Save money and water with these tips

You can probably save heaps on your water bill with a tweak of your daily habits.

Tap into these water savings

As Day Zero loomed for the drought-stricken South African capital of Cape Town last month, it sounded a warning for all cities whose water supplies are struggling to meet demand.

Normally, it would be unheard of for authorities to suggest that the taps be turned off in a metropolis of four million citizens because water was running out, yet that is what was threatened in Cape Town early this year.

Parts of Australia have also battled diminishing water supplies over the years and many people are still keen to ‘do their bit’ and conserve this precious resource.

And by doing so they are also saving money on their water bill. Australian Bureau of Statistics figures show that in 2013–14, households spent more than $5 billion on water, paying an average of $3.08 per thousand litres. For most capital cities, that is a doubling of the cost of water since 2010.

Have you thought of using the following ideas to save water and money?

1. Turn off the tap when brushing your teeth. Fill a glass with water and use that to rinse your teeth. More than 90 per cent of the water from our taps goes back down the drain.

2. Skip the bath, and shower instead. You need more than 100 litres to fill a bath, whereas a three-minute shower uses half that amount of water. You could also use a bucket to collect the water you wash in and throw it over the garden.

3. Check all taps inside and outside the house for dripping or leaks. A dripping tap can waste  more than one litre in an hour.

4. Consider installing a water-flow restrictor or aerator to all taps in the house.

5. Don’t flush anything other than human waste and toilet paper down your toilet. Some people flush away facial tissues, wipes, cotton buds and even sanitary products. Not only could this lead to blockages, you are also using costly water to dispense of items that can go into your rubbish bin for free.

6. Re-use water from your cooking. If you steam or boil your veggies, don’t throw the strained water down the drain. It can be frozen and added to a soup stock later, or even to water your plants, once cooled down. Water left over from boiling pasta can also be used in your garden.

7. Only use a dishwasher or washing machine when you have a full load to do.

8. If you wash dishes by hand, but not straight away after dinner, rinse them quickly when you take them to the sink so that food does not dry hard on the surface. It will require less water and effort to wash up later.

9. Consider replacing your showerhead with a low-flow version. Standard showerheads have a flow rate of nine litres a minute. Very efficient ones cut that down to five litres, and with the best ones, you won’t even be able to feel the difference.

Do you have any other water-saving tips to share? Does it feel like your water bill is becoming more expensive, despite not wasting water?

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    COMMENTS

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    Rae
    8th May 2018
    10:59am
    Water saving in Australia. Yes keep the carrying capacity realistic.

    Aussies often do all these things but the bills are mostly made up of water corporation costs.

    I pay close tp $1000 a year and only $118 of it is for actual water.

    Right now I don't give a toss. Keep bringing in millions of immigrants and then whinge about lack of water in Australia. Not my problem.
    MICK
    8th May 2018
    1:22pm
    Exactly Rae.
    We use precious little water, pay more than you, and get slugged for an enormous sum. Add on possibly the highest rates in the country and you have government grabbing cash...to be wasted at its whim.
    ozirules
    8th May 2018
    1:47pm
    continuous flow gas hot water systems do no like flow restrictors. A lot of water is wasted waiting for the shower or washing up water to get hot. Also we should have outlawed the sale of new upright washing machines years ago. My machine used 180 litres per load. At 6 loads per week it was using over 56,000 litres per annum. When I changed to a front loader it used 30 litres per wash or 9360 for the year. A massive saving of over 46000 P.A. for one household.
    When I contacted my local MP for a comment I didn't even get a response.
    Dallas1955
    9th May 2018
    8:58am
    My town did run out of water in one drought. I still collect the water while waiting for it to get hot and use it either on my plants or to flush the toilet. I also use the rinse water from the washing machine for the next load or fill buckets to flush the toilet. To me it is not about the money it is about the water.
    zeus
    20th May 2018
    6:28pm
    A grey water diverting device is also very handy and easy to install. Simple to turn on during the warmer months, it just diverts water from the shower/bath and laundry straight onto the lawn or other garden areas. Available at Bunnings everywhere.