Only one in five expect to live comfortably in retirement

Just 19 per cent of Australians expect to be able to live comfortably off their super.

Aussies fear super shortfall

New research shows just 19 per cent of Australians with superannuation expect to be able to live comfortably off their super in retirement.

The research conducted by UMR Research also found that 43 per cent of people expect to retire with a total amount under $200,000 in their superannuation account.

YourLifeChoices’ own research paints and even bleaker picture, with 22.96 per cent of retired members reporting that their standard of living in retirement was worse than they thought it would be.

YourLifeChoices is currently running its annual Retirement Matters Survey and we would love to hear your thoughts on how comfortably you are able to manage your retirement.

The research, which was conducted to gauge opinion on freezing the superannuation guarantee at 9.5 per cent, found that Australians overwhelmingly rejected the proposition.

The increased reliance on the pension as a result of freezing super contributions was a big concern, with two-thirds of people surveyed (66 per cent) worried that everyone would end up footing the bill because the Government will have to support more people on the pension.

Nearly 70 per cent of Australians backed the system as a safety net, like Medicare, that provides an essential service to those who need it.

Industry Super Australia chief executive Bernie Dean said the research showed Australians were keen to see the superannuation guarantee increased.

“Australians are rightly concerned about their retirement and whether they will be able to make ends meet,” Mr Dean said.

“Freezing the super guarantee will force Australians to work longer and increase the burden on the pension.

“Our superannuation system was established to provide a safety net for working people in retirement and it must be protected.

“Any attempt to wind back the scheduled increase or undermine compulsory contributions would fly in the face of community sentiment.”

What do you think? Have you already retired? Are you living comfortably off the money in your super? Have you completed the Retirement Matters Survey yet?

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    COMMENTS

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    Intellego
    30th Jul 2019
    10:14am
    It becomes increasingly apparent that what is needed is a universal pension. Fat chance of that happening under the hopeless LNP...
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    11:29am
    I'll be putting the plan for that to Reichsmarschal von Frydenburg of the SS (Social Security) for him to pass down to the likes of Gruppenfuhrer Jonge ...

    All ideas and contributions welcome.
    Sceptic
    30th Jul 2019
    12:02pm
    What a silly comment. The current Superannuation scheme was introduced by the ALP.
    VeryCaringBigBear
    30th Jul 2019
    12:12pm
    Only the wealthy benefit from a universal pension.
    VeryCaringBigBear
    30th Jul 2019
    12:13pm
    Better to give it to anyone who wants the pension and then it becomes a debt on their estate.
    Not a Bludger
    30th Jul 2019
    12:32pm
    No need to be nazi offensive to the Treasurer, Trebor.
    Triss
    30th Jul 2019
    4:12pm
    Oh, not again, Big Bear. We are supposed to live in a democracy so if there is a debt on an estate it must be on everyone's estate. If you've ever been in a public hospital, if you've ever had a health card, child benefits, maternity/paternity leave, unemployment benefit...everything paid to anyone that has directly or indirectly come from the taxpayer, including ex politicians' pensions and perks. And remember, pensioners are also taxpayers.
    Captain
    30th Jul 2019
    4:31pm
    VCB, if there was a revamp of our tax system, a universal pension could be paid to all at age 65.

    All earnings above the pension could be taxed at $0.15 cents in the dollar.

    A revision of the tax system, to make it more simple is relative easy. The average tax paid is currently about $0.17 cents. Hundreds of major companies currently pay no or miniscule tax.

    Fix that and watch our national debt begin to go down. All to difficult for our current crop of idiots in Canberra.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    7:05pm
    That's assuming all the leeches get to not pay tax on all other earnings, fringe benefits, and gifts from companies etc, BB.

    As for von Frydenburg - I have Jewish ancestry so feel safe in making a point about attitude....
    Rae
    31st Jul 2019
    9:55am
    Yes captain that would be a great idea.

    Right now people are not encouraged to save for themselves as they lose the aged pension and concession card by doing so as well as having to go without when they are accumulating savings.

    Many choose to upgrade homes over and over to lock up wealth which is becoming a big issue now for younger families and for those who chose this without considering how they might maintain an expensive home on a pension. Lost opportunity to save into productive income generating assets as well.

    It's a real mess of a system.

    I was forced to save large after tax sums for compulsory contribution which made raising a family very hard and now I miss out on the concession card because I saved and pay full costs on a decreasing income. That is pretty unfair in my mind as I also paid a lot of tax as well.

    There is no equity and the retirement system doesn't make sense.

    Even today 50% of workers earning the median income or less won't have enough super to live on according to the stats and are paying 15% tax that they should not have to pay just because the system doesn't fit reality.

    A universal pension and all other income taxed at ordinary tax rates would eliminate the inequalities and the distortions that prevent both saving for retirement and earning money in retirement.

    If the LNP are real about having a go and getting a go they will fix this mess so we can all have a chance of the same go happening for us all.
    libsareliars
    31st Jul 2019
    12:49pm
    Well said Captain and Triss. A universal pension and tax paid on anything earnt over that.
    Captain
    31st Jul 2019
    3:43pm
    As I have stated before, I discussed this with my Federal MP and also the Labor candidate before the last election and the looks from both were "what are you saying? I think that would be too difficult".

    The changes in tax would possibly affect those cretins in Parliament adversely, so why even discuss it.
    GeorgeM
    31st Jul 2019
    9:18pm
    Intellego, agree with your first statement about having Universal Age Pension, but want to point out that there is NO chance Labor will ever implement that, so the best option is NOW when a Retirement Incomes Review comes up, to push hard for it. Retirees are 20% of the electorate and MUST make themselves heard by DEMANDING such change from the Govt directly and through all forums you use.

    Good comments from Captain and Rae, although (re: Rae's comment) I would support a capped level of Super (say $600K) to be allowed as a Concessionally taxed portion being a Govt-encouraged saving tool meant to supplement funding for retirement.

    Captain, our own MP also had NO interest, and avoided the topic by simply saying they "can't afford it". No brains, and no reason to do anything as THEY don't have a say in the party. So, the better option is to target the Treasurer and PM with any suggestions, supported by funding suggestions - including use of the 7.5% taxes still being collected for welfare including pensions, massive cuts to Cemtrelink costs, increase in taxes from increased employment from seniors, and action to rein in tax loopholes say by a sweeping measure such as Minimum Taxes to ensure no one escapes by paying Nil or Negligible taxes.
    Captain
    1st Aug 2019
    6:18pm
    GeorgeM, he IS the Asst Treasurer.
    GeorgeM
    1st Aug 2019
    8:56pm
    That's sad - to have such a dope in that role! Nevertheless, when they deny you, go higher! Most Retirees have time, so don't give up (maybe use threats from Retirees to unseat him at the next election) - you have written some good points.
    YLC have also told me they will put up a petition for the Retirement Incomes Review, however the more people who write the better to flood them and create pressure.
    Dave
    30th Jul 2019
    10:18am
    It is great that we have 9.5 % super guarantee and it is going to rise, but back in the day we put some of our own money into super which will make for a better retirement.
    Ted Wards
    30th Jul 2019
    11:02am
    We can do both those options now Dave but the trouble is most of us don't have the extra money. It's often a case of this or that and which one is immediately important. Of course, both are important but there is no guarantee of tomorrow so the immediate often takes precedence.
    Sceptic
    30th Jul 2019
    12:06pm
    It has been forgotten that the original plan for the Super contributions was to be by the worker forgoing a wage rise for it to be put into Super as the contribution. This morphed, as was probably Keating's original plan, into employer-funded contributions. Quite correct Dave, that people can make a sacrifice in their day to day living and make extra contributions. I did exactly that and have been retired 20 years now, and living off the results of those sacrifices.
    Sceptic
    30th Jul 2019
    12:07pm
    I meant to say, quite right Ted, not Dave.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    7:04pm
    Exactly, Sceptic, which is why it dawned on me, years later, that I was being short-changed by working up to 100 hours a week and only being paid super on a basic working week. Part of the hourly pay, so it should have been for every hour...
    KB
    30th Jul 2019
    10:31am
    A universal pension for people over 50 a good option for people who cannot find work and may need to consider retiring earlier than planned
    Farside
    30th Jul 2019
    11:54am
    A big plus if more people over 50 had option to take early retirement and go on to UBI or pension is the extra opportunities in the workforce that would be created at all levels. This would result in more promotion opportunities and reduction in unemployment.
    Paddington
    30th Jul 2019
    10:40am
    What one person considers a good standard of living and another can be vastly different. Maybe, have a list like how well you eat, if you skip meals or even run out of food. Another one would be if you can afford holidays and break this into overseas, local, family, etc.
    Drinking alcohol is personal and many don’t bother with that. Going out is also personal. Some don’t care if they do, others need some connection outside of the home.
    Many on here seem to travel but poorer retirees have no option to do that.
    So, what is a good retirement? It would be like saying how long is a piece of string.
    Maybe the question should be: Are you happy and contented in retirement?
    Ted Wards
    30th Jul 2019
    11:05am
    I myself am 12 years away from my official retirement age of 67 however, I have been working for 35 years and want to retire early so I am making plans now and have already put them in place. I know there will likely be no pension or only a part pension so I am not relying on it at all. I think those who have never worked that are in their 50's, for whatever reason and are already on a welfare payment will be better off.
    Tanker
    30th Jul 2019
    11:18am
    A universal pension is a nonsense in this country. The only ones pushing for it are those who are likely to be in a better position that the average person who in fact already qualifies for an age pension.
    It appears that too many are listening to the vested interests who declare a totally over the top income is needed for a comfortable retirement. There is a huge difference between a comfortable retirement and a luxury one with eating out and overseas trips the norm.
    Unfortunately too many retirees expect to be able to live on their investment returns without touching their capital. Get real people there are a lot of people out there who really do struggle to heat their house and get goods food on the table. Too many are doing a Barnaby Joyce and imagine they are doing it tough.
    Paddington
    30th Jul 2019
    11:24am
    Hear, hear!
    Well said, Tanker.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    11:32am
    Depends how it's implemented and what tax on other income is associated with it....

    I imagine most if not all politicians, if given pension and then taxed on income over and above etc, would end up paying more than they received in pension.... just saying...
    Sundays
    30th Jul 2019
    1:07pm
    People who refuse to draw down capital but cry poor need a reality check.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    7:06pm
    But if you draw down capital you end up crying poor............
    Rae
    31st Jul 2019
    10:04am
    Entirely so Tanker and one of the reasons that they brought the cashless welfare card in so that money would go to heating homes and good food rather than to less essential spending.

    Most are not doing it tough at all but there is no equity in the system.

    Nothing is being done to help the less fortunate cope and learn strategies to make life easier and savers are being punished by having all support withdrawn.

    It distorts saving into unproductive accumulation and still does not fix the ongoing problem of strugglers not being able to manage their income at all.
    GeorgeM
    31st Jul 2019
    9:27pm
    Tanker's comments are complete nonsense, has been made before, and comes from a jealous person who can't stand others (who saved) living better than him! Such jealousy will result in dividing Retirees into groups, which Liberals and Labor love to exploit, and ultimately Retirees will be the losers, including the pensioners who over time will find that their pensions may get reduced to Newstart rates. That's the likely outcome if Retirees don't use their collective strength to speak for ALL retirees, and DEMAND Universal Age Pension now with no more Govt interference in the eligibility rules. If you don't want any change to the current system, go away and go to sleep, and just don't complain when you get hit as above.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    11:28am
    Ask yourself:- In twenty year's time how much will today's dollar be worth in real terms?

    There's your answer.... the costs of living including the REAL ones that push wages and outgoings higher and higher - like privatisation of power, roads, gas etc and certain other utilities - have accelerated the never-ending spiral of COL rise = upward pressure on incomes = COL rise = upward pressure on incomes... ad infinitum.

    It's a losing game no matter which way you toast it - UNLESS either one or the other of incomes and COL are stabilised and halted -the trouble is that when such attempts are made, the focus is always on limiting incomes, not costs... and the results are plain to see - just a greater need for greater income once the 'moratorium' stops, and the chase goes on again at a higher pace...

    Don't forget this skyrocketing escalation between COL and income for the INDIVIDUAL took off once the feminist revolution had its way and the Mandatory Dual Income Family (MADIF) of two individual incomes became the yardstick for rendering costs.. so in order to compete the single person had to have a higher wage, which flowed on to the dual incomers, and so the chase never ended and never will.

    The ONLY thing that will stop this mindless chase will be the total downfall of the economy...

    Point being - no matter how much you put away in super, unless you are on the finest wicket like a politician or crony, and have it adjusted every year (indexed) to retain its spending power - you will one day fail through lack of funds.

    Remember Keating's then-fabled $300k in the super fund... now it wouldn't buy you Mars Bars for every grand-kid on call.... @ 10% return it will give you $30k, usually for a couple, and that $30k will rapidly become less able to purchase Mrs Bars, until the day arrives when you can pull your year's super and buy a Mars Bar.
    Farside
    30th Jul 2019
    12:02pm
    Keating's vision was for super to supplement the aged pension throughout the decades it would take for super balances to accumulate sufficient balances to fund a comfortable retirement.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    7:10pm
    Yes, it's only been 25 years of a 52 year working cycle, and Fat Joe started bleating about it while he still felt safe to be in Australia... total idiot.... you need to let it work a full cycle UNINTERRUPTED BY UNEMPLOYMENT AND ALL THE OTHER DEVASTATIONS SO RIFE THESE DAYS, for it to become anything meaningful.

    It's all well and good to mandate splitting super in the event of divorce - in most cases that makes two poor people instead of one in retirement and two relying on pension or a large part thereof.

    All policies have unanticipated consequences (outcomes - you choose your buzz word for today).... like affirmative action for forty years and now the whine that by working fewer hours some are less well off in super - as if the answer is somehow to just maybe hand them a lump sum or mandate that they get all the best paying jobs while the rest languish in the mire below... equality, innit?

    Missed my vocation - saw an ad today for a locum specialist - $2500 a day....
    cupoftea
    30th Jul 2019
    11:29am
    I f the government stopped changing the goalposts we could plan ahead but they change it for some reason as long as we don't benefit as Keating said yesterday they stopped wage rises but not rising the super that is how the super started
    Farside
    30th Jul 2019
    12:56pm
    For the sake of balance it should be noted that government and employers are not the only forces depressing wages and standards of living. The growth of global trade and our integral role in the global economy with emphasis on commodities rather than value added products and our lack of distinctive advantage have greatly contributed to our current predicament.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    7:11pm
    Global economy is a false economy that benefits only the few with their hands in running it... everyone else is just chaff in the wind....
    BTM
    30th Jul 2019
    11:41am
    I was in a defined benefits super scheme which made it fairly simple to estimate my final benefit on retirement, even so I realized early in the piece that I needed to put more than the compulsory 5% personal contribution into the scheme. I increased it gradually every time i got a pay rise until I was putting in 10% and continued doing this for nearly 30 years. I retired two years ago and don't regret making that contribution one little bit, even though it was tough during those high interest years. The bottom line is if you want a comfortable retirement you MUST boost your super with personal contributions or have another investment strategy working in parallel.
    fred
    30th Jul 2019
    12:16pm
    BTM agree one has to invest / top up their super and savings to boost their retirement and and not put out for the Government to pay everything Their are millions of part pensioners taking cruises several times a year just to drive down their assets and increase pensions . also thousands using cash trade earnings that have never been taxed But there are many who will always complain even when we have a generous welfare and health system e.g. free cancer scans
    Paddington
    30th Jul 2019
    3:30pm
    fred, ‘generous’ is not a good word to use for people only on the pension and who no home to boot. It may be adequate for some but not all. Individual circumstances dictate how adequate it actually is.
    Part pensioners with a home and other assets and funds are not in this group. Those that play the system as well and I know a few who are also not in this group. They have two cars which they renew and spend money on a new kitchen to keep their assets and cash down. So sad for those who could do with a bit extra like the single pensioner with nothing.
    Paddington
    30th Jul 2019
    3:31pm
    Also, fred, it will be interesting to see what the government does with their look into income in retirement at the moment. It will be a test of their fairness or lack thereof.
    Sundays
    30th Jul 2019
    6:39pm
    I understand what you’re saying Paddington. However, if we do away with part pensions, I think you will find even more people ‘playing’ the system. Part pensioners in many instances worked very hard to save for retirement. Some pensioners have nothing due to life’s hard knocks. Others, have just spent up big refusing to save for the future. How to tell the difference?
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    7:12pm
    To be a part pensioner means you already have more than double pension as income.... not a bad start....
    Paddington
    31st Jul 2019
    1:35am
    ‘Spending up big’ is a bit of a furphy I think because people who have a lot of money go to restaurants and buy wine etc. and they are fine but someone on a meagre salary has a bit of fun it is supposedly wrong. You can’t work and have no fun. If you work hard surely you can have some money to ease the stress of working. I remember so many years we had nothing to spend on ourselves we called it a deprived parenthood. When we finally got a bit spare we had some outings. The years where we could spend nothing not even a beer were very hard going. So all very well saving for retirement but when you get there you might be too old to enjoy it anyway. Young ones should do things while they can. And many don’t even get to old age. Wealthy people are not the only ones allowed to enjoy life. Low income people have little left to do something with anyway and my advice is to do some fun things while you can. Some of us lose the ability to do that in retirement. I regret not doing more when younger like travelling.
    Sundays
    31st Jul 2019
    7:57am
    Paddington, Of course you should have fun no matter who you are. I was thinking more of friends and acquaintances who were always living the high life, often on credit while we just lived within our means and also tried to save. Now in retirement, those same people are struggling, blaming the Government and keep saying how lucky we are! It makes me cross because we all make choices.
    VeryCaringBigBear
    30th Jul 2019
    11:51am
    Thank goodness we have SMSFs as I would not be using any of the other so called professional funds myself.
    Not a Bludger
    30th Jul 2019
    12:42pm
    Here we go again - self serving Industry Super Australia have one objective only - to get as much union members money under their control as possible and then whack it for as much fee & cost income as possible.
    Of course they will be against the little people taking their own money as a wage - no percentage for ISA (particularly this directors eg Chloe Shorten) then.
    Methinks they are making up this so-called “community sentiment” when many would rather have the cash in their own pocket.
    Tanker
    30th Jul 2019
    2:36pm
    Not a Bludger strikes again. What on earth do you have against Industry Super Funds. They give better return to their investors than any of the-for-profit funds and to state that the unions control those funds and screw their members is totally incorrect. I accept you don't know rather deliberately lie about it but I could be wrong and you sure have an axe to grind.

    Perhaps you are actually the CEO of one of the major super funds who do screw their investors.
    Tanker
    30th Jul 2019
    2:36pm
    Not a Bludger strikes again. What on earth do you have against Industry Super Funds. They give better return to their investors than any of the-for-profit funds and to state that the unions control those funds and screw their members is totally incorrect. I accept you don't know rather deliberately lie about it but I could be wrong and you sure have an axe to grind.

    Perhaps you are actually the CEO of one of the major super funds who do screw their investors.
    Farside
    30th Jul 2019
    6:41pm
    Tanker making jokes .... as if the CEO of anything, let alone a major super fund, is making comments on YLC. Some people have better things to do with their time.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    7:13pm
    Yeah - they have flunkies to do that make-work...
    Rae
    31st Jul 2019
    11:03am
    Possibly was one of those bosses found to be underpaying staff and stealing the super with a million excuses about how hard business is when you have to pat wages and it's the bloody union's fault not that I blew the money on fine dining and luxury utes and other toys to impress the other boys.

    30th Jul 2019
    12:54pm
    Here we go again with YLC telling us about an in-house survey showing a percentage of respondents are "unhappy". No detail about what the questions were or how many responded.Lift your game YLC.

    Is it really surprising that if people are asked if they want more money that they say yes? It could have been mentioned that the freeze on super staying at 9.5% is temporary and will reach 12% some 6 years after the original plan.

    Another item that could have been fully explained is why some people will retire with less than $200,000 in super. Keating's introduction of compulsory super started in 1992 with a figure of 3% so someone who had never had super before that date and is now retired will certainly have a small super fund. The full affect of compulsory super won't be felt until all those who commenced work on or after 1992 will reach retirement age.

    As a matter of interest, when asking the question "Are you living comfortably off the money in your super?", please define "comfortably" because each of us has a different opinion of what that means.
    Farside
    30th Jul 2019
    1:11pm
    good points Old Man but who checks the checker. The author is the Digital Editor so presumably he is the last line to review what is published and what is held back for editing.

    What does "22.96 per cent of retired members reporting that their standard of living in retirement was worse than they thought it would be" actually mean in real terms if we do not know what members thought it might be? Who is to say there is not a large intersection between this group and the UMR finding that 19 per cent of Australians with superannuation expect to be able to live comfortably off their super in retirement? What would have been more interesting is to know if there was a high degree of correlation between the two surveys.

    And as a comment, those who spend their entire post 1992 working lives in low income jobs may find it difficult to live entirely off their super in their retirement.
    Rae
    31st Jul 2019
    11:09am
    Very like the polls we keep hearing about. It's all a crock. You have to judge for yourself carefully about how the economy is going. Right now the retail and hospitality data tells a tale of two cities. The high income and the low income and inequality growing at an incredible speed. How anyone thinks this will end well is beyond me.

    Any poll that asks a random group of strangers questions is unreliable. Real hard data such as quarterly profits and real employment figures are far better.
    retroy
    30th Jul 2019
    1:06pm
    Trebor
    you should publish an apology to the Treasurer.
    To make such an ill considered and hateful nazi characterisation in such a smart alec manner when it is known that Josh's mother was a refugee from the Holocaust, and he is a practising Jew.
    Shame on you.
    80 plus
    30th Jul 2019
    2:30pm
    You and others of your opinion should apologise to The Communists, gypsies, socalists, trade unionists, priests, Russian prisoners of war, Jehovah`s Witnesses and all other non Jewish victims of the Nazis, the Jews have hi jacked the holocaust, This Treasure has stated that Israel can rely on his support in the any debate even when it comes to the brutal Israel occupation of the west bank.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    7:15pm
    I have Jewish ancestry - I made a point about attitude - there are no survivors of my family's name in their home city of Hamburg...

    Get over it...

    Fascist is as fascist does ....
    Watto
    30th Jul 2019
    1:09pm
    Retroy Go and GET STUFFED
    devuman
    30th Jul 2019
    1:28pm
    Watto, what an erudite statement. You must have used both of your brain cells to dream it up.
    geordie
    30th Jul 2019
    1:44pm
    Increasing the super guarantee will just widen the poverty gap. Got to be a better way.
    Farside
    30th Jul 2019
    6:53pm
    does a 'poverty gap' matter if everyone is doing alright?
    Rae
    31st Jul 2019
    11:16am
    Yes it matters. Growing poverty levels is an indication that the economy is not stable. If it continues without resetting historically it ends badly for just about everyone.

    A stable society needs reasonable levels of equality and availability of goods and services.

    Everyone is not doing alright when wages stagnate, bosses rip of workers, we need investigations into banking and ecocide is occurring on a grand scale.
    Chris B T
    30th Jul 2019
    2:14pm
    This is a More appropriate question in 27 or so years Time When All Had The Advantage/Ability of The Super.
    Since It Was only Introduced For All In 1992.
    Until then it's Just Bragging and "Fingering" others not as well off.
    Pension needs/super payouts without any Rules On How To spend is and will be a concern for sometime to come.
    {;-(0)
    Captain
    30th Jul 2019
    4:21pm
    Chris B T,

    I have said for years that the SG needs to be in place until 2036 (about 45 years) before it's full effects can be assessed.

    The LNP budget of 2014 by cigar smoking/wine swilling Treasurer Fat Ass Hockey and then PM Abbott presupposed that after only 25 years of the SG, it was time to reassess the Asset and Income level and put them back to thev2007/08 levels, thus forcing 94,000 to lose their part pension and 374,000 other part pensioners onto a lower level of pension. At the same time as the cuts took place on 01/01/2017, parliamentarians received an increase in their remuneration. That same day, there were cuts to shift workers allowances.

    This was a dog act by the LNP and the Greens, and Labor is no better as they said they would not restore the Asset levels to their 2016 levels. Not one of the political parties are interested in their constituents, only looking after their own pockets.

    That said,when I was about 19 (a third year apprentice) I thought that politicans were not to be trusted and started putting away part of my wages for my retirement. When I retired 45 years later I had a nest egg that precluded me from receiving a pension and I think I am better off not having anything to do with Centrelink or other Government bodies.
    TREBOR
    30th Jul 2019
    7:16pm
    So true, Captain... take two jelly beans....
    GeorgeM
    31st Jul 2019
    9:29pm
    Another good comment, Captain, take two more jelly beans...
    Watto
    30th Jul 2019
    7:57pm
    Devuman Wow erudite My that's a posh word. Where did you learn that one. Listen dropkick I am superior to you in every way Believe you me.
    Watto
    30th Jul 2019
    8:02pm
    Oh devuman nearly forgot Go f*#? yourself.
    Charlie
    30th Jul 2019
    9:23pm
    Good health in later years is everything, without it nothing else matters.
    Paddington
    31st Jul 2019
    1:40am
    Exactly!
    Anonymous
    18th Aug 2019
    5:17pm
    i am enjoying our retirement and still reckon Oz is a great place to do so.