Super fund outperforming the pack by a significant margin

One Australian super fund is outperforming the pack by a significant margin.

Super fund outperforming the pack by a significant margin

Of all the super funds in Australia, one is outperforming the pack by a significant margin.

AustralianSuper has posted an 11.08 per cent return for the past financial year – beating the typical return of 9.1 per cent produced by the top 50 superannuation funds.

And this performance is no one-off. AusSuper’s balanced investment option, worth around $140 billion and where 90 per cent of its members have their money, has returned an average annual return of 10.51 per cent over the past five years.

SuperRatings estimates the average returns over the same period at around 8.7 per cent.

With around 2.2 million members, AusSuper is Australia’s largest super fund.

The fund’s deputy chief executive, Mark Delaney, said the drivers for the balanced option’s high performance were more focus on listed equity markets and less on lower-returning defensive asset classes such as fixed income and cash.

According to SuperRatings’ chief executive officer Kirby Rappell, investment in infrastructure and other "alternatives" also continued to deliver good returns for AusSuper.

While AusSuper has performed strongly for half a decade, Mr Delaney is cautious about fund members’ expectations, saying that although the fund has seen a prolonged period of strong growth, there’s always the possibility that future markets could be more less productive.

“Members should always be focused on longer-term results as fluctuations in returns are expected,” said Mr Delaney.

He also said that global markets had delivered better results than everyone expected, with political uncertainty and trade protectionism not having “a sustained negative affect on markets”.

"We will be keeping an eye on key policy-makers, particularly the US Federal Reserve, in relation to interest rates, while also monitoring any action in relation to tariffs or other measures which may affect global trade," he said.

Are you happy with your super fund? Would news such as this encourage you to switch funds?

RELATED ARTICLES





    COMMENTS

    To make a comment, please register or login
    Rae
    5th Jul 2018
    11:08am
    The ASX returned 12.6% for the year so just holding the index at a 0.26% fee beat the fund.

    I saw the figures for fees and charges for the past year and am astounded that people happily pay over 1% and in some cases close to 2% for retail funds that are not producing much in the way of better returns. Anything over 0.5% is too much.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    11:34am
    Rae I thought it was a pretty ordinary return too considering what the ASX returned. I often wonder if these people are professionals then why are their returns so low?
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    11:35am
    Yep
    My fund made me 15% but I have my super invested in a more aggressive profile
    Rae
    5th Jul 2018
    12:01pm
    It has to be that 1% to 2% they are taking in charges plus the insurances.

    Not sure about professionals. Raphael sounds like he has an actively managed fund and that could be worth the fees but most are being passively managed by formula and there is little justification for the excessive charges in my opinion.
    adbob
    5th Jul 2018
    12:07pm
    ... and you get to keep the dividends.

    A lot of financial products are spruiked on how they beat the index - but if you hold shares yourself you get to keep the dividends - that's what you bought them for in the first place (or at least it should be) - not to gamble on the market.

    It generally turns out that the sharepickers who the funds employ on eye-waering salaries can do no better than a monkey with a pin.

    OTOH proving themselves correct (in the short term) is one of the things that contributes to our quoted companies being CEO-ed by criminally minded psychopaths on vast salaries and even vaster bonuses.
    Sundays
    5th Jul 2018
    12:19pm
    People keep money in super for a variety of reasons and are happy with 8-9% return. Low tax environment, to receive an allocated pension, grandfathered rules where Centrelink treated as exempt income, not having to think about investments, keeping it harder to access for emergencies to name a few.
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    12:24pm
    The normal BS from the government posters. The facts:

    1. Australian SuperFunds is a high performing INDUSTRY FUND.
    2. Returns for the past 5 years have been excellent. See for yourself:

    https://www.australiansuper.com/compare-us/our-performance

    3. Bank interest is currently <3%, the sharemarket is EASY to lose your shirt on and the claim otherwise is rubbish.

    I now put out the challenge to the trolls who claim otherwise to put up or shout up. Last time both of the above refused to come up with answers.
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    12:29pm
    Aw MICK, what does it really matter which funds are doing better than another. Do you keep changing funds to follow the leaders? It's all about personal choice really, not politics.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    12:30pm
    Mick All I'll say is that I would have been very disappointed if my SMSF only earned that return over 1 or 10 years.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    12:33pm
    What does concern me is that with both industry and retail the returns for those collecting a pension are telling me that the franking credits are not being passed on to those on the pension. Is Labor's non refund of franking credits policy an attempt to cover this up? I smell a rat here.
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    12:39pm
    You are posting your normal government sponsored propaganda OG.

    We have been here before. INDUSTRY FUNDS outperform retail funds by a long long way. That is wht the current government is trying to remove unions from their overseer role.
    You can post any amount of BS you like because readers know it.

    The only way your SMSF could have outperformed the index is if you were a good gambler (unlikely) or you invested in real estate at the right time.
    As always I always challenge you PUT UP OR SHUT UP. You never put up. I wonder why.............
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    1:02pm
    Good on you Mick, and you are advocating that everyone votes for backflip Bill at the next election because Malcolm (who donates his entire parliamentary salary to charities including the Koories in Redfern, and the Sydney Children's Hospital), is only interested in the top end of town and is directing all taxes paid by the bottom end of town to the top end, because he is phoney and corrupt. Have I got that right, Mick? Sorry, it is a few days since I have availed myself of your mindless, nonsensical drivel!
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    1:10pm
    Mick I am a terrible gambler as I want to odds in my favour not the other way around as is the case with gambling. Mick the ASX gained 12.8% so add some dividends at say 5% and that's 17.8%. So if you still think your industry fund is performing well then good luck.
    GeorgeM
    5th Jul 2018
    1:16pm
    MICK, thanks for correcting the myths dished out as usual by the Govt trolls. As usual they also don't compare apples with apples, and can't handle an Industry Fund beating the rest I(Retail funds)! Super Funds are not for gamblers!

    Also, Rae is disingenuous in comparing the Sharemarket returns to a Balanced Fund's returns - as she full well knows the latter is a mix of various asset classes (to cater for ups and downs) and for all she knows the shares component in that Balanced Fund could have achieved the same or higher return than the ASX overall.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    1:22pm
    George as I have said many times I would not be happy with the returns of even industry funds myself.

    Nothing in transparent in either industry or retail funds so how do you really know what they are even investing in? I know where my money in super is invested.
    GeorgeM
    5th Jul 2018
    1:34pm
    OG, if you have the spare money to gamble & take risks, and you also have the financial skills to do such investments, that's good for you.

    But, that's not a suitable approach for most people who, given they haven't got the skills or a crystal ball to predict returns, would be much better off investing with professionals - and that's where the best option is clearly a good performing Industry Fund.
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    2:07pm
    Yeah George. The same old government stooges working the crowd. Big Al, Old Geezer, Raphael, etc. Waiting for them to roll out heemsjerk. Been a while.
    I often wonder if we are dealing with one or trolls who post here under a number of names. Will just have to keep the crooked bastards honest I guess and keep calling their crap for what it is.

    Keep up the good work George.
    Adrianus
    5th Jul 2018
    2:45pm
    Raphael, I got 18.7% and that is without some asset valuations. I expect the growth to be minimal when I do the vals next year. So next year should be around the 20% plus mark? Had to make some hard decisions to get back what I lost during the Rudd Gillard years.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    3:33pm
    George I had my super with the so called professionals in a couple of the best preforming funds but I was doing a lot better myself with the money invested in my name. So I set up a SMSF and invested it myself as I thought I can't do worse than those professionals. I am happy to now say that I retired with very little and have made more money than I ever did since then and now have bucklies of ever getting the OAP. I wish I had retired earlier now.
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    4:25pm
    Looks like the dog dragged in the next government troll. School halls and pink batts anyone?
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    4:48pm
    Mick those were Labor's babies nothing to do with LNP at all.
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    5:49pm
    well done Adrianus.
    yes - i too fared poorly under Rudd-Gillard, but my funds still fared a few %age points over industry funds
    i think with this governments growth policies and tax cuts, 2018/19 will be a good year
    TREBOR
    5th Jul 2018
    11:52pm
    Some fantasies running here....
    Adrianus
    6th Jul 2018
    8:38am
    I'm not looking forward to RBA rate increases, but you can offset that by getting out of fixed securities and increased holding in banks. After getting bashed by the RC and costs of more regulation they have a very good reason to pass it on to customers with a small margin to account for a lack of interest from some big US corporates and pension funds to our money market. Don't know if Trump will keep pushing that line though, so the margin should hold up yield, In my opinion! Strategically, it's in the best interest of the US to see that our banks are solid as they showed when Rudd and Gillard tried to weaken them, the US federal reserve poured $billions into a couple of our banks.
    Rae
    6th Jul 2018
    8:59am
    Adrianus how did pouring billions of dollars through the banks to create liquidity weaken our banks?

    The US Fed did come to the rescue but not immediately as they had their own issues to deal with.

    What would have happened if Swan had not put $900 into all those bank accounts when he did?

    Do you think the banks are any more solvent now that they were back then?
    Adrianus
    6th Jul 2018
    10:22am
    Rae, in your opinion Swan, Gillard and Shorten are the banks' closet friends???
    Or are you saying they unintentionally strengthened the banks' liquidity by giving out $900 to their voters??
    Half of that money did go to credit card debt and the other half went to Gerry Harvey who then had to import more TVs from Asia.
    Swan also pillaged the RBA, which Abbott fixed.
    This RC was also meant to weaken the banks but in my opinion it will make them stronger.
    Rae
    6th Jul 2018
    11:58am
    I think Swan acted quickly to prop up a certain bank that would have fallen over. Ever seen a panic?

    Swan was as close as it gets to being a banker without being employed by either the NAB or Goldman Sachs.

    That $900 flowed around and around until the guarantee cut in.

    Let's hope we don't get that close to a full blown banking crisis anytime soon because I don't have much faith in Morrison as being economically literate or having much idea of history or human nature.

    Everyone is worrying about the wrong thing. Our public debt is quite low even at 600 billion. It is supposed to be used in a recession and especially in a banking crisis like 2008.
    Anonymous
    6th Jul 2018
    12:55pm
    There was no banking crisis in Oz in 2008.
    Our banks were and still are well managed
    Labor pissed our surpluses to the wind and created a mess which we are still recovering from
    Adrianus
    6th Jul 2018
    1:56pm
    Our real problem in 2008 was having a Labor Government at a bad time. Investors and developers put their hands in their pockets. Projects were put on the shelf because everyone knew Rudd was a trojan horse. His job was to get them into government then retire for medical reasons, handing over to the most leftist party in the history of this country. That's what people were afraid of. Economies are underpinned by confidence and hope of reward for effort and risk. A sound economy is not underpinned by raising taxes and then mailing cheques to citizens. Or scaring people by upping the bank guarantee. That caused more problems than it solved. Swan was told at the G20 by the World Bank and the IMF to hand out money to those who would spend it, as were the other G20 members. Australia had more to lose, because we were in a much stronger position.
    Rae
    6th Jul 2018
    3:10pm
    Technically you are correct Raphael. I wasn't around in 1893 but I did lose a house in the 1989 to 92 crisis which was very badly handled by the ALP. Technically 2008 was a global event and we managed to avoid any bad losses or a recession.
    Adrianus
    8th Jul 2018
    8:35am
    I believe that you are not 125 years old Rae. Either way, in my opinion, our banks are headed for a minor liquidity issue. Partly brought on by the RC and possible increased regulation and partly by Trump's encouragement for big US companies to pull back from our money market in favour of their local alternative. Perhaps this could be a blessing for the OAP who may get a better rate on a term deposit as banks compete for deposits? Swan and Shorten have never been a friend of the banks. I could not believe why Swan was laying the boot in when they were struggling during his time as Treasurer.
    Labor = ideology should take precedence over sound policy. In itself that is a policy. So we cant say they don't stand for anything.

    5th Jul 2018
    12:17pm
    Well done to Australian Super. It's interesting that a check on the winners over the past 10 years does not disclose one particular super fund that has been consistently at the top, in fact that honour changes each year. Our super fund has never been on top but has sometimes been in the top 10 but more importantly, it has never been named in the bottom 10. It's swings and roundabouts.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    12:31pm
    Last years winner could be this years loser so chasing returns is not the best strategy. This years loser is more likely to be next years winner.
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    12:40pm
    Here are the 5 year returns:

    https://www.australiansuper.com/compare-us/our-performance

    You are the only loser OG.
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    1:06pm
    Mick, the one sector you continually overlook is the third lot of Super funds - not retail, not industry, but basically non-profit. I belong to one of these (VicSuper), and I think you will find its returns are up there with the best of your beloved industry funds - and my fees aren't being directed towards union propaganda funds. I also believe global warming is BS - so how's that for a daily double!
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    1:06pm
    Well Mick if I am a loser financially I am loving it!
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    1:16pm
    MICK, we will get around to having a beer together but now super funds are off the table along with religion and politics. Unions are OK because all of my working life I was a member of a union. Cheers.
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    2:13pm
    OM - a surprise as I never quite know how to take you. I'll buy you a beer if the current dictatorship is gone no matter who gets elected in their place. At the very least we'll have a democracy again and given the woeful manner in which this lot have squandered taxpayer money and sold us out I am not sure Australians will put them back in. Politics!

    Big Al - you are one sick puppy. If your super is doing well then that is good for you. I do not have an issue with that.
    When you write the normal right wing BS I do have an issue and if you want to talk about propaganda and wasted then go to your government employer and complain because this lot are off the scale. As you well know.
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    3:06pm
    You crack me up MICK, I just love it how you are always advocating that we vote Independent and you want the Coalition out then you post a gem like this "no matter who gets elected in their place". As Australia is a two party political system (basically) if the Coalition doesn't form the government then it has to be Labor. Very subtle.
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    4:23pm
    OM:

    FYI my current preferences are:

    1. Independents
    2. Labor
    3. the drover's dog
    4. Not Coalition

    Do you get my gist? As I have already stated I do not vote Labor but I will do anything to see the current dictatorship which is being set up OUT. So should you if you are the real McCoy.

    Would I ever vote Liberal again? Depends on the candidates, their mission and what the country needed.

    I hope you can respect my integrity for what it is. I AM an Australian first, a humanitarian second and a capitalist third. Yeah I know....strange bedfellows. Not sure if you really want to have a drink with me though!
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    4:30pm
    I guess I forgot to add watch where your preferences go for the senate. The Lower House cartel is fixed but the Senate preferences still available to horse trade....so most Independents go to the Coalition. Beware.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    4:47pm
    Of course you vote Labor Labor Mick
    TREBOR
    5th Jul 2018
    11:54pm
    .... and you don't vote, OG - and so have no say....
    Chooky
    5th Jul 2018
    1:02pm
    Although mine is an industry super fund, the performance is not as good as Australian Super. Would I consider changing? Absolutely!
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    1:13pm
    Do some research first as things are not all ways they way they want one to believe.
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    4:27pm
    Especially where Retail Super Funds are concerned. Avoid those. Run for the benefit of their wealthy overpaid CEOs and returns are woeful.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    4:50pm
    Well Mick I crossed off most in your Top 10 as I have dealt with them for others and I wouldn't invest in them after all the hassles I had with them.
    TREBOR
    5th Jul 2018
    11:55pm
    Yes - Ebergeezer, Rafe and Adrianus consistently earn far more than the stock market..... .........

    Catch my drift????
    Chooky
    5th Jul 2018
    1:30pm
    Hey Big Al. Mal T donates his salary to, wait for it, his own foundation! The Turnbull foundation benefit from tax exemptions for so-called charities but our PM Banker is no star. He is a banker.

    Excerpt from EDITORIAL The Fig Jam Philanthropist
    THE FOUNDATION TAX SCAM

    But it gets even murkier than that.

    The private ancillary fund scheme was set up in 2001 under the Howard Government, ostensibly to aid private philanthropy. However, these sorts of entities are poorly regulated and typically manipulated by the very wealthy for their own purposes. This is because the law only requires 5% of the value of funds like Turnbull’s to be donated per year to other non-profit organisations who themselves hold deductible gift recipient (DGR) and tax concession charity (TCC) status.

    And in reality, the historical average donation from these funds since 2001 has been a mere 8% of value. So where does the 92% go?

    Well, according to ATO Taxpayer Alert 2016/5: Purported tax-exempt non-profit 'foundations' used to evade or avoid taxation obligations, funds like Turnbull’s are at a high risk of tax evasion.

    In 2016/5, the ATO describes a “typical arrangement”:

    'An advisor or promoter assists individuals (participants) with setting up a 'private' 'foundation' which is then claimed to be exempt from all taxes. The advisor or promoter tells participants that, by operating their business or income producing activities through such a foundation, participants are able to 'opt out of,' or disregard the tax system. A small portion of the income that is streamed through the foundation may be paid to humanitarian or social causes, such as through charities, and these payments are sometimes presented as a justification for the foundation's purported tax-free status.'
    David Donovan 28/6/18 IA
    https://independentaustralia.net/politics/politics-display/editorial-the-figjam-philanthropist,11644
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    2:19pm
    What an enlightening expose of criminal behaviour Chooky. Well done.
    I hope you can send off to various media outlets as well as the Opposition leader, who may well be able to use this in the election campaign. Pretty damning if correct.

    Big Al - where are you???? Come on out. Please explain!! This must be a Labor conspiracy right????
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    4:51pm
    Chooky someone is pulling your leg on that one.
    TREBOR
    5th Jul 2018
    11:56pm
    Thank you, Chooky - I learn something new every day....
    Rae
    6th Jul 2018
    9:12am
    Anyone expecting a Goldman Sachs Partner to pay tax has rocks in their head.
    bohanka
    5th Jul 2018
    2:07pm
    I've been working overseas for several years and will soon retire back to Australia. I'm so out of touch with what's going on back home, other than all the rorts and rip offs, that I really don't know what I should do with the lump sum I have accrued.

    I'm hoping that some of the more experienced people here can advise. I have no super to speak of so what should I do? Join a super fund, seek a financial adviser or just stuff the cash in my mattress. I'd be very grateful for any advice.
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    2:29pm
    best to set up your own smsf with the $500k and invest the rest directly in shares and/or real estate
    do not invest in industry funds - your returns will be poor and mostly used to fund the lifestyle of union officials
    Cowboy Jim
    5th Jul 2018
    2:49pm
    Might be best to leave it over there in a stable currency - better than a mattress! Depends if you have plenty do whatever takes your fancy but if you want to access a part pension you might need a bit more head work.
    Seeking a financial advisor would be an idea but do not take them for Gospel either. If you do not qualify for a pension card you might as well retire in Bermuda (no income taxes whatever).
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    3:19pm
    Advice is like a smorgasbord bohanka, take what you like and leave what you don't like. My contribution is because what we did worked for us and that is to find a good financial adviser and see if the advice suits. How to find a good financial adviser? Ask friends and work colleagues for a recommendation. This site has a list of very helpful questions to ask a potential adviser to ensure they are OK but I'm not sure where to find them.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    3:28pm
    Super is only good to you if you need a tax minimisation strategy otherwise invest in your own name.
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    3:49pm
    A difficult answer which is why you might want to see a financial adviser. Without knowing all about your finances this is not a call any of the knowledgeable bloggers on this website could help you with.

    Good luck and welcome home. Be aware the contemporary Australia is likely very different from the one you left. For one thing we have a dictatorship in the process of being set up.
    Maggie
    5th Jul 2018
    3:51pm
    If I were you, I would not take advice from anyone on this site, even if that person can confirm that she/he has the right financial background legally to give it.

    Real ethical financial advisors want to know a lot more about you and your risk assessment before they would dare to offer advice.

    Probably the best thing you could do would be to find a truly independent financial advisor and ask for advice. This can be for a single consultation if that is what works for you, or on a longer term.

    I know it paid me hands down to go that path.

    All good wishes for your return home!
    Anonymous
    5th Jul 2018
    4:09pm
    Good point Maggie, does that include your advice? ?
    MICK
    5th Jul 2018
    4:19pm
    Yes and no Maggie. I recall the media going through the financial planning industry and noting that, at the time, many were snotty nosed young kids with a 6 week course under their young belts. The problem was the cohort was they had never experienced a recession, they had no life experience, they had no life experience and they were often onselling products from players in the space.
    There are financial planners and then again there are financial planners. I'd go with OM's advice earlier and properly vet any planner before you saw them. Also, ask for a fee free consultation and if you don't like the sound and feel of the planner leave early and see somebody else. Of course in your place you may not have any family or friends who use planners so good luck. It's a nest of vipers and user beware is the best way forward.
    Always good to have decent people come back to Oz and you sound like you tick that box. Good luck in the future.
    Old Geezer
    5th Jul 2018
    4:52pm
    Just remember it is far easier to teach some one to do something than do it yourself.
    TREBOR
    6th Jul 2018
    1:16pm
    Give a politician a rort for a day and he lives like a king for one day - teach him to fillet the taxpayer at every turn and he's set for life...

    That what you mean, OG?
    floss
    5th Jul 2018
    6:23pm
    Australian Super is a great fund for the average Australian worker and Retiree.The smart ass greed is good gang will try to down Industry funds, so predictable.
    Adrianus
    6th Jul 2018
    8:48am
    I agree floss, Australian Super is good for the average Australian worker. If the average worker has no interest in a hands on approach, then its as good as any of them.
    Rae
    6th Jul 2018
    9:17am
    Yes I agree floss. The Top Industry Funds all seem to do okay by their clients.

    5th Jul 2018
    8:30pm
    woh, labor mickey(tremor) asking me where I have been lately, well you labor mickey/trebor should know as most of my comments haven been deleted during the night between 12.30 and 2.30 am, guess who was putting up comments at that time? anyhow who cares, as for the returns on your super or whatever, for what it is worth, my thoughts: to trust anybody to look after your money and, unless it is yourself, be aware of the saying " a fool is easily parted of his money " as for the other comments by labor mickey/tremor in this column what else would one expect of a person who let his hatred goes to his brains and one has to feel sorry for those who encourage the old labor hack, wonder if my comment will survive past 3.30am this time!
    TREBOR
    5th Jul 2018
    11:58pm
    Grow up.
    TREBOR
    5th Jul 2018
    11:59pm
    "most of my comments haven been deleted during the night between 12.30 and 2.30 am,"

    Careful, son - the management of YLC have their eye on you - for exactly the kind of stupid post you put up here.

    You're a slow learner, aren't you?
    Rae
    6th Jul 2018
    9:23am
    Best to avoid personal attacks that appear bullying if you want your comment to stay. Personal insults are not okay in discussions or debates.

    Make a point without dragging another individual into it.

    For example your comment here is about being careful of advise.That advisers can be fraudulent and cost you money. A valid point.

    The rest is just having a go at other bloggers. Nothing to do with the discussion.
    Anonymous
    6th Jul 2018
    5:51pm
    thanks Rae, point taken, wonder though how mick/ trebor get away with the insults underlying their comments, must be one law for them and another for us!!
    Anonymous
    6th Jul 2018
    6:09pm
    "careful, son", Your greatest wish and my greatest relief to be able to prove that to be a lie
    TREBOR
    5th Jul 2018
    11:50pm
    Ha, ha - just got into this one. Must be the politician's 'superannuation scheme' - the one where they never even approximate a fair contribution but reap benefit way beyond their dreams for life.

    No way in the world do they receive even the lowly 11% added benefit from their contribution annually.... and they don't even pay for fees and insurance...

    What a beauty!! Unfunded income for life!! On top of being overpaid and over-perked for life.
    TREBOR
    5th Jul 2018
    11:58pm
    Oh.. I dunno... (to the detractors who may respond) ... I didn't draw any distinctions along party lines...

    YOU?
    Rae
    6th Jul 2018
    9:25am
    Maybe we should all pay the fee and run for election. It certainly looks like a lucrative job and an awful lot of immigrants seem to be drawn to doing it.
    TREBOR
    6th Jul 2018
    1:23pm
    Third Worlders learn from the cradle that the road to riches beyond belief is to hold the strings of political power. No different here, which is why all these peasants we import are drawn to politics like flies to horse manure.

    Get a seat and they can become the lord in the castle who once offered their grand-dad three pesatas a week to harvest his olives for two weeks only...

    Where do you imagine this idiocy of part-time casual and the 'boss' as absolute lord of all he surveys came from?

    Sadly - our immigration mix has been flawed for decades now, and at the same time as our own government has been playing women and men against one another - a trap into which mostly the Anglo-Celts have fallen as opposed to the 'traditional patriarchal' types, and thus destroying the essential Anglo-Celtic nature of this nation and its values, as well as visiting generational poverty on many via destruction of accumulated assets and endless in-fighting over the dregs of marriages and homes. Guess who's reaping in the dead homes that go on sale daily as a result of marriage destruction.
    Anonymous
    6th Jul 2018
    5:37pm
    "our immigration etc", love to know what the last comment got to do with the subject of this matter under discussion or for that matter with the price of milk or bread, lack of sleep maybe?


    Join YOURLifeChoices, it’s free

    • Receive our daily enewsletter
    • Enter competitions
    • Comment on articles