‘It won’t be a pretty experience when we deal with them’

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The government has set its sights on people suspected of hoarding and profiteering from supermarket goods.

The Australian Border Force and police have launched a joint operation to catch anyone suspected of hoarding and selling essential items on the black market during the coronavirus crisis, reports The Sydney Morning Herald .

Home Affairs Minister Peter Dutton believes initial panic buying of toilet paper and other essential items in Australia was sparked by profiteers.

“We do have some people who are profiteering, they are hoarding not for their own consumption,” he told 2GB.

“I think they are either selling some of the product overseas or they are selling it in a black-market arrangement in Australia. I’m going to come after those people, and I’ll give them a fair warning now: it won’t be a pretty experience when we deal with them.

“If people are profiteering out of a national crisis, then they are going to be dealt with.”

Mr Dutton said he thinks a “highly organised criminal element” is behind the panic buying and profiteering.

“And [we] will come down like a tonne of bricks on these individuals because I think they’re the ones who have created this pattern of behaviour of hoarding and clearing out shelves.”

Mr Dutton said the combined efforts of the Australian Federal Police, Border Force and state police forces would hone in on hoarders selling products on the black market and has asked Australians to dob in hoarders to Crime Stoppers.

The announcement comes on the heels of 24-pack rolls of toilet paper selling for over $100 online, hand sanitiser being sold at five times its normal price, and floor cleaner for six times its recommended price.

Online marketplaces such as eBay and Amazon have joined the government in cracking down on people stockpiling essential products and selling them at grossly inflated prices.

Listings for toilet paper, face masks and hand sanitiser on eBay at exorbitant prices would be taken down from Thursday, says eBay Australia.

“Our teams in Australia and globally are working around the clock to manually pull down hundreds of thousands of inflated listings, but are struggling to keep up,” said an eBay spokeswoman.

“We urge buyers not to overpay for their essentials during this time.”

Amazon Australia has already removed hundreds of thousands of similar listings globally, said an Amazon spokesperson.

“There is no place for price gouging on Amazon. We are disappointed that bad actors are attempting to artificially raise prices on basic need products during a global health crisis,” said the spokesperson.

Consumer advocate CHOICE has urged Australian retailers not to take advantage of the COVID-19 crisis with pushy sales tactics that prey on consumer anxiety. 

Consumer anxiety is being fuelled by ads and email direct marketing calling for consumers to “stock up now before it’s gone” on face masks and hand sanitiser.  

“Australians expect more from major retailers at this time. Using pushy sales tactics to exploit anxiety about COVID-19 to encourage panic buying is not on. These are disgraceful marketing tactics”, said CHOICE consumer advocate Jonathan Brown. 

CHOICE cited multiple examples including a well-known Australian brand – Mosaic brands – using terms such as:

  • “Stock up now before it’s gone”
  • “Limited stock – shop now”
  • “Order now! Limited stock”
  • “Stock up and stay safe”

“The Prime Minister has called for calm. We think this advice should apply to the business community too. We need all brands to be responsible and support the community to navigate these challenges, rather than cash in on fear,” said Mr Brown. 

“We’re actively looking out for businesses that see this as an opportunity to take advantage of people who are worried – through misleading advertising, price gouging or shonky health claims.”

“This ‘panic marketing’ from Mosaic brands was identified by CHOICE members – they are our eyes and ears. We’re asking anyone who sees panic marketing, misleading claims or dodgy practices to report it to choice.community .”

Mr Dutton would like to see a return to sanity and dealing with opportunists taking advantage of the pandemic may be the fastest way to restoring sanity in the wider community.

“We’re trying to deal with this issue and make sure that common sense is restored because some irrational behaviour at the moment, as the Prime Minister has pointed out, is unacceptable,” said Mr Dutton.

“People who are assaulting somebody or involved in some of the footage that we have seen … are going to be dealt with by the police.

“There is certainly a bigger police effort now across a number of sites where we do have concern.”

The minister, who contracted the disease last week and says he has recovered from the symptoms, elaborated on his experience and highlighted the importance of being tested even if you only have mild symptoms.

“I have had nothing more than Panadol, [I] haven’t had a fever since I left hospital and … it’s a heavy flu. And I think that’s going to be the experience for the vast majority of people who catch it,” he said.

Have you overpaid for essential items? What do you think of mass hoarders? How much do you think is an acceptable amount to ‘hoard’?

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Written by Leon Della Bosca

Leon Della Bosca is a voracious reader who loves words. You'll often find him spending time in galleries, writing, designing, painting, drawing, or photographing and documenting street art. He has a publishing and graphic design background and loves movies and music, but then, who doesn’t?

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158 Comments

Total Comments: 158
  1. 0
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    “Home in” for goodness sake Dutton/journo quoting/typist, “home in”.
    Wordsmiths unite against the ignorant.

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      From the Merriam Webster dictionary: “Home in is the more common phrase for figuratively or literally “finding and moving directly towards something.” Home can be verb, referring to “finding one’s way to a destination” such as “homing pigeons” and “homing missiles” do. In the same sense one can “home in on the answer” for example. Hone in is also acceptable but far less common, and comes from the meaning of “hone” referring to sharpening or making more acute. “

      From the McMillan dictionary: “(hone in on something) to give all your attention to something”

    • 0
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      notrov. Seriously? People are fighting in the super-markets, thousands are wandering the streets with dirty bums with no thought of social distancing, people are dying from pasta and rice deprivation (because no-one told them about potatoes) while others are sick from hand sanitizer sniffing withdrawal syndrome; Dutton is threatening to smash our doors down before dawn to raid our pantries and you are worried about the use of the legitimate term ‘home in.’ What does a homing pigeon do? It ‘homes in’ on its target, its home! People of common sense unite against the pedants!

  2. 0
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    As much as I think hoarding is selfish and unfair, what law have these people broken to make the authorities able to go after them.

    • 0
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      I was wondering that myself.

    • 0
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      Yes, bluezbandit, that’s my thinking too. The laws around buying and selling are quite simple, a trader offers something for sale and a buyer accepts the offer and pays for the item. Trade complete, all legal. The buyer then becomes a trader and offers the same goods with a higher price, a buyer accepts the offer………………

    • 0
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      During a national crisis maybe the laws on this type of trading become different, still like to see it though in writing.

    • 0
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      Hoarding is a mental illness and is not illegal.

      Hoarders require psychological help, instead of punishment.

    • 0
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      If my memory serves me correctly I believe the High Court ruled many years ago that price control is a function of state governments not the the Federal Government. However import and export of goods are definitely Federal matters and the Commonwealth Government can put a stop to that. I suspect that most, if not all, states have emergency management laws which may include price control measures.
      I remember an incident a mate of mine witnessed during the Brisbane floods of 1974 (we were driving military truck with loads of supplies into the flood areas) when one enterprising individual with a load of bread and was attempting to sell it at grossly inflated prices, the police had to save him from being lynched. Maybe a little ‘rough justice’ is warranted now, though I do not advocate lynching.

    • 0
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      Hoarding per se is not a crime BUT ‘profitering’ and ‘unconscionable’ conduct are punishable by fines and/or jail time.

    • 0
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      Agree with you KSS – I have no problems with people buying in bulk and hoarding. It is the selling and profiteering that is abhorrent and should be stopped. Like a shop on northern beaches of Sydney selling hand sanitizer for $50 a bottle – THEY are the ones to be targeted. Some shops deliberately withdrew these sought after items until you couldn’t buy them anywhere – then suddenly brought them out to sell at ludicrous high prices.

    • 0
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      KSS, price control was eliminated years ago. It is now up to the consumer to shop around and find the right price.

      Hence for what’s happened.

    • 0
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      hoarding and selling it at exhorbitant prices during a pandemic (in my mind) is nothing but pure GREED and SELFISHNESS in the extreme!

    • 0
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      Horace cope the laws on buying and selling must have wriggle room else buying and selling grand final tickets wouldn’t be subject to scalping regs or am I missing something.

    • 0
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      KSS, The sale of goods is governed by two Acts. If you look at your State’s Sale of Goods Act it is unlikely you will find anything defining buying and selling at a high mark-up as ‘unconscionable conduct.’ The Federal Competition and Consumer Act of 2010 does deal with unconscionable conduct but generally only in respect of contracts. As no contract has been entered into until a buyer has accepted an offer to sell, a court would usually expect the buyer to demonstrate duress to either enter into the contract or to buy. The ACCC does say that any trade that may generally be regarded as unfair is unconscionable but I don’t recall any court cases when bananas were selling at $15 a kilo in the supermarkets during past cyclones when my neighbours and I were being offered $3.00 a kilo by the traders.

    • 0
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      Viking Its a while since I was involved in legal practise which was in the time of the Trade Practices Act of 1974, the forerunner of the Competition and Consumer Act of 2010 but I would generally agree with your interpretation. There have been several more contemporary examples since bananas. For example no action appears to have been taken by the ACCC against water bottlers who were taking bore water (under licence) from water deprived areas, putting it into little plastic bottles and selling it for more than the prices of either milk or petrol. Hoarding has been a noble practice since before biblical times to prepare for and carry communities through periods of shortage or famines. In fact it is practiced in numerous rural communities today and it is most probably a natural survival instinct. Today we call it cold storage. Squirrels do it and probably so do many other animals as did many of our parents and grandparents. The idea of instant, constant availability of all our needs at a local 24/7 supermarket is a very recent phenomenon and is probably still counter-instinctive to many.

    • 0
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      I’m putting together a submission on the lack of an over-arching disaster management body…. deep concern of mine is how much funding for such a thing would be side-tracked into fat salaries etc for seat warmers.

    • 0
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      There is a huge difference between what legal and what is right. if people can’t tell the difference, they can’t pretend to be civilized.
      This government has perpetrated many atrocities against harmless, innocent people on the grounds that what is is doing has been made legal.
      It is up to us to demand that our government learns what is right and what is wrong so that it can legislate for the good of the citizens.
      There should be a raft of laws that automatically come in once the government declares a State of Emergency, these should involve profiteering and hoarding. If you have stocks put aside prior to the declaration fair enough, but once the declaration has been made charges should be laid for these activities.
      This country has lost its moral compass, to look at an immoral action and simply declare Oh well its not illegal is just lazy.

    • 0
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      I imagine the majority of hoarders (in this pandemic) are very frightened people. It is the tiny minority who are profiteering who started the stampede and are now cashing in. They are parasites, the leeches of society.
      Similar to the two corporations who own 2/3 of the water rights in the Murray/Darling Plan, selling it at a profit to family farmers who grow our food. It’s EXACTLY the same thing, but no-one bats an eyelid at corporations, who are not expected to have a conscience. In fact, their only legal obligation is to their shareholders.
      Our society has lost its moral compass indeed, ex PS. It started long before this pandemic, which will be over before we know it IF ONLY PEOPLE WILL STAY CALM AND FOLLOW THE RULES. NO EXCEPTIONS!

    • 0
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      I am not by nature, one to be a rule-follower. That is mainly because I think there are some stupid rules. I only disobey rules if I’m not hurting or cheating somebody else, including businesses.

      But this is really different. For once I won’t question directives, despite politicians exhibiting gross incompetence and stupidity.

      The border into QLD is shut (only from NSW side but not for returning Queensland day-trippers, after enjoying a surf at Byron or Lennox!) and the QLD idiots are having local elections tomorrow. Talk about mixed messages! There are many more COVID-19 sufferers in SE QLD than in Far Norh NSW. There’s no doubt these QLD buggers are spreading it because they’re obviously still in denial about COVID affecting them or their families! Selfish bastards.

      Sometimes I think all levels of government should have a sensible, normal citizen VOICE TO PARLIAMENT to help them get real – they are bloody hopeless! State & Federal. Bite the bullet! Close it down!

  3. 0
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    Starting with that massive amount of baby formula at the airport waiting to be sent to China. 3 ton on each pallet and there is heaps of them. WHY can’t the government confiscate the goods. The airport worker said his wife had to go to 17 supermarkets to get a tin for his baby. RIDICULOUS

    • 0
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      Free market enterprise in a global market, innit? All the joys of living in a country with commercial open borders.

      Anyone else cottoned on to that one yet, and what it means for Australia long-term?

    • 0
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      When the Government allowed the sales of dairy processing businesses to China it was obvious that this would happen. These companies pay cheap prices for the milk and ship out the value added produce such as dried milk, baby formula, cheeses, butter etc.

      Allowing the sale of agriculture ad food production to foreign corporations and governments was pretty stupid.

    • 0
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      The reality of living in an unrestrained Capitalist society. Certain things can be done to restrain profiteering but not under the political ideology current in Australia at the moment. However in Victoria there are Laws that prohibit “scalping” of concert and footy tickets so why not essentials of life?

    • 0
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      The reality of living in an unrestrained Capitalist society. Certain things can be done to restrain profiteering but not under the political ideology current in Australia at the moment. However in Victoria there are Laws that prohibit “scalping” of concert and footy tickets so why not essentials of life?

    • 0
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      Karen, Coronavirus is the downside result of all the joys of living in a country with commercial open borders.

      Commercial open borders are a financial failure.

    • 0
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      jayzaa, we have been having business supply China for some time now. The powdered milk is stuck at the docks because of Coronavirus. We have the dairy industry exporting to China, wine industry, crayfish, seafood and etc.

    • 0
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      Rae, the Government was very short-sighted. All they could see were taxes and ignored all possible risks and downfalls of dairy exports.

      China has always had the upper hand with Australian business dealings.

    • 0
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      JZ This government will not do any thing for the people of this country unless they make on it they will bankrupt this country and then attack our super not theirs but there is to many idiots out they think they get some money and they are great where do you think this is coming from they did not give a sh t about a freshstart person where there is hundreds of people going for the one job starve you will work for nothing

    • 0
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      ok the Chinese are investing through Mengniu in Bellamy’s, Lion Dairy, Masters, Burra etc but they are in no way dominant in the aussie dairy business. Lion’s dairy business has been owned by foreigners (Phillipine, Japanese) for more than a decade and is fourth behind Saputo (Canadian), Fonterra (NZ) and Lactalis (French, previously Parmalat which was Italian). It would be simply to work out which bit is Aussie owned.

    • 0
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      Rae, exporters pay cheap and sell high because Australians have driven prices down by demanding low prices for Supermarket milk.
      Consumer demand has set the price and provided the conditions for this to happen. A good part of the fault is with us.
      We can’t criticise foreign ownership when our own companies refuse to invest in local farms and businesses. What do we say to our own farmers and businesses, ” Bad luck, you can’t find a local buyer who will give you a fair price so youbwill just have to go broke” ?
      If we want to have a free market system, we have to accept the good with the bad.
      We trade at a disadvantage when we trade with the US or China, scale of economy will allways give them tha advantage. If we don’t trade with either our economy goes back to the Iron Age. We are not smart enough or big enough to fend for ourselves.
      We can’t even work out toilet papercshortages for heavens sake.

    • 0
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      PS, supermarket milk pricing has little to do with it. Indeed, arguably the supermarkets have provided some stability to the industry. Our biggest processors export about half of their product overseas as cheese, butter, whey and powders and so compete with the EU, the world’s biggest dairy exporter.

      The foreign owned processors set the farmgate price, which in turn is influenced by these world trade. The collapse in the world dairy price had more to do with Russia banning ag imports from the EU in 2016, collapsing world prices. This was same time as EU increased its production quotas so the surplus milk flooded onto the global market, creating a massive oversupply.

  4. 0
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    If I ever get a chance to deal with Dutton for all the stupidities he has inflicted on Australia since he got into Government, that too won’t be a pretty sight.

    • 0
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      Nice strong words from a keyboard warrior or is that a keyboard coward? Australia is a free country, johninmelb, and you can travel to Canberra to carry out your idle threats or you can stay hidden behind your keyboard.

    • 0
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      Well put Horace!

    • 0
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      johninmelb, you do know that using a carriage service to menace, harass or offend is a crime, right?

      A carriage service is defined in the Telecommunications Act 1997 (Cth) as ‘a service for carrying communications by means for guided and/or unguided electromagnetic energy’, pursuant to s7 of the Act. In simple terms, this could be taken to refer to social media communications, emails, text messages and calls, and it is important to note that this is given quite a broad definition.

      Examples of such behaviour: a harassing phone call could extend from a bombardment of incessant calls or messages, or offensive or threatening content domestic violence, THREATS OF HARM or incessant messaging.

    • 0
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      Yes, KSS. There s too much of that on this forum from the keyboard cowards.

    • 0
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      You lot need to grow up.

    • 0
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      johninmelb, Karma is dealing with Dutton right now.

      You don’t have to deal with him at all. The positive thing about Coronavirus is that it does NOT discriminate and it’s NOT selective.

      It is a lesson for all people to change their values. Don’t be surprised if it destroys Capitalism.

    • 0
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      I guess I should have known all the ratbags here would pile on.

      First of all it is tongue-in-cheek. I’m not likely to be in that position.

      Secondly, I am not threatening him with violence, that would be too good for him. He needs to suffer slowly so he finally gets the message.

      The only way I can do anything is to be in a position of power over him. He’d be given a job on Manus Island or Christmas Island, cleaning the toilets, and serving the incarcerated inmates so he could get an understanding of what they are going through. After that I would put him on the front line in a Border Force uniform and let the general public do their worst, just so he understands what his troops have had to suffer due to undermanning, and endless red tape.

      So get back in your boxes, as the more enlightened people know, violence solves nothing.

    • 0
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      I am not convinced there are many actual keyboard cowards on this site. For sure there are frustrated, deluded warriors far too easily triggered and quick to tap out the words before thinking through their hollow threats. Does anyone besides them really think there is any chance these attention seekers are even capable to carry out their threats? As KSS notes the Telecommunications Act would promptly be all over this if anyone felt the threats to be genuine.

    • 0
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      Let’s not get all hot and bothered, the best way to deal with deceit and corruption is in the Ballot Box.
      But it is not likely to happen, the sheepnwill choose to believe what ever lies that make them feel safe, no matter how unlikely or stupid they might be.
      Thank god we will have the Surplus to sustain us.
      Some of us have been telling people itcwas never going to happen for years, but the sheep will always believe what makes them feel better.

    • 0
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      Johninmelb has not threatened violence, so what are you others on about?

      The mess or not “a pretty sight” he’s referring to might only be a verbal shouting match, hurling abuse. I have seen SO MUCH worse on this very site, even by some of you who have jumped on John.

  5. 0
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    I think this was just a typo as the N and M are beside each other on the keyboard. I am a bit of a stickler for spelling and grammar but I can usually tell the difference between a simple typo and a mistake made through ignorance.

  6. 0
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    I live in a small rural community of around 3,000 people and we’ve had no loo paper on the shelves at IGA for a couple of weeks now. This morning while out walking around 7am I saw shoppers carrying loo paper out of the store, so thought I’ll pop back to the store when I get home, but sadly an hour later the shelves were bare again. I asked the assistant when we’ll be getting another delivery and she said the truck comes 3 times a week to restock so i just have to wait until the next delivery.

    When I hear on the radio, on TV and read the papers they message is don’t panic, we have plenty of everything and there is no need to hoard. Well if there is PLENTY of everything, why can I still not buy loo paper, meat, dog food and milk?

    • 0
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      Why don’t you go to the store at opening time if going later means you keep missing out?

    • 0
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      We stopped using toilet paper ages ago now. We use washable wipes instead as it’s so much cheaper and better for our septic system.

    • 0
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      Rae, I didn’t have any money on me when I was walking earlier. I had to go home and grab my purse before I could return.

      What are washable wipes? Are they chux cloths or something? Assume you’d need to disinfect before putting through the washing machine. I am open to alternative options.

  7. 0
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    Two points to make:
    1. Dutton is as gutless as a cooked trout.
    2. Since when has there been restrictions on purchasing goods? What laws have been broken?
    I certainly think it is un Australian and selfish to hoard in times of crisis but this discussion wouldn’t have come up if a sensible rationing program had been instigated at the beginning of March!

    • 0
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      This latest Australian ( ? ) government action reminds me of past times and similar crisis in another country, when the communist government tried to suppress peoples conspiring and criticism. They created a problem to get peoples desperate reaction and requests for solutions. It is the government’s punishment of us objecting to ban on cash, mandatory vaccines and the awareness to the establishment of their New Word Order, which in accordance with their agenda 2021 will take place next year. We have only one year left of the rest of freedom that is being taken away from us. Mark my words.

    • 0
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      I agree none of this makes any sense at all to me.

    • 0
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      Dutton is big noting himself there is nothing they can do about people hoarding it is not a crime unless they change the law and this mob are slowly taking away peoples rights and freedom of speech

    • 0
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      If hoarding to the extent that it puts people at risk is a right maybe it is a freedom that we can do without.
      No rights without responsibilities I say.

  8. 0
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    I would like to see the government members personal bank accounts, garages and cellars and how much money and stuff are they hoarding there ……

    • 0
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      COVID-19 is Much Less Deadly than the Common Flu

      https://healthimpactnews.com/2020/dr-brownstein-covid-19-is-much-less-deadly-than-the-common-flu/

      Flu shots – TARGETING THE ELDERLY to save on paying pensions.

    • 0
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      No it is just a mild flu with over 80% with mild or no symptoms. I have no fear of it at all.

    • 0
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      I am going for my over 65 flu shot today. We have to turn into pincushions thanks to globalization.

    • 0
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      I have fear of people who take this Pandemic lightly. The attitude of it’s a mild flu and I will be OK is selfish in the extreme, it is highly contagious, you might be fine. Your friends, family and others you pass it onto may die. Look at Italy, Iran and China

    • 0
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      HKW, Retiring Well and The Thinker, all I can say is that you are all idiots, and completely wrong.

    • 0
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      @ Sceptic, 23rd Mar 2020, 12:52pm

      You are either a paid troll and a brainwashed zombie …

    • 0
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      Because of whats happening in Italy, Spain and other countries i think that we all should be concerned. But lets not forged the normal flu kills over 400,000 world wide every year. And i agree i would like to see these politicians swiss bank accounts anyone that says that these guys dont get hand outs from billionairs are kidding themselves

    • 0
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      Sceptic well time will tell but I know who I’m backing. The flu itself is far more dangerous especially for the elderly etc.

      Did you know measles was 18 times more contagious than Covid-19? No I have never had a measles vaccine but we used to have parties so we could all get the measles when I was a kid.

    • 0
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      All the would be armchair medico’s astound me. All the information I have gathered
      from expert medics are saying that CV 19 is ten times stronger than the flu. Frankly
      I am more inclined to listen to someone who has studied and practiced medicine for thirty years than some gung ho armchair analyst who believes they are immortal and know more than the experts. Good luck with that line of thought.

    • 0
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      I cannot believe what I am reading here, every day the PM and health authorities are telling us how contagious this desease is, especially to older people and how much deadlier it is then the annual flu, I hope those who think it is nothing to be worried about are sticking to the social distancing laws now and staying home as much as they can. I am also fed up with people coming from the cities and coast to our small towns, in buses, and cleaning the shelves out, and as for what Peter Dutton said over a week ago , well nothing has changed has it, the toilet paper, rice, pasta and vegetable shelves in our Coles and Woolwoth’s stores are continually empty because of these people coming from away.

  9. 0
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    When is this utter madness going to end?

    It’s a mild flu for goodness sake. Over 80% of us will get it with no or mild symptoms and many wont even know they have it. I have no fear at all of contracting this mild flu.

    • 0
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      It is going to get worse before it gets better, if …… it’ll ever get better .
      They have something more sinister up their sleeves for us .

    • 0
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      Yes I am waiting for it too.

      Heard yesterday that the had called off the toilet paper hoarding but haven’t found out what they are up to next yet.

    • 0
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      Retiring Well, if you are young, and have no underlying health conditions (such as diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular issues, kidney disease, lung or respiratory tract conditions, imunodepressive disorders, asthma, and so on), then you are quite right with over 80% of those diagnosed having mild symptoms. You can also add that in Australia just 0.7% of those tested returned a positive result and more than 80% of those brought is to Australia either by visiting or returning home or being in close contact with someone who had.

      However, even young people with any or these (or other health conditions) the COVID-19 illness is more than a flu or a cold. And don’t forget that should you catch it, you can easily transmit it to someone else who does have underlying health conditions, with potemntiallt disterous outcomes.

      The reason China and Italy were/are so badly hit is because of the huge numbers of older, male smokers (China) and a higher proportion of older people (Italy).

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      Yes it is a mild flu so none of what is happening makes any sense to people like me. If you have all those diseases they have more chance of killing you than Covid-19 but the problem is that the stats are being updated if anyone dies with a positive COvid-19 result as a Covid-19 death. That’s right people die with Covid-19 not of Covid-19. Why this is being done has been concerned about what is the real agenda here? I no longer believe the media etc and I am truly sick of seeing the same video over and over again of people on respirators. Will Covid-19 kill me? I have no idea but I also know that something else has a far better chance of getting me first.

      My only concern is the mental illness will kill a lot more than Covid-19. So chill out and don’t take this so seriously.

    • 0
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      Retiring well, I hope that you are isolating. I am aware that there are people that love to spread contagious diseases too.

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      O don’t want to spread it but want to get it now if I have to get it at all.

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      We hear of deaths from the virus with underlying conditions but I wonder if the victims are on medication and that is reacting against the virus. Blood thinners, blockers and diuretics for hbp. Chemo, statins, half a dozen pills every day to combat kidney disease, liver disease, cancer and the list goes on. Some of those maybe act as an immune suppressant leaving people at risk.

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      Nor do I, RW – and I’m 70 with cardiac issues.

  10. 0
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    OK Horace Cope, so that use of the the word enterd the English language as the result of Amercans pronouncing the “m” indistinctly. Ignorant journalists took it up and it’s been used ever since. You look at and listen to the Orange Monster leading the US at the moment and you want to be associated with the 1500-word vocabulary, if that, which he possesses, then go ahead, be your own guest.

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      “The Oxford English Dictionary, for example, has an entry that defines “to hone in” this way: “To head directly for something; to turn one’s attention intently towards something. Usu. with on.””

      Hard to admit you are wrong notrov? Your proof that I look at and listen to the Orange Monster leading the US at the moment? Small word “sorry” but very hard to say.

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