery and the best Shorten could do when asked about the cost was to give the non-answer that the cost of doing nothing would be worse. A cynic could suggest that if he knew the cost of doing nothing then he would know the cost of doing something as a comparison.

    A lot has been made of the “quiet” Australians who voted for anyone but Labor and this site is a perfect example of what makes the “quiet” voter. Anyone who chooses to post in this forum anything against Labor or in support of the Coalition is abused with personal attacks. There is no rebuttal of statements with counter arguments or facts, just vilification. It then becomes easier to say nothing and let the bullies have their way or if asked for an opinion by a pollster tell them what you think they want to hear.

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      Three trillion is the cost of doing nothing. You cannot possibly continue to deny climate change and if you do, then is it worth the risk you are wrong?
      More coal being dug and water used to support that is horrendous.
      Jobs for Aussies in doubt as India is reliant their workers at home now.
      Governments selling their souls for the almighty dollar but the cost is more than money.
      Abuse and personal attacks have been far worse from right wing and their supporters. Lies perpetrated by Palmer and LNP went beyond anything we have ever seen. My brother can attest to that on the ground in Qld.
      Greens are continually criticised and lied about and yet they are the only ones prepared to go the whole hog to protect the environment. Now the Qld premier has caved in to Adani because she is scared for her job.
      Low paid workers are not protected by the right side of politics. What does that say? Poorer people spend all their money so are vital to the economy. Every cent you give to them they spread around in their local communities. What percentage do you think they prop up the economy with that?
      Wealthy people save the money.
      I have no issue with people being wealthy so long as they help with charities and many do but not enough.

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      Correction: workers are being (trained) in India now

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      The issue on the cost of a climate change policy is that quite frankly a cost cannot be put on it. If Shorten had put a dollar figure on it he would have been lying. The question asked was on a par with asking if you’d stopped beating your wife.
      It is also the case that the cost of doing nothing about it will be horrendous. There is a lot of indications around the World that climate is changing and, by the Earths time scale, quickly.

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      The issue on the cost of a climate change policy is that quite frankly a cost cannot be put on it. If Shorten had put a dollar figure on it he would have been lying. The question asked was on a par with asking if you’d stopped beating your wife.
      It is also the case that the cost of doing nothing about it will be horrendous. There is a lot of indications around the World that climate is changing and, by the Earths time scale, quickly.

    • 0
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      Well said OM.

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      Paddington, I believe that there is climate change, what I have issue with is how much of it is man made. If Australia stops digging up coal and exporting it today, it will have no affect on pollution because China and India will source their coal from other countries. Australia will have higher unemployment, an increased deficit and a lowering of living standards.

      You have no proof that India is planning to bring workers for the Adani project, the CFMMEU would never allow that to happen. That’s the same CFMMEU which asked voters in Queensland to reject Labor as they wouldn’t support the Adani project. Yes, Palmer lied but I can’t agree that the LNP in Queensland also lied. The Greens are hypocrites, the fossil fuel guzzling convoy to save the planet backfired and increased the LNP vote in Queensland.

      Tom Tank, I don’t agree that a cost can’t be put on a climate change policy. All policies must have an objective, an outcome and a cost to the nation for them to be credible. Labor wanted to increase the number of businesses that would pay for their pollution and that has a cost which must be given. Any business that has a cost added must find the funds to pay for that cost. If it cannot be absorbed in general trading then either jobs are lost or the price of their product must rise.

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      when it came down to not having money to pay your utility bills or paying who knows what in taxes for climate change…people voted via the hip pocket…and they always will!

    • 0
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      Paddington I take it you no longer use a mobile phone, drive car or eat meat ? Maybe not fly in an airplane or ride on a bus ? If you still do then why ? You cannot argue for CC but take no effort to reduce your own carbon emission. Maybe your argument is that as one person you would not make any difference. Well check out what difference Australia can make on CC without the three biggest carbon emission countries, India, USA and China reducing their emissions. Zilch. Same argument. Maybe you could join Bob Brown on a caravan to Beijing.

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      Paddington I take it you no longer use a mobile phone, drive car or eat meat ? Maybe not fly in an airplane or ride on a bus ? If you still do then why ? You cannot argue for CC but take no effort to reduce your own carbon emission. Maybe your argument is that as one person you would not make any difference. Well check out what difference Australia can make on CC without the three biggest carbon emission countries, India, USA and China reducing their emissions. Zilch. Same argument. Maybe you could join Bob Brown on a caravan to Beijing.

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      Now i know you are a Liberal stooge

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      Paddington, climate change action could start with the type of shares to invest in.

      Stop investing in companies that are destroying the environment and banks that do the same.

      Environmentally, conscience decisions can make a huge difference.

    • 0
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      Yes, it is true people are being trained in India. At what capacity and how many there were no details on that however.
      About meat etc. yes that is possibly coming too, cutting down for a start.
      We don’t use the car much. Mobile is mainly for emergencies. They are good questions that we will have to address soon.
      I refuse paper and demand emails of documents etc.
      I can’t fly so that is a given. Never assume, just ask!
      Yes, agree, we need to be mindful each and every day and do all we personally can and learn what makes differences and help to educate others.
      We need to be an example on an individual level and globally.

    • 0
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      time to take a Valium Paddington,you are hallucinating

    • 0
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      time to take a Valium Paddington,you are hallucinating

    • 0
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      You are right pafddington. When I spent all my money I was always poor and struggled to even pay the bills.

      Once I cut down spending and saved a little bit I soon became “wealthy” in that I could pay my bills and not worry about emergencies.

      Definitely a correlation there.

      Pity attacking savers is a thing now.

      $3 billion dollars of a fuss but welfare is $120 billion annually and growing.

      Keeping those people off the aged pension could be as sensible as paying rebates for private education or private health fund membership.

      Besides until we have inflation we haven’t a need to raise taxes. In fact tax cuts are coming.

      Leaving savers alone for a year or two after the past few years of attacking them could be a good move.

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      Rae, social security and welfare budget for 2019/20 is forecast at $180.1 billion or roughly $7000 for every man, woman and child (and all other genders in between).

    • 0
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      Well said Paddington, agree with you entirely.

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      Wow Farside. That is an indication that something is very wrong. That’s an incredible amount of money to redistribute and still have those getting it wanting to take $3 billion from those who saved to buy shares for themselves under existing rulings.

  7. 0
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    Let’s have a guess as to how long it will be before the Libs decide that the deal is too good, and that retirees are a soft target, and remove the franking credits rort. Won’t be long, because it is too expensive for our weak economy to handle. A year? 18 months? or maybe some other way to rip the old folk off, so that we are all just where we started, or worse off.

    You might then think of the word “hypocracy” and wonder if you were duped by the recent election campaign. or maybe just consider that your greed is good for a few quid whilst the going is good, and stuff the country, not your problem.

    The Libs have already lied, with the tax cut deferral. 1, and counting. Mind you they were smart enough to not actually make any significant promises, so that they would not be forced to break any!

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      They are doing a review now of retirement income so guessing they will look at it and cut if able to get away with it. If they could lie so efficiently during the election, why would anyone believe anything they say.

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      well many on here will be happy if the franking credits goes for those who do not pay tax.

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      Don’t feel too sorry for the old folk should the Libs decide that the deal is too good. Most of them and no doubt many of their families voted Lib in full knowledge that retirees are a soft target. Choices have consequences.

    • 0
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      Well Janus someone commented on another YLC’S topic today that KPMG advised the LNP to look at Franking Credits and Negative Gearing as Australia cannot afford thwm.

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      It will give some savers a chance to get investments out of the ASX and into foreign markets .

      Franking credits don’t come but capital gain is greater because companies reinvest profits for growth instead of paying them out in dividends.

      Franking credits will probably be cut for non taxpayers and that should include all non taxpayers not just one select group with other groups quarantined.

      If loss of income forces an influx into Centrelink then pensions may be cut or the family home included in the asset test.

      Wishing loss on others comes with consequences.

      When did we become so nasty and spiteful and why?

      Nobody fussed when hundreds of thousands of retirees lost their incomes in 2016/17. In fact many were glad. It’s a free for all now after that success by Government. Anyone is fair game and grandfathering dead and buried.

      Here we see that same nastiness against our own.

      We redistribute $120 billion to welfare. It’s enough if people live within their means .

      A full list of tax concessions, rebates, levies etc and looking at each may be needed if we really want a recession and it seems we do.

      A surplus in a drought in Australia has always caused a recession. Always.

  8. 0
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    The refunding of tax collected by the government and refunded at tax time so that a company is not DOUBLE taxed is not free money, it’s not a gift and it’s not charity. I’m starting to wonder about the motives and qualifications of the people that run this site. there appears to be no fact checking a lot of the time. I was forced to buy shares when I sold the family home to downsize in retirement. The Government doesn’t allow me to put these funds into my Super fund ( industry fund ) as I can’t pass the work test. So the options were Bank interest 2.8% or shares that pay dividends around 5 – 7%. I chose shares ( not in an SMSF ) owned as an individual. I would prefer that the government doesn’t tax these dividends at all and it becomes income to the shareholder who then sorts out his own tax liability at tax time, a bit like the rest of the world does.If I hear the word gift or free money I will freak out. The other inference in this article is that shares always rise in value, well they don’t so there is risk involved as well.

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      True.

      The other way out would be to not include pre taxed dividends as income for tax purposes. That would also eliminate double taxing of these investment returns.

  9. 0
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    The refunding of tax collected by the government and refunded at tax time so that a company is not DOUBLE taxed is not free money, it’s not a gift and it’s not charity. I’m starting to wonder about the motives and qualifications of the people that run this site. there appears to be no fact checking a lot of the time. I was forced to buy shares when I sold the family home to downsize in retirement. The Government doesn’t allow me to put these funds into my Super fund ( industry fund ) as I can’t pass the work test. So the options were Bank interest 2.8% or shares that pay dividends around 5 – 7%. I chose shares ( not in an SMSF ) owned as an individual. I would prefer that the government doesn’t tax these dividends at all and it becomes income to the shareholder who then sorts out his own tax liability at tax time, a bit like the rest of the world does.If I hear the word gift or free money I will freak out. The other inference in this article is that shares always rise in value, well they don’t so there is risk involved as well.

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      I am fully with you on this.
      Ask myself the question why this extension of the labor movement in the form of this “your life choices” is so far left from the left.
      Anything promoted by the right side of politics is always criticised.
      They will promote taxing the people who earned it to give to the people who did not earn it.
      Not that I am against helping the needy, but object giving it to no hopers!
      Don’t they realise that the shareholder is taking a risk in investing their money into an industry which gives employment and gives in turn income to them. But sometimes a company goes broke and the sahreholder loses all.

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      Bazza51, don’t worry, it’s not the ABC. You don’t have to fear them any longer. Ita Buttrpse was appointed to be the Chairperson by Morrison to shift toward a very biased right-wing Murdoch voice.

      The truth can be dangerous as Julian Assange has shown, especially when most media is run by Murdoch who has no moral conscience.

      I suppose you will put in a complaint about the journalist because the truth does hurt.

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      If that is the way you feel about YLC’S BSYCK I don’t know why you bother to visit this site.

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    I already knew all this. As stated on other topics my brother worked on the pre polls in Qld and young and old were stating that ‘Grandma won’t be able to buy Xmas and birthday presents.’
    People are now aware for sure and are seeking these shares that attract franking credits. What’s bad about this is it will force the government to review franking credits because they are about to blow out massively.
    Just remove the term, ‘franking,’ and allow it to pass into history.
    People should be warned not to rush in and organise their money around this because it is not sustainable.

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      AEC RESULTS: First Preference Votes;

      Labor 4,524,457
      Liberal 3,548,653

      ‘Hardly a “Wipeout” for Labor. The Rest by Lies and Deception’

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      0

      Where would the Libs be without the Nats to back them up and hopefully next time around Clive Palmer will have finally learned that Australians do not want him in Parliament.

    • 0
      0

      Yes Misty, the Libs would never get in if they stood on their own like Labor do. They have to have a Coalition of Cretins to get back in.

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