Misused words: the top five words used that don’t even exist

How often have you heard these non-existent words used in conversation?

Megaphone with letters pouring out on black background

As a writer, having such respect for words means that I can often be quite precious about them. I love words and hope to treat them with the utmost respect they deserve. So when I hear someone befouling the English language, misusing words or even making them up, it really grinds my gears. Ah well, I s’pose new words’ve gotta come from somewhere …

Anyway, here are the top five non-existent words I hear used all the time. I sincerely hope you don’t use any of them, but if you do, I hope I don’t offend you – it’s all just a bit of fun!

1. Irregardless

Have you ever heard someone say something such as “irregardless, I’m going anyway”? This is the first word of which I thought when I decided to write this piece, because I hear it used so often. People who say it actually mean plain old ‘regardless’. If I ever hear someone I know say it, I always answer with, “there’s no ‘I’ in regardless” and I’m often met with a look of incredulity.

2. Supposably

This one, for some reason, really grinds my gears. It’s almost as bad as saying “arks” instead of ask. Which is why this one is number two and arks is number three. Supposedly, my giving grief to people who say supposably makes me a nit-picking type. But it’s just not a word, darn it!

3. Arks

You’ve all heard someone say “arks” instead of ask. It’s so commonly used that it’s almost accepted as everyday speech. But you know what? Arks are something in which biblical animals travelled during the alleged flood, so if you ask me, people who arks for stuff shouldn’t receive a thing. At least not until they can speak properly (pronounced ‘prop-er-lee’, not ‘prop-lee’).

4. Brang/brung

Brang, brung – wrong! If this word wasn’t constantly brought (which is the correct past tense word for bring) to my attention, it probably wouldn’t bother me so much. But brang and brung is so often used as the past tense of bring that it’s actually listed in the Macquarie Dictionary as a non-standard word for ‘brought’.

5. Expresso

Having worked in the coffee industry for many years, “Gimme an expresso mate” was barked at me so often that I ended up becoming used to it. What I found funny, though, is that some people with whom I worked  – who should’ve (not ‘should of’) known better – would also say expresso.

When I first heard it when people ordered their coffee, I would make sure that I said “here’s your ESPRESSO sir” when I gave it to them. But after a while I just gave up. So, the next time you order your coffee, ensure that you ask for an espresso. I promise you, your barista will unconsciously make you a better coffee, because when they hear your order, he or she will concentrate on grinding your beans instead of their teeth.

In closing, I thought I’d put forward ‘chalant’ as an honourable mention, which I don’t hear a lot, but is a line from a very funny Christmas film called The Hebrew Hammer:

Chief:

Well it's good to see that you can be so nonchalant about the whole thing.

Hammer: (Thinking)

I guess I could be chalant about it, but then again I'm not even sure if that's a word. Listen, Chief, we could stand around arguing all day, but I got a case to crack.

Do these words grind your gears as much as they do mine? Or am I just being precious? Do you know of any misused or non-existent words not listed here exist? Why not share them with our members?





    COMMENTS

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    Shep
    11th Mar 2016
    10:29am
    Yes, one makes me cringe cringe "in actual fact"
    Happy cyclist
    11th Mar 2016
    10:35am
    I hate that one too Shep. Also when I hear 'the real facts' I know I will be getting quite the opposite.
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    1:51pm
    I must admit Shep, that cringe is not one of my favourite words either. Kind of sounds like fingernails on a chalkboard, so I guess it does its job!
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    1:51pm
    addendum: at least it's a real word though ...
    Happy cyclist
    11th Mar 2016
    10:33am
    I hear you Leon! I too hate those 'words' you mentioned, particularly 'should of'. But I do love Chillax. Sorry, but I do.
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    1:50pm
    your avatar screams 'Chillax' Happy Cyclist!

    11th Mar 2016
    10:58am
    The substitution of "bought" for "brought" and vice versa, "filem" rather than "film", "Satday" rather than "Saturday", and "think" rather than "thing" may also bring chills to your spine, Leon. "I am 'going to go'" rather than "I am going" is another tooth grinder.
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    1:53pm
    Oh yes Fast Eddie. I've never liked the whole Tuesdee, Wednesdee, Thursdee either...
    pixii
    11th Mar 2016
    10:59am
    I can't think of " anythink " at the moment but I'm sure " somethink" will come to mind
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    1:52pm
    Oh yes, the old substituting the g for a k thing... Nice (not!)
    morrowj1122
    11th Mar 2016
    11:16am
    Yes, Gordon Ramsay always says "somethink"!!! Very annoying.
    Anonymous
    11th Mar 2016
    5:36pm
    I would only expect as much.
    happyjoe
    11th Mar 2016
    11:32am
    have 'yous' done this latey, shame on you
    Ginty 01
    11th Mar 2016
    1:40pm
    I always baa at that one
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    1:54pm
    Oh yous...
    Anonymous
    1st Nov 2016
    6:46pm
    My step grand=daughter says "me and her"....I cringe every time but it is not up to me to say anything...she is 30 years of age and will not change now.
    Gecko
    11th Mar 2016
    11:38am
    I get frustrated with the meaningless use of "it's". If people only stopped to expand the abbreviation with "it is" then they could see how silly its misuse is
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    1:54pm
    I must admit, I do see that a lot... It is annoying.
    lebaber
    11th Mar 2016
    11:44am
    Absolutely!, all of the above, but my most "cringe-worthy" would have to be in the classification of "unique", as in " most unique, very unique, almost unique".......eeerrrrggggggghh
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:00pm
    I just had a brief discussion with someone about the use of the definite and indefinite articles before the word perfect too. That's a whole other kettle of fish...
    Ageing but not getting old
    12th Mar 2016
    1:50am
    Hmm; could you use the term 'almost unique' to describe something like my surname: It was a changed name (we believe) sometime in the 1800's, when one of my ancestors went from Russia to a Western European country and thence to the USA. We've done some checking and cannot locate anyone in Eastern Europe or Western Europe who has the surname; except for me, all of them are in the USA; I'm the only one in Australia. All up, less than a dozen still alive....would that make me in Australia 'almost unique?'
    Anonymous
    12th Mar 2016
    4:19am
    Nope. Don't think so.
    Spud
    11th Mar 2016
    11:46am
    Annoying uses of the English language


    • 7.30 AM in the morning ----- tautology

    • Use of thinK instead of thinG

    • Done ‘good’ should be ‘well’.

    • The future is ahead of them ---- where else??

    • Backstop behind the whatever ---- where else??

    • Use ZEE instead of ZED.

    • Skedule??

    • “Unique in the world “ “very unique” -- there are no degrees of uniqueness!

    • Take or have a listen – listen is a verb not a noun!

    • Furtherest --- Yuk.

    • Pronunciation of TOUR --- TOOA??

    • The use of Quick instead of Quickly.

    • Interchanging amount and number – number of individuals – amount of “stuff”.

    • “Yes, No, I mean, You know – usually indicates a lie following.

    • Feeling under par – should mean feeling good not bad.

    • Misuse of “er”and “est” Fewer of two, and Fewest of many.

    • Important being pronounced “imporDent

    • Botanical instead of botanic
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:01pm
    Great list Spud! I'll come to you the next time I need some inspiration for one of these articles!
    Chat
    11th Mar 2016
    2:58pm
    "Feeling under par – should mean feeling good not bad." This only applies if you are a golfer. Par means average so if you are feeling under average you are feeling bad.

    Pronunciation of Kilometre ---- the problem has just shown up with the spell checker wanting me to misspell the word as Kilometer. A Kilometre is a measure of distance based on the Metre. It is not a measuring instrument called a Meter.
    It should always be kilo-metre and not kil-ometer.
    JAID
    11th Mar 2016
    5:04pm
    Kilo-metre, Chat. Would that one have turned over? My guess has Kil-ometre (short 'o') now the more common.

    All of the above bring a smile for their commonality.

    A range of unnecessary suffixes also abrade. A good example is not coming...perhaps, words like "orient" which take suffixes unnecessarily or, incorrectly. "They orient East." They orientate East". I think of Pooh Bear. If he ever found East no doubt he would helpfully correct his or her orientation.

    Some people seem to have an incapacity to handle the sounds involved. One person I know is aware that "filum" is not correct and has tried to say 'film' under tutilage without success.

    Spud mentioned "skedule" that is one that irks me but which can be heard in specific circles so regularly that I wonder if it is not appropriate use in particular sub-culture. Overall, these errors (or incoming stanards) are so common that if we allowed ourselves a "cringe" at each we would not be happy travellers.
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    5:05pm
    A great list Spud.
    Well, it is, at least, the 'tip of the iceberg.

    English is a strange and for some, a difficult language.

    You sound like one of those with whom a weekly English language discussion or debate would be most enjoyable.
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    5:55pm
    Great list, Spud. Think yous all should definately bookmark this.
    FrankC
    30th Jan 2017
    1:20pm
    yep agree spud, schedule, I've heard pronounced shkedul, mostly by americans (should be shedule ) but then they can't spell kilometre correctly because they don't obviously know the difference between the two, at the same time we hear some people in the media mispronouncing Kilometre as kill omiter. We say millimetre, and centimetre (* I love it when windows tells me I haven't spelt the word correctly hahaha) so why not kilometre.If the ABC and 95% of channel 7 can pronounce it correctly, why can't the rest,( We will omit the incorrect pronunciation of medical terms,; I have twittered Kay McGrath on the correct pronunciation of 'Cervical' , (didn't include meningococcal , no-one gets that right). And the other phrase that gets me is :"one of the longest,- one of the largest, one of the best,--- there is only one longest, or largest,or best,-- etc ,etc, you can't have a collection of longest, largest , etc.
    sandyfaye
    11th Mar 2016
    11:49am
    Secetry instead of SECRETARY.
    brought instead of BOUGHT (courtesy of my ex husband)
    Yous instead of YOU.
    Robert
    11th Mar 2016
    11:53am
    And now we live in Austraya.
    Ginty 01
    11th Mar 2016
    1:43pm
    Or Straylia
    JAID
    11th Mar 2016
    5:08pm
    Or indeed Ginty:

    OR_ StrAlia

    Are some of these versions of the nation's handle taught in television reporter school?
    mitchbleakheath
    11th Mar 2016
    11:54am
    Also, American love of adding syllables to create new words: e.g. transportation for transport. Now morphing into transportating goods, goods were transportated and transportational logistics. This leads on to Warehouse managers becoming logisticians (and sometimes logicians). Even ABC journalists can't say nuclear (perhaps we should all give in and say nukerla).

    Culled from texts from my children: verocious (nasty or vicious), extong (very long), ballcock (a tautology), chipolatta (flat white coffee with a bowl of chips and tomato sauce) and a castratto (weak decaf cappuccino made with skim milk).
    Anonymous
    11th Mar 2016
    8:04pm
    Or those Americans fro the South who add a vowel where no addition is necessary. Instead of Shit, it becomes Sheeit.
    nev37
    11th Mar 2016
    11:56am
    "Nucular" instead of nuclear, from people who should know better, like G.W Bush for one!
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:20pm
    I would estimate that I hear 'nucular' around 30 per cent of the time the word nuclear is spoken... I've even heard a nuclear physicist say it!
    yellownanna
    11th Mar 2016
    2:41pm
    I had to try hard to pronounce it incorrectly!!
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    6:46pm
    Listen here LEON.

    You have set the cat amongst the pidgeons.

    I have missed the news.
    My pets are waiting for their dinner.
    The garden requires watering.
    And now, my mind will be whirring all night.
    FrankC
    30th Jan 2017
    1:24pm
    So did I yellownana
    Sadie
    11th Mar 2016
    11:59am
    The one I hate is ÿouse
    Anonymous
    11th Mar 2016
    8:41pm
    The (correct) English language is actually sadly lacking a distinct plural form of "you". It's common in other languages.

    "Youse" has its place.
    wicked
    11th Mar 2016
    12:13pm
    Oooh yes, and more. Anywho , Esserdon are two that I constantly hear. And of course......nothing is better than.......Oh and the best one - police enforcing speed.
    talofa
    11th Mar 2016
    12:17pm
    I don't mind weird words so much as the way US-socalled English is murdering the English
    language....talofa
    wicked
    11th Mar 2016
    12:18pm
    Oh I forgot - definately......... that one really makes me cringe.
    minnie orb
    11th Mar 2016
    12:32pm
    "could of " makes me cringe every time. And its even used by people who went to university?
    FrankC
    30th Jan 2017
    1:32pm
    And that is used in literature, Minnie orb. You would have expected the editors to have picked that up . When I first came across "could of " I couldn't believe it. We are talking past tense, a derivation of 'could have' .
    Bookworm
    11th Mar 2016
    12:50pm
    Me hubby's prostrate is playing up.
    Shouldn't mock the uneducated, but I am almost prostrate with laughter when I hear this (which, unfortunately, is quite often).
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:20pm
    Too funny!!
    wicked
    12th Mar 2016
    1:02pm
    Oh yes...... as an ex-nurse it crack me up very time
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    12:58pm
    I done that.
    Would you like a samwich?
    DefinATEly ... grrr .... should read 'definITEly'.
    SatAday!!
    Yes, 'irregardless' must top of the list!! Arrrggghhh
    'Vegie' should read VEGGIE
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:21pm
    I have the vegie/veggie argument all the time. I'm afraid that I think it's vegie. From what I can gather, veggie is American. Each to their own on that one though, you see it both ways all the time...
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:23pm
    Even better than a samwich is a sambwich!
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    4:51pm
    Biddi, I cannot agree with 'veggie'. The word 'vegetable' has only one 'g'. Why in abbreviation would it become a double 'g"?

    I wonder about the abbreviation for refrigerator. Mine is 'frige'.
    Some insist on 'fridge'. Why the letter 'd'? It does not appear in the unabbreviated word.
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    5:39pm
    Brainstraina : I think it's something to do with the preceding
    vowel 'e'. It becomes a long sounding 'e' if the 'g'
    consonant isn't doubled.
    To me, 'vegie' would be pronounced /veegie/.
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    5:45pm
    PS. I favour 'fridge'. Someone who is cold is sometimes
    called 'fridgid'. Or is it 'frigid'? Lol
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    6:00pm
    Yes biddi, the word is 'frigid'.
    It can all be a bit of 'lol' can't it?

    I further studied your 'veggie' but; for me the 'gg' sound as in 'leggy' with the 'gg' being a hard sound.

    However, in some cases, I say 'Each to his /her own.'
    So let's agree to disagree.
    Friends??
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    6:09pm
    Always friends, brainstraina haha x
    Anonymous
    11th Mar 2016
    8:06pm
    Sorry brainstrains but to use your idea, refrigerator would be shortened to "frig" which some find unacceptable.
    Alexia_x
    11th Mar 2016
    1:02pm
    Oh yes! I hate so many of the misused words and expressions here! The main one is putting an R when is none there, as saying "drawring" instead of "drawing" or again putting an R at the end of some words, as in the name Eva which many pronounce as Evar.
    What the heck is wrong with this language in this country? SO MANY THINGS!.
    I also hate it when people say 200% or 110 percent or any other higher than 100 as there is no possibility to account for more than 100 when it means a percent (per 100)
    To me these expressions indicate a very low degree of culture or education in the individual using them and the "should offs" and the "Satdays" and the "avos" are really agravating.
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    1:10pm
    Rofl!!!! Hahaha
    It's called the 'vernacular'.
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:22pm
    Classic wrap-up Alexia_x! I must say, I don't like the r's after w's either...
    JayUK
    11th Mar 2016
    4:59pm
    I thought it was only here in UK that the spoken language was going downhill and that I was the only one it bothered. It's almost a comfort to read that I'm not alone.

    Can I add FebRuary ...it's not FebUary

    Athletics ....it's not AthAletics

    foliage .....not foilage
    JayUK
    11th Mar 2016
    5:03pm
    And yes AlexiaR ....I too hate the way an R is added to the end of some words!
    JAID
    11th Mar 2016
    5:40pm
    Good one Alexia.

    Still, a percentage depends on the reference amount. If ones pension was 200% this year compared to its datum of last year's level I doubt they would complain.
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    6:29pm
    Alexia_X. You have brought up a little bug-bear for me.

    It's not so much about language but; with given names.
    Examples which come to mind are the good old Russian names such as
    Nadia. Natasha. Sasha.
    For some strange reason, the parents (obviously Australian) have inserted the letter 'r' after the letter 'a' to make sure the sound will be an 'ahhh'. Nardia. Natarsha. Sarsha. These names sound 'ah' anyway without changing them so drastically.
    In many languages - even some English - that 'r' would be pronounced and making those names sound ridiculous.
    Perhaps for some, the long aaa has a classy sound.
    The name Sasha is a man's name, originating in the Baltic states like Latvia, Estonia, Lithuania and also Russia and some of the Balkans.
    It is (would you believe!) the abbreviation for Alexander. (I did see that during the Australian Open a Russian-born young man having residency in Germany and playing for same whose given name is Alexander but; is known as Sasha. He also explained about the abbreviation.)
    Back to the 'r' letter. Some Aussies seem to think that without the 'r' the sound will be altogether different.
    FrankC
    30th Jan 2017
    1:56pm
    Brainstraina, I see nothing wrong with the those Russian names .There seems to be a continuing problem in the inability to pronounce foreign names correctly. The classic one we hear all the time, (here in Qld anyway) is the pronouncing Cilento as Silento. (I cringe every time ) Diane Cilento married Raphael Cilento, who was Italian, therefore her name is pronounced Chilento. Why can the Brits pronounce this correctly and we can't? I think it is disrespectful to pronounce a name incorrectly. An example is in the Italian word 'ciao', ---how is that pronounced ?!! Our trouble is that we are so insular, and isolated from Europe, that nobody gives a rats arse about correct pronunciation of a name that isn't spelt Warne, or Ponting, or Lewis..This was borne out many years ago when I mentioned to a young work colleague in the medical field that she wasn't pronouncing an Italian name correctly, and her reply was "Oh well it's near enough" ! I rest my case.
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    1:05pm
    'vetran' = veterinarian
    Now this one bugs me, said by 'journos' .....
    Less versus fewer

    Wow, I love this!!!!
    Roses
    11th Mar 2016
    1:05pm
    Haitch instead of aitch....
    Roses
    11th Mar 2016
    1:05pm
    Haitch instead of aitch....
    mitchbleakheath
    11th Mar 2016
    1:28pm
    Depends whether you went to a Catholic or a Protestant school.
    JAID
    11th Mar 2016
    5:31pm
    Which school got it correct Mitch?

    I ask because I have heard 'h' more often among catholics but when young was sent for elocution lessons after hours to a catholic school. Sent there also for piano lessons where fingers were trained with rulers; that they held elocution classes may not stand for a lot.
    mitchbleakheath
    12th Mar 2016
    10:25am
    I'm a bit dim in the brain now, but from childhood memories of my parents pointing out that you could always pick a Catholics by how they pronounced the letter h. It was a very sectarian time when such differences were important.
    Anonymous
    12th Mar 2016
    10:33am
    Pretty sure it was haitch for Catholics and aitch for Protestants.

    Both groups knew that they were right.

    This was in Victoria up to around the 1970s.
    JAID
    12th Mar 2016
    3:07pm
    Mitchb... and Barak. Thanks.
    HOLA
    13th Mar 2016
    8:41am
    I went to a Catholic school in the late 50/60's and we were always told to pronounce the letter "aitch" and not "haitch". I'ts not important for today. What gets in my goat is when you hear people, usually on the T.V. using the word "amazing". They cannot say a sentence without using that word. I was watching the show "The Living Room', and all of them used that word , multiple times. Gee it's irritating.
    scorpio
    11th Mar 2016
    1:13pm
    Two spring to mind -
    1. "more/most importantly" instead of just "importantly" or "more/most important"; and
    2. when a team/player or whatever needs e.g. 2 goals/points or whatever to win, and the comment is "within 2 goals/points for the win". This crops up also when there is a specific time frame for an event, not necessarily in the sporting sphere.
    mitchbleakheath
    11th Mar 2016
    1:25pm
    I just remembered another doozy heard on the ABC: operationalise (ANU vice chancellor on radio national 13/10/14).
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:23pm
    Oh no!!
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:24pm
    That one kind of reminds me of 'conversate'. Another one I've heard spoken by a US politician (I can't remember the name right now) is 'misunderestimate'... I'll leave that one with you!
    Emby
    11th Mar 2016
    1:44pm
    MischievIous instead of mischievous. It doesn't end with an IOUS. Eddie McGuire used it last week on "Hot Seat Millionaire". (Very cringy, and that's not a word either!!)
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    2:35pm
    Dear Eddie does have a problem pronouncing some words.
    But he makes up for it with his humour :)
    Definately.
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    5:50pm
    MischievIOUS. Yes, bell.palm.
    This word is all over the place. Sometimes, from where it is least expected, like journalist, commentators, news-readers, hosts etc.

    I don't believe we expect too much from the aforementioned. Some of them are university 'educated', are they not?
    Perhaps we should expect more of the 'educators'.

    Prior to their employment, those typing the headlines on the screen beneath the newsreader or commentator would surely be assessed in their knowledge of the language.
    Yet, someone in authority is allowing them to be publicly read as being lacking in their grasp on the English language.
    pixii
    11th Mar 2016
    2:10pm
    These days we all have spell check ,sometimes should be used here , as it is
    Aggravating ,,,, double g letter , sorry Alexia
    BtL
    11th Mar 2016
    2:25pm
    I'm surprised that someone hasn't mentioned the disappearance of the present tense of the verb to lie (down). I'm always hearing "do you want to lay down", "lay down here", "will you lay with me in a field of stone" (one chook talking to another?)
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:56pm
    Admittedly, that one gets me all the time...
    leonYLC
    11th Mar 2016
    2:56pm
    I'd be lying if I said it didn't!
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    6:42pm
    Yes, Btl. I've heard people saying that they are laying down.
    I'm guessing; maybe eggs?

    I would like to mention 'escavate', how about 'anaethetist'.

    AGHRRRRR.
    wicked
    12th Mar 2016
    1:10pm
    ooooh... I used to work for them.........anaesthetists...
    yellownanna
    11th Mar 2016
    2:34pm
    My two least favourites & the two most guaranteed to have me gnashing my teeth are -
    1." Reca-nise" instead of "recognise". It has a "g" in the middle!!
    And
    2. "Impordant" instead of "important". There's no "d" in important.
    Farside
    11th Mar 2016
    2:48pm
    Additions to the list:
    loose instead of lose (spelling)
    eckcetra instead of etcetera
    foul instead of fell e.g. fell swoop
    mute instead of moot e.g. moot point
    sticky
    11th Mar 2016
    3:09pm
    I hate the use of, "engolfed," instead of engulfed. I hear it used more often than not on the TV news by the presenters and reporters.
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    4:18pm
    Leon, I am so glad that there are plenty of others out there who are driven crazy by the constant use of mispronunciation, terrible grammar and a real ignorance of the English language.
    ALL OF THE ABOVE AND MANY, MANY MORE.
    Is English grammar no longer taught in schools?
    We all watch and hear the news on TV and radio. We read books and all manner of periodicals.
    Every day, many times, we see in print or hear - collective singulars followed by plural verbs, such as; in cricket, Australia ARE winning or, the team ARE partying or, the pair ARE being fined or, the couple ARE being married.
    In the distant past, I sometimes read a 'women's' magazine. No more! I found myself spending hours reconstructing sentences and becoming thoroughly annoyed with the ignorance of the authors.
    Then, there are the sentences ending with a preposition. It's hard to believe that Jeffrey Archer is very guilty of this. (I read with a pen in hand for the purpose of making corrections.)
    My favourite past-time, reading, is at times quite irritating.

    I do relate to all the preceding comments today and now feel somewhat more relaxed in the realization that there are many others with the same gripes. THANK YOU ALL.
    mike syngen
    11th Mar 2016
    3:34pm
    "These ones" instead of "these",
    Likewise, "those ones".

    And then there is the poor, much abused, apostrophe!
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    4:28pm
    Oh, Mike!!!
    Don't start me on that bloody 'apostrophe'.

    It's everywhere!

    I often relate to friends or family the day - many years ago - I went to the opening of a new Safeway store in coastal East Gippsland. In the vegetable section was a hand-scrawled sign on the peas reading 'Pea's'.
    I was annoyed.
    So, I took a Texta pen (for which I later paid!) to correct this.

    Mike, you should always carry a thick marker pen.
    JAID
    11th Mar 2016
    5:19pm
    'them ones"

    Perhaps sadder Mike?
    geofftuke
    11th Mar 2016
    5:28pm
    I saw a sign once which said something like "It,s only on special today"!!
    Left me hoping that the poor apostrophe would recover from its comma!
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    5:52pm
    How about a 'Sataday Special'? .... no kidding
    Alula
    20th Mar 2016
    5:05pm
    Ban the apostrophe altogether - too many poor souls are incapable of comprehending how to use it. At least then the rest of us wouldn't have to worry so much about our blood pressure.
    bandy
    11th Mar 2016
    4:08pm
    The one that makes me cringe is when people say "orf"instead of of
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    4:32pm
    Hey, Bandy.
    Don't forget "off of". It is one of those 'Americanisations' of the language.
    I don't wish to start on those. It would take all night.
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    6:51pm
    I meant to say Americanisms and not Americanisations.

    Even I...!! have been known to make the occasional error. It was some time ago.
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    4:41pm
    LEON, I am very happy to hear that you are a 'nit-picking' person. I would like a dollar for the times I've been called this.
    It's great that you've brought up the subject. It is not talked about often enough.
    Doolan
    11th Mar 2016
    5:08pm
    Congradulations on your article Leon.
    This mispronounced word is heard often on ABC radio by one of the announcers.
    btony
    11th Mar 2016
    5:15pm
    briyyiant :-)
    JAID
    11th Mar 2016
    5:16pm
    Our age is showing.

    Not one reply has mentioned 'like'

    "Thats like really like mega. Like, I wouldn't like, like go near it'

    Very useful
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    6:05pm
    Hahaha .... gives me the 'irrits' Jaid.
    How about 'that's really cool, YEAH, must get one, YEAH, get paid next week, YEAH .... YEAH'
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    6:54pm
    Like you said, it's like really annoying and like sometimes I could just like scream.
    Shez
    11th Mar 2016
    5:41pm
    anythink and yous
    Jenk
    11th Mar 2016
    5:51pm
    To be pacific, oops specific, Plate up, pot up etc or is that excetra?
    Reversing back in the car or starting to stop.
    And don't get me started with " all of a sudden" ...
    brainstraina
    12th Mar 2016
    1:09am
    Jenk - maybe excreta.
    biddi
    11th Mar 2016
    6:11pm
    This has gotta be one of the funniest posts ever on Your Life Choices!
    Thanks, Leon!
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    6:56pm
    Yes, LEON. THANKS.

    I will show some of these to kids and grandies.

    They believe that I know nothing.
    Anonymous
    11th Mar 2016
    8:50pm
    biddi - Not quite right there. You have just made a post in a thread.
    Desiree
    11th Mar 2016
    6:34pm
    I seem to be hearing it more and more. The word "Like" Young people use it nearly every 5 word. Makes me cringe.
    Gammer
    11th Mar 2016
    7:07pm
    So agree with these posts...

    I also hate 'assume' pronounced 'ashoom' and I am particularly offended by comments about people such as "The woman THAT attended..." when it should be "The woman WHO attended...". 'That' refers to things not living, breathing entities.... I hear examples of this in news broadcasts all the time which probably helps to perpetuate and increase its misuse. There was a time when good English was mandatory for journalists and news readers....

    11th Mar 2016
    8:09pm
    And "pled". This is so annoying because no such word has ever existed. The past tense of "plead" is "pleaded" and those illiterate English mashing Yanks have a lot to answer for. If they kept it within the boundaries of the good ole US of A I wouldn't mind but we now hear it on our TV news.
    brainstraina
    11th Mar 2016
    11:48pm
    Hear, hear Old Man.
    bobbalinda
    11th Mar 2016
    8:12pm
    My pet hate is the use of the word of instead of have. Makes me cringe! I would of, I should of etc, hey people have is a verb, of is not so please use the verb!
    Anonymous
    11th Mar 2016
    8:57pm
    "Should of" arose from people incorrectly de-abbreviating "should've".

    (Is de-abbreviate a word?)
    Trish
    11th Mar 2016
    8:33pm
    Agree with all these comments! How about knowan for known. Also, the use of literally - 'I literally died of fright', etc. Hmm, so how are you telling me about it??

    11th Mar 2016
    8:52pm
    So one that annoys me is the use of "honed in on". And why is that word "so" used so often at the start of sentences?

    11th Mar 2016
    8:54pm
    I far too often see the sport of triathlon described, even in print, as triathAlon.
    geofftuke
    11th Mar 2016
    9:19pm
    And what about "front the court" That,s just crim slang for face the court. Oops, there goes that pesky apostrophe again - lapsing into a comma!
    Troubadour
    11th Mar 2016
    10:00pm
    Oh so many - my husband and I absolutely hate people putting letters in
    words that should not be there - such a saying GROWEN 9or GROWAN) it is
    GROWN - no E or A - same goes for KNOWN. So many announcers on TV say this.
    Soapbox Diva
    11th Mar 2016
    10:10pm
    My pet peeve is using 'myself' instead of 'I' or 'me'. I received a letter today that ended with 'If you have any further questions, please do not hesitate to contact myself on (phone number).' Grrr! Wanted to break out the Nikko pen, correct it and send it back. Might still do it yet.
    Another phrase that grates is '(number)-year anniversary'.

    11th Mar 2016
    10:35pm
    I object to the modern pronunciation of deeeee-fence and offf-ence, straight from American basketball.

    I note too that flying foxes have turned into zip lines.

    And I take great care to spell gaol and paedophile correctly.
    brainstraina
    12th Mar 2016
    12:07am
    Barak, your post reminds me of a friend who incorrectly says many words including a simple one like 'sammich'.
    This friend finds the word 'profiteroles' a tongue-twister and instead says 'paedophiles'. It could be amusing on hearing the dessert order.
    FrankC
    11th Mar 2016
    11:32pm
    One that bugs me is "SHKedule"The trouble is people don't bother to look at the word before saying it, but it will not change. Another is the name of a children's hospital up here in Queensland. They call it Lady silento hospital'. The lady's name is Cilento, it was named after Lady Dianne Cilento, whose husband was Raphael Cilento. Therefore her name should be pronounced correctly as Chilento, ,'Ci' in Italian is pronounced Ch as in church. But the media start it all because they cannot pronounce a foreign name,m be French, German, or Italian, and whatever they pronounce, then everybody thinks that is correct. How sad.
    FrankC
    11th Mar 2016
    11:41pm
    And of course , that perennial, "one of the largest" ,"one of the smallest, , oldest, highest" etc. There can only be one highest, one largest, one smallest , etc etc.
    FrankC
    11th Mar 2016
    11:46pm
    And has anyone noticed how the backward Americans pronounce, "Israel" ? They pronounce it 'Isreeall",-- weird.
    brainstraina
    12th Mar 2016
    1:06am
    You are quite right FrankC regarding the Italian pronunciation of Cilento being 'Chilento'.
    However, in the past 40-50 years in Australian interviews, she was usually referred to and answered to the 'Silento' pronunciation. It was not ever corrected by her.
    As for 'schedule' / 'skedule'; the latter is another of those unfortunate American pronunciations.

    I do believe I'll have a nightcap. Perhaps a small Cinzano (Chinzano.)
    Anonymous
    12th Mar 2016
    4:14am
    My wife went to school with one of the Cilentos back in the 1960s, and pronounces it as if it's Silento.

    Maybe the family uses a different approach from "perfect" Italian. There are many different dialects of the language spoken in Italy.
    Ageing but not getting old
    12th Mar 2016
    1:53am
    LEON: for #1; why not also use 'irrespective" as in 'irrespective of the fact that.....' That's what I prefer to do.......
    Anonymous
    12th Mar 2016
    4:16am
    I suspect "irregardless" is simply a stuffed up hybrid of "irrespective" and "regardless".
    oldtimer
    12th Mar 2016
    4:28am
    A trend which is driving me mad is the increasing conversion of nouns into verbs.
    I increasingly hear sentences such as "Joe was stretchered off the field" or "Joe medalled in the last Olympics"
    Anonymous
    12th Mar 2016
    4:42am
    Yes, and it's not just nouns. One of the most gruesome corruptions in that league is footy fans who have turned "versus" into a verb, in sentences like "We verse Collingwood next week." (I really don't know if "verse" is the correct spelling of that non-existent word.)
    BC49
    12th Mar 2016
    5:52am
    An absolute ^5 on all of those, particularly the "irregardless" used a lot in Australia, along with "Pacific" for "specific". I have to bite my tongue several times a week on that one!!
    Tricia M
    12th Mar 2016
    7:38am
    "Pacifically" instead of "specifically' is another common one. Yes,Happy Cyclist, should of is also a horror!!
    bobbalinda
    12th Mar 2016
    8:15am
    Another for me is men's prostrate problem instead of prostate and bronicol for bronchial.

    12th Mar 2016
    10:35am
    The written abbreviation of advertisement appearing as "add".

    Where did that extra d come from?
    oldtimer
    12th Mar 2016
    11:09am
    More irritable word uses. The words "any time soon" instead of soon.

    Also the dreadful American word 'gotten'. I hear it so often that I have become (NOT GOTTEN) accustomed to it.
    1945 yorkie
    12th Mar 2016
    11:41am
    Most of the ones already stated really annoy me,especially Americanisms such as 'palletizing' apparently meaning to put something on a pallet.Another really common one,especially heard on TV is 'Yeah,no...'.It can't be both,really annoying.
    Sandi (SA)
    12th Mar 2016
    12:26pm
    The misuse of the words LOSE and LOOSE. Happens a lot on YLC.
    Also the saying "YOU KNOW"
    BC49
    12th Mar 2016
    11:26pm
    And the lovely: "like" interspersing any sentence innumerable times, "I was like blah blah blah..." and I hear older people doing it!
    Big sister
    12th Mar 2016
    1:07pm
    You've all missed the most cringeworthy of the lot
    Your going to love this. Aren't students taught "you're" any more?? I see it everywhere. Our local laundromat has a sign saying "Your going to have the cleanest laundry!" Grr!! I also have as friend who insists on saying she "rung" me. Another Grr.
    Anonymous
    12th Mar 2016
    3:06pm
    I refuse to say CON-TRO-VERSY. Pleased to hear an ABC reporter not say it this way recently.

    Also the spelling along the bottom of news reports can frequently be incorrect.

    Also hate hearing people say "me and her or him and me"!

    Obviously grammar is not given much attention these days.
    Annie
    12th Mar 2016
    8:41pm
    Has anyone mentioned 'much more'? "makes me blood boil dontcha know?'

    13th Mar 2016
    8:48am
    "Oh my god!"
    dingo1
    13th Mar 2016
    9:34am
    Should have went instead of gone, ugh.
    Ange
    13th Mar 2016
    9:56am
    I really dislike the US pronunciations creeping into our vernacular.
    ceremony cere-moan-y
    offensive offf-ensive
    defensive deeee-fensive
    research reeee-search
    dual doo-all
    Also dislike TV and radio presenters referring to children as kids
    Anonymous
    13th Mar 2016
    9:57am
    Americans can't even pronounce "Melbourne" correctly.
    Ageing but not getting old
    16th Mar 2016
    3:47pm
    BARAK: Jack Black pronounced it properly when he was on the 'Today Show' a few days ago! Americans who travel a fair bit, and/or see a lot of TV from Australia will also know how; likewise, those of us who have lived here for a while will learn quite early on. If you live in W.A., and hadn't seen much of American TV, or read about U.S. geography, might not know the proper pronunciation (e.g. how they say it THERE) of the Capitol City of New York State, Albany. If you pronounced it 'Al-ban-ee', you'd be wrong; it's pronounced 'All-ban-ee'. It's all relative...
    Jenk
    13th Mar 2016
    11:43am
    After having a laugh and a cringe at the comments posted, I decided to check a few things with SIRI. The standout? When I pronounce the word "culture" correctly, Siri asked "call to ... Who do you want to call?" In order for Siri to understand that the word is "culture", I had to pronounce it as culcha. What can I expect when Siri cannot spell my name correctly anyway.
    Clee
    13th Mar 2016
    12:44pm
    Two more things that makes me angry:

    1. people saying "different to" instead of "different from". In school, we were always taught that it is "similar to" but "different from".

    2. the incorrect use of "their" and "there", eg it was their choice to put it there.
    BC49
    14th Mar 2016
    1:32am
    We're & where... I wonder if other languages in the world have this same problem... :)
    BC49
    14th Mar 2016
    1:32am
    We're & where... I wonder if other languages in the world have this same problem... :)
    Ozetwo
    13th Mar 2016
    5:02pm
    "Expresso" means " I want a coffee and I WANT it quickly" just arks anyone :)
    Johnny
    14th Mar 2016
    11:15am
    Oh how I love this!!
    1.Austraya-a la Josh Frydenberg, Anthony Albanese, Tim Fischer, Steve Bracks, etc
    2. Fooball-I think the lost "t" has become extinct
    3.Substituting "agreeance" for "agreement".
    4.'Youse' for 'you'
    Anonymous
    14th Mar 2016
    11:24am
    Youse might sound bad to you, but it has its place. Nice English doesn't have a distinct plural form of "you". Other languages do.
    biddi
    14th Mar 2016
    12:20pm
    Hey Guys! You forgot to mention this one, BUT
    toptony
    14th Mar 2016
    1:18pm
    My pet hate is pergola .An Italian word it should be per-gul-a not per-go-la.
    Pyotr
    14th Mar 2016
    8:48pm
    Just come on board . . . this is such fun!

    The young compere on a TV show always said: ". . . and if you repeat nancer, you'll hear this sound", but it seems to have been pointed out to him and he now clearly (and obviously) states: ". . . if you repeat an answer . . ."

    But no-one seems to have mentioned to the photographer on another show that 'pitchers' aren't photographs.

    And don't criticise the apostrophe. Think of all those poor pickled herring merchants!
    Anonymous
    14th Mar 2016
    10:56pm
    Thunk, who would have thunk?
    How I dislike "thunk"
    Not Senile Yet!
    15th Mar 2016
    1:49am
    HI LEON Della Boska.......what a subject...eh what?????
    Of course I hope that you do understand a simple fact about Australian Culture.....namely the game/sport of Raping the correct British English as much as humanly possible......just for fun!!!!
    Glad you were not around 30-40yrs ago......because if you had been and went say to the horse races......you would not have understood a word!!!
    Total Slang was fashionable....even more so to the toff's in suits and ties....you know...the upper crust!!!! LOL!!!!
    Observation of your pet hate........get a sense of humour mate!!!
    Because it was absolutely quite intentional to abuse the English language by the Working Class.....to poke fun....Why?????
    Because people like you judge those who by circumstances beyond their control...were denied access to a proper education!!!
    Meanwhile I do enjoy what you and others have highlighted,,,,,,,but can tell you have never been to the top-end...eh what?
    Trimcat
    15th Mar 2016
    2:35pm
    Incentivise!!! TV announcer at 8pm "I'm back at 10 for all the news"
    Infamous, when citing something positive!
    westozi
    19th Mar 2016
    5:26pm
    centred around instead of centred on.
    Alula
    20th Mar 2016
    5:22pm
    The "England" team - what happened to the English team?
    SKRAPI
    23rd Mar 2016
    8:37pm
    Stralyan instead of Australian arst in place of asked dident & wouldent instead of

    didn't or wouldn't pitcher for picture.

    To name just a few.
    Margaret Thompson
    1st Apr 2016
    2:34pm
    *sigh* I'm a grammar pedant. I loathe "aks", writhe in pain at "supposably" (which one hears frequently now on television news), and am in complete agony when people (mostly my fellow Americans) us "drug" instead of "dragged". What's happening to us? If this is the English language evolving, I think I'll try to learn Esperanto.

    1st Nov 2016
    6:44pm
    Re brang/brung...heard on TV other night "BRANGED"...I find it appalling how badly many people speak these days.

    Why is this not being picked up at school...or are the teachers as bad??
    Miss Piggy
    27th Jan 2017
    1:23pm
    The "amount" of people who "only know" one "chune" from the musical ...
    This character is "in-TEG-ral" to the story.
    That film is "actually" the first one I "actually" saw. Then I "actually" saw it again when I was "actually" in Spain".
    His house was "destructed" during the storm.
    Will he try "and" fix it this week?
    A "bunch" of dogs attacked the "bunch" of people "stood" under the tree.
    The shops "is" never open on "Sundees".
    And then there is Abbott's "real" funny one: "dead, buried and cremated".

    I could go on and on.
    Argggghh!!!
    brainstraina
    27th Jan 2017
    7:30pm
    Leon, you are not being precious at all. I agree on each count.There are many, many more. Escavator. This program is 'bought' to you by Joe Bloggs. Assessories. Them ones. Going to go. Mischievious. Vunerable.
    Stomping ground - sh/be stamping ground (originally for horses.)
    I have just read through this long list of posts again and I am so pleased that I am not the only 'precious' one.
    Many incorrect phrases, words and spellings are Americanisations. Very annoying.
    I hear some younger people saying 'should of', 'must of'. It's obvious these people neither read nor write. I attempted to explain these to my grandson and his response was "Whatever."
    Does anyone (apart from Americans) happen to know the origin of 'living life to the full'? This is a 'quote' which, to me, means that someone in the distant past said these words. Sixty years ago, my English teacher absolutely drummed into our heads that it is incorrect to say 'living life to the fullest' because it cannot be more full than full.
    Sadie
    3rd Mar 2017
    6:48pm
    It really irks me when people use äre"for the singular and ïs"for the plural. even newsreaders are guilty of this.
    brainstraina
    4th Mar 2017
    1:49pm
    Sadie, (Had to smile when you wrote "even newsreaders are guilty" -- they are possibly the worst!!)
    I think I know what you mean - when a plural verb is used following a collective singular----------

    The Victorian team are going to Qld for a break, Australia are leading by points,
    The couple are divorcing,
    The Magpies are playing away (yes, I know it sounds strange to say "The Magpies is playing away") however, The Magpies is the name of a team and 'team' is a collective singular which cannot be followed by a plural verb. Also ----

    There's many ways to do this,
    There's more people over there.

    (Is it any wonder that so many of us are going a little mad?) I have friends who don't see or hear any of this unless it's pointed out and then they don't really get it or don't care.

    When a speaker or a writer doesn't like the sound or the look of a sentence, it is easily enough reconstructed.
    On the other hand, it is obvious that said speaker or writer is unaware of the absurdity.
    It seems that not too much importance is placed on our English grammar education. (By 2 or 3 generations.)
    Sadie
    3rd Mar 2017
    6:50pm
    And also when "that"is used when talking about "People" instead of "who"'.
    OnlyDaughter
    8th May 2018
    4:58pm
    Anythink rather than anything; Somethink instead of something. I hear this all the time.
    Gezza
    24th Oct 2019
    11:59am
    What about adding an extra vowel in such words as parapAlegic, athAlete, archipAlego.


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