For better or worse, COVID-19 could forever change the way you pay

The uptake of contactless payments could lead to the death of cash.

COVID-19 a cash killer?

Nearly half of all purchases made in person are now done contactless, according to new data, with shoppers and sellers afraid of germs on cash during the coronavirus pandemic.

Credit card company Mastercard has reported a 44 per cent decrease in the use of cash when making purchases in person since the COVID-19 outbreak began.

More than half (52 per cent) of Aussies are concerned about the ‘dirtiness’ of cash as a result of COVID-19. One in five (21 per cent) said the risk of infection transmission has led to their total elimination of cash usage.

Eight in 10 (79 per cent) of Australians say contactless payments are a cleaner way to pay.

Almost nine in 10 (88 per cent) of contactless payments involved debit or credit cards and around a quarter use their mobile phone to pay.

The pandemic has led to a huge behavioural shift in payment methods, with 94 per cent of Aussies having made contactless purchases at the grocery store, 70 per cent doing so at a pharmacy and 56 per cent at any other retailer.

“Consumer behaviour around payments has seen a shift since COVID-19, which has transformed the daily lives of Australians," said Mastercard division president Australasia Richard Wormald.

"Australians are looking for a safe, clean and secure way to pay, which has seen contactless card and device transactions surge.

"It is clear that this is the preferred way to pay, now, and for the future."

Almost eight in 10 (79 per cent) people worldwide and more than nine in 10 (91 per cent) in the Asia Pacific are now using tap-and-go payments for regular purchases. Globally, almost half (46 per cent) say contactless payments will now be a permanent fixture for them.

“The fact that three in four people intend to keep using tap-and-go after the pandemic is a strong sign that consumers see the long-term benefits of having a safer, cleaner way to pay, checking out faster and being more socially responsible," said Mastercard executive vice-president, products and innovation, Asia Pacific, Sandeep Malhotra.

The World Health Organisation (WHO) recommends the use of bank cards over cash to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Cashless payment is also encouraged by supermarket giants Aldi, Woolworths and Coles on their websites.

According to a CHOICE report, microbiology professor Peter White believes the virus could remain infectious on objects such as polymer banknotes for "anywhere between six and 24 hours depending on the temperature and humidity".

Going cashless may help reduce the spread of the virus, but some money experts are concerned the increased use of credit cards will lead to money mismanagement and greater debt.

“The Australian government official medical advice is to ‘tap to pay where possible instead of using cash’ - this advice will drive increased use in credit and store cards," said Financial Mindfulness chief Andrew Fleming.

"A lot of people have seen their incomes slashed, and they are being asked to reach for their cards to pay for goods and services.

"In January 2020, just before the crisis, there was $42.6 billion owing on credit cards with $28.4 billion accruing interest. This situation, with lower incomes and increased use of cards – is a perfect storm for millions of Australians to deepen the financial holes they were already in."

Australia’s increased use of digital payment methods could be the nail in the old-fashioned cash coffin, credit card expert Roland Bleyer told Nest Egg.

He claims there are a number of reasons why this could be the case, noting that in the past month alone, “there has been a definite shift in the way we pay for things, with merchants moving away from cash – and the germs it may carry – declaring their preference for card payments instead” and that “as coronavirus continues to assert its influence over what we can and can’t do, Aussies are being encouraged to use contactless more than ever as a way to slow the spread”.

A number of stores already no longer accept cash. Tellers in stores that haven’t made the switch wear gloves to handle cash, or state that a contactless payment method is preferred.

“I think we will see more and more businesses refusing to accept cash. This is going to impact on certain areas of society, the aged sector and those less fortunate – more than others,” said Mr Bleyer.

He says there are more benefits to going cashless than reducing germ transmission, such as lowering the risk of petty theft at the cash register; more traceable business records for tax purposes, and that it’s simply a faster method of payment.

Mr Bleyer also busts the myth that a merchant must accept cash.

“[There is a] widespread belief that because official Australian coins and banknotes are legal tender, merchants must accept them as payment,” he said.

“However, the law sees it somewhat differently. According to the Currency Act, merchants have certain rights when it comes to accepting payments,” he said, adding that a merchant already has the right to limit the dollar amount in coins a customer may use to make a purchase.

He acknowledged that older Australians may have a hard time dealing with the switch to contactless payments.

“For many Aussies, especially those of the older generation, cash is still king,” he said.

“They like having cash, they like using cash, and they don’t particularly like the idea of having to use anything but cash when cash is still ‘legal tender’.”

He expects the law will protect businesses that wish to make a permanent switch to contactless payments.

“According to the Reserve Bank of Australia, merchants are ‘at liberty to set the commercial terms upon which payment will take place’ before the purchase, and refusal to accept payment in legal tender banknotes and coins is not unlawful,” he said.

“So, as long as the merchant has a sign at the counter that lays out these terms, which is visible to customers before the point of purchase, it is within its rights not to accept cash.”

Will you manage once cash is dead?

If you enjoy our content, don’t keep it to yourself. Share our free eNews with your friends and encourage them to sign up.

RELATED ARTICLES





    COMMENTS

    To make a comment, please register or login
    panos
    1st May 2020
    3:36pm
    This was the whole point of the pandemic..... KILL CASH............. the Govts and banks love it....

    Just imagine, drug dealers & other nefarious persons will now have to accept card only.... Govt and banks hand in hand to pry into your life and people are worried about the covid 19 APP..

    Where are the civil liberty people now crying out load about cash dis- appearing
    Joyful56
    1st May 2020
    4:35pm
    Spot on.
    Joyful56
    1st May 2020
    4:35pm
    Spot on.
    Greg
    1st May 2020
    5:13pm
    Year, that was the idea of the virus.....go back to your cave.
    Mary
    2nd May 2020
    8:22am
    You're right panos
    Ted Wards
    1st May 2020
    3:38pm
    I haven't used cash for years, don't know what the fuss is about.
    Oldman Roo
    1st May 2020
    4:19pm
    As they say , it is a matter of horses for courses . It all depends what size purchases one makes . The wife and I are Pensioners - our purchases are mainly small amounts and we like to know just what we have left in our purse at the end of the day or week . We are frightened paying by Credit card and becoming victims of all the scammers out there that are increasing in numbers and almost never found by the law .
    As we are also obviously , just about in the true sense of the word , counting every cent we spend , we have always found one can bargain on a price with Cash and help with the tight budget .
    I think there is more good reason in banning cards altogether than banning Cash .From day one of their introduction , I knew it would lead to a lot of people spending money they do not really have .It may have even be a way to boost the economy because it was made too attractive to spend big and end up in misery .
    Joyful56
    1st May 2020
    4:36pm
    Good for you - but not everyone feels the same and it should be a choice - not foisted upon us.
    Joyful56
    1st May 2020
    4:36pm
    Good for you - but not everyone feels the same and it should be a choice - not foisted upon us.
    Mariner
    1st May 2020
    4:44pm
    Ted - how do you buy a paper or a beer in the pub? I know it's possible in some places but the publicans do not like it that much. Aldi charges for using tap cards as well, won't worry me but my mates take it as offence to charge so they insist on cash.
    Rae
    1st May 2020
    5:16pm
    I hate surcharges on using a card. Perhaps this will lead to surcharges being made illegal. It's just another tax added by the merchant or the bank.
    Greg
    1st May 2020
    5:18pm
    Mariner - I haven't touch cash for many months now, no need with cards. I don't waste money on newspapers (the net is one big newspaper), I don't go to the pub, I buy coffees with a card and Aldi DON'T charge when using your bank account linked card (not a credit card).

    I just use my credit card everywhere except Aldi where I use my Comm Bank Keycard, no fees, no interest and a record of every transaction is kept if needed.
    Mariner
    1st May 2020
    5:34pm
    Greg - noticed that at Aldi as well. Overriding the tap card but then you need to touch those 4 buttons anyway, about the same as touching cash. My notes are always clean anyway, been in Africa for 8 years. Shops there display "no cash accepted taken out of underwear". Was quite common at the time. Well I do not mind the 0.5% on the total. When you spend $100 you do not really worry about the 50c.
    Buggsie
    1st May 2020
    3:41pm
    It is illegal for any merchant, within some limits, to refuse to accept cash as payment for goods as cash remains legal tender in Australia. Limits include making large payments using multiple coins eg 5 cent pieces to pay a $20 bill. We will see cash around for a long time to come. Don't forget, many of those advocating cashless payments are in businesses that make money from cashless transactions eg credit card companies. Cash under the mattress will remain as the preferred saving method for some Aussies for many years yet!
    panos
    1st May 2020
    3:49pm
    We shall see, 5 years at the most so all you pensioners rorting by the large amounts cash under the mattress or tins in the backyard, better spend up big and get rid of it before it's worthless...

    or your made to deposit it or lose it!!!!!!!!!!!
    Mariner
    1st May 2020
    4:40pm
    panos - it should read "inside" the mattress not under! Most of the people saving dosh bought gold a long time ago (or US$). Pointless putting our currency under anything, it's constantly losing value. Most tradies are just too happy to take cash any day for day-to-day jobs. No paper work, straight into the pocket and a discount for the pensioner.
    older&wiser
    1st May 2020
    6:47pm
    Buggsie - not correct. A business CAN deny you using cash - it is NOT illegal. See the following page - https://banknotes.rba.gov.au/legal/legal-tender/

    States clearly - Australian banknotes and coins do not necessarily have to be used in transactions and refusal to accept payment in legal tender banknotes and coins is not unlawful.
    Maggie
    2nd May 2020
    12:43am
    Mariner, you are wrong. The accepted phrase is "under the mattress." Might be a good idea to Google check your idea before you correct someone else.
    Mariner
    2nd May 2020
    11:53am
    &Maggie - I know the phrase alright, no worries! But today people are putting their money inside the mattress because everyone looks UNDER the mattress first. I do know a lot of oldies, Maggie.
    Pass the Ductape
    3rd May 2020
    9:48am
    Good on those morons here who are reinforcing the idea that pensioners might be keeping some cash in or under the bed.

    No doubt it's best we keep this idea to the forefront in the minds of crims prone to breaking into homes of older people and forcing them to disclose the whereabouts of this 'mythical stash' they might be keeping.

    Again - total morons!
    jayzaa
    1st May 2020
    4:05pm
    It will make everything more expensive. My local newsagent/mild bar won't do EFTPOS under $10.. And takeaways don't like card as transactions are taxable, haha
    Incognito
    3rd May 2020
    4:06pm
    Is that allowed, because since we got new owners of our local newsagent they said the same thing, do they lose sales because of this?
    Fedup
    1st May 2020
    4:07pm
    I’ll continue to use cash. I like to be able to see how much I’m spending. With a card it’s easy to lose track, and then get a shock when you receive the bill. I only use my card for direct debits, petrol and anything costing over $100.
    Mootnell
    1st May 2020
    4:19pm
    pay by card is all well and good until there is no POWER to operate the darn machines. hows it all going to work after a bushfire or cyclone wipes out power lines? The belief that money is somehow dirty is hilarious. The only dirty thing about money is those that would limit your rights to use it. Has someone told the virus and bugs that they are not allowed on the card, the card machine, or indeed the receipt you are handed, or your phone, etc? Talk about a lazy generation gradually drip-fed to believe whatever the government wants to implement and control you. There are none so blind as those that cannot see.
    Maggie
    2nd May 2020
    12:48am
    Have you not noticed that when there is a power outage, cash doesn't work either because cashiers cannot either open the tills or are too stupid to do a bit of arithmetic.
    Mary
    2nd May 2020
    8:21am
    I agree, Mootnell
    Mariner
    2nd May 2020
    11:57am
    Spent a full day in Airlie Beach during a power cut, I had a great time with cash, plastic card holders saved their money that day. Funny the ship we were on had a cash machine on board but people thought it would be cheaper in town.
    Joyful56
    1st May 2020
    4:35pm
    Yes and the sheeples will happily comply - until the day comes again when the power goes down for protracted periods (thinking bushfires, floods etc) - the poor people who've been put on the Indue card scam have nothing and all those, like many of us, who prefer cash anyway, will be stranded without any money - NOPE - not for me. I will use cash whenever and wherever I can.
    Joyful56
    1st May 2020
    4:35pm
    Yes and the sheeples will happily comply - until the day comes again when the power goes down for protracted periods (thinking bushfires, floods etc) - the poor people who've been put on the Indue card scam have nothing and all those, like many of us, who prefer cash anyway, will be stranded without any money - NOPE - not for me. I will use cash whenever and wherever I can.
    Rae
    1st May 2020
    5:12pm
    It will be fine until the banks fail and take all our savings or start charging to hold the money and they will.
    Mariner
    1st May 2020
    5:38pm
    Happens where I come from, Rae. My sister lives in Zurich and their banks charge you 0.75% for holding your cash in their bank. Deposit boxes come cheaper but there are not many available any more.
    jan
    1st May 2020
    5:18pm
    Don't know how my daughter will cope as she is black listed from all credit cards etc.
    cat
    2nd May 2020
    9:27am
    I don't have a credit card, I have a debit card which just covers the money in my account, and doesn't give me credit
    Alan
    1st May 2020
    5:20pm
    The reason why Banks love it is the transaction fees that they receive whenever a person uses a card, especially a credit card. The Government loves it because it makes tracking the Black Economy easier and therefore more difficult for people to avoid paying tax.

    Ultimately it will be the consumer who pays for the "convenience" of not having to carry cash and this will add to living costs for a group of people already stressed in the current environment. There being no such thing as a free lunch.
    Priscilla
    1st May 2020
    5:41pm
    Sorry to disappoint but I have been using cash to purchase everything I need; at supermarkets, petrol outlets etc. It is stupid to kill cash as using cards means you have to pay fees, some costing $600 a year and some much more. How does that make sense? It means banks and providers of these cards get rich whilst we get less and less for our money. Wake up - cash is good and is a great bargaining tool. Convenience is very, very costly.
    older&wiser
    1st May 2020
    6:59pm
    Same here Priscilla - I do have a debit card, but mostly use cash. I have never had a problem even under current conditions. Not one retailer/supplier has even hinted at denying cash.
    johninmelb
    1st May 2020
    5:45pm
    So much confusion here. Many of you haven't got a clue about the difference between DEBIT cards and CREDIT cards. Realistically, no-one needs a credit card any more and you can manage your money far better with a debit card, 'cos you can't spend any more than you have in your bank account. You can't overdraw on a debit card. And it is easy to keep track of - keep your receipts and a simple notebook of your spending. I just use the ING app on my phone and can see all my spending in an instant. Everything is easy when you make an effort. Wilful ignorance is a disease every bit as nasty as Covid-19 and needs to be eradicated.
    SuziJ
    2nd May 2020
    8:28am
    I agree, johninmelb. I don't have a Credit card, and as far as I'm concerned, will never have one.

    I'd rather go without than having to go into debt and use other's money and be charged high interest for doing so.

    I will still use cash for food & general spending - that way I know how much I'm spending.

    I use a prepaid Visa debit card attached to my frequent flyer membership card (not Qantas) for my fuel and car expenses. I put funds onto it every fortnight so that it's there when I need it.
    BillW41
    1st May 2020
    6:35pm
    Paying for small amounts by card is stupid. Who wants amounts of a few cents on their savings or credit card accounts? What a nightmare keeping track of entries and balancing accounts - or doesn't anyone care any more whether their balance is out of control? I have always opposed the use of "contactless" systems as inherently dangerous and haven't changed my opinion. Have written to the ABA about the security dangers (and the financial loss to the banks by constantly reimbursing defrauded customers) several times to no avail. Visa and Mastercard organisations are behind the push, not thinking financially responsible people.
    Fedup
    1st May 2020
    7:52pm
    Exactly. I started using my debit card for purchases a few weeks ago, but all the little withdrawal amounts that remained ‘pending’ for multiple days were just a pain. I want to be able to look at my account and see the balance at a glance, not have to calculate it. So I’m back to using cash and will continue to do so.
    Rae
    3rd May 2020
    8:10am
    It could be the Central Banks behind this as cashless is the only way they can charge negative interest rates on deposits without risking runs on banks. If we have to use a bank card then we are trapped with no means of getting out of charges or bank bail ins if the economy gets worse. Control the money and you control the people.

    If you think they are to be trusted and all that new legislation was just for fun then I do hope you are right or otherwise out kids and grandkids are screwed.

    And yes the security is yet another issue. I use a credit card not connected to my main bank and have a direct debit to pay it off each month. I then use cash for daily purchases, Aldi etc. That way my own savings are not compromised.
    Fedup
    1st May 2020
    7:47pm
    How many times do you go to a retailer and their eftpos isn’t working? Those with cash are laughing.

    Any business that doesn’t want my cash (post COVID) doesn’t want my business.
    skinner
    1st May 2020
    9:39pm
    Cash is king & should remain so but If you wish to use a card, go ahead but nobody should ever be FORCED to do the same!
    skinner
    1st May 2020
    9:39pm
    Cash is king & should remain so but If you wish to use a card, go ahead but nobody should ever be FORCED to do the same!
    Teacher
    2nd May 2020
    3:51am
    If an aged person with arthritis in the fingers had a 'tap' debit card, how easy would that be for a thief to steal said card and wipe out their savings. Then, when they get home they would have no money and no idea of where it had all gone.
    Also, would your friends have an electronic pay machine if you or they wanted to borrow money? What about giving some birthday money in a card? Are you going to include an electronic pay machine in the birthday present package? Don't be silly!
    I certainly wouldn't want to pay interest on a $1 or $5 purchase by card.
    SuziJ
    2nd May 2020
    8:32am
    Teacher, then use a 'Debit' card, rather than a 'Credit' card.

    As for the birthday money, you can always purchase a 'pre-paid' card and put it into the birthday card.
    cat
    2nd May 2020
    9:37am
    I also have arthritis in my hands. My account in the bank is divided I have one account that I can't use a card on which my direct debits come out of. If I had savings I would have another account without a card for that. My money left from bills with which basically I b-pay the rent out of and use for shopping is my main account with a visa debit card attached. I do my banking online as when I moved many years ago my credit union didn't have a branch where I am. I check it most days and if I have any problems about my card, either can't find it or an amount in my account I cant account for I can immediately cancel it and get a new card. It takes a few days and is a nuisance but it makes for safety. So basically even if I lost my card there is rarely enough money for anyone to benefit from. The other accounts can't be touched except by me with a secure password. The bank also requires a secure sms for unknown transactions.
    Incognito
    3rd May 2020
    4:11pm
    Tap and go has a limit, was $100 and was raised to $200, once you know the card is stolen you have to contact the bank immediately to cancel the card and they reimburse you for anything that was taken out in the meantime.
    SuziJ
    2nd May 2020
    8:12am
    Cash will never be 'dead' for me. I won't be using any card payments for my food or general spending. It will ALWAYS be cash so that I can keep an eye on my spending. NO ONE is going to tell me how to spend my money.

    Contactless can see your budget for food & spending 'run away' from you if you don't keep a keen eye on it.

    I certainly don't want prospective lenders prying into my financial affairs and seeing how much I do and don't spend on food and general spending. I feel that invades my privacy, and I've never had nothing left at the end of the fortnight. The money I do have left gets 'put away' for times when I may need it.

    Mastercard in this article is talking about 'Credit' cards, not bank issued 'Debit' cards. There's a MASSIVE difference.
    cat
    2nd May 2020
    9:24am
    I have always used my card for everything, love tap and go, but since the social isolating I find friends have brought things they find in the shops that they know I need and I insist on paying for them. So guess what I need cash! So for transactions between friends cash is still necessary, or for paying the lawnmower man or basically anyone who gets something for you that you need to reimburse them for, so maybe cash isn't dead after all.
    Mariner
    2nd May 2020
    12:09pm
    Most handymen around here do not carry ATM receivers, do not accept cheques, so cash is needed for many things like clean-ups in the garden (had one last week). Have not come across anyone who did not accept cash so far. I have seen the Govt adverts indicating I should pay by tap card. Still pay my bills at the post office in cash or a push button debit card.
    johninmelb
    2nd May 2020
    6:00pm
    The Reserve Bank solved all those problems with the New Payments Platform which came into operation in February 2018.

    You can now pay people instantly just using a mobile number or email address if they have set up their account to accept those payments.

    If I owe money to my friends, have to make a payment or reimburse someone, I just transfer it via my phone from my ING account direct to them. They have the money in a couple of minutes.

    I rarely use cash for anything now. Have $20 in my wallet in case of emergency, but everything else is paid by debit card and credit card. Being on a pension, I manage my money to the cent with Reckon accounts software. I can tell you where every cent of my money goes, and all itemised so I know exactly how much I spend on every category. Shows me where I might need to look for economies.
    Chris B T
    2nd May 2020
    12:02pm
    How good are your Cards/phones when there is a Internet,ATM,EFTPOS "FART" with no cash do you use "IOU" or go without.Fuel stations be a Major Problem without cash backup.
    Happens at the most inconvenient of times and to frequently.
    At least cash is "Reliable" doesn't rely on Electricity or Internet Connections.
    {;-(0)
    Mariner
    2nd May 2020
    12:13pm
    Well said Chris B T, more so for people who live in places where not everything always works they way we would like it to ("Our ATM not working today, cash only") is a sign quite frequently encountered further away from the big smoke.
    ex PS
    5th May 2020
    10:59am
    A retailer has the right to refuse cash, just as we have the right to take our cash to another store. It all balances out in the long run.
    GOW
    2nd May 2020
    2:30pm
    RUBBISH! How many poorer countries in the world have Credit cards and still rely on cash from tourists....what a load of......

    3rd May 2020
    11:35am
    If you are worried about using your debit card or getting it stolen then set up 2 bank accounts. Have the bulk of your money in one and a debit card linked too the other one which has only what you wish to spend. Now you can't spend more yourself and the thief can only spend what is in your account. Don't forget to tell your bank to limit your account to what's in it or they will allow it to be overdrawn.
    David
    3rd May 2020
    2:54pm
    I hope that Covid-19 spells the end of cash.
    All those dodgy people dealing in cash are able to understate their income to the ATO and Centrelink. Billions are lost in government revenue each year. As a result, honest people have to pay more in tax and our schools, road, hospitals, welfare system etc are not as well funded as they should be.
    Incognito
    3rd May 2020
    4:13pm
    We all know who the "dodgy people" are David and they are not the small fry's, they are those big corporations avoiding tax.
    David
    3rd May 2020
    4:38pm
    Incognito, the ‘small fry’s’ that engage in tax evasion by not returning income from cash jobs or claiming excessive deductions justify their dodgy behaviour by wrongly assuming that the biggest dodgy behavour is by the big end of town or multi-nationals. The ‘small fry’s’ say “So why shouldn’t we do it if the big corporations do it?”
    The tax gap is the difference between what an entity or individual should pay and what they actually pay.
    The tax gaps for entities and individuals liable for tax in Australia in 2015/16 are :
    • $1.8 billion for large corporates
    • $8.7 billion for individuals not in business
    • $11.1 billion for small businesses
    Large companies have a tax gap of 6% ie 94% is collected. Of this, 91% is voluntary and 3% is the result of audit adjustments. This figure of 94% is the same as the best tax systems in the world. Small businesses and individual segments have bigger tax gaps.
    Incognito
    3rd May 2020
    4:53pm
    I was mainly referring to those corporations that have the means to put money into tax havens and other means of avoiding paying tax, but still surprised by the numbers you have presented.
    David
    3rd May 2020
    5:21pm
    It doesn’t surprise me that most people would be surprised to find that the tax gap for individuals and small businesses is many times more than that of large corporates. I think that’s because the media unfortunately only focuses on tax evasion of large corporates as the dollar value per tax evading corporate is much larger, which makes it a much bigger news story compared to the far greater in number of individuals and small businesses that are engaging in tax evasion at smaller dollar values per person/business.
    The source of my figures are from an article in the November 2019 edition of the magazine ‘In the Black’ by CPA Australia.
    Anonymous
    6th May 2020
    8:09am
    I agree David. I woukd also like to see an expiry date on cash too so it has to be changed at regular intervals.
    Incognito
    3rd May 2020
    4:16pm
    My 83 year old mum will not use tap and go, she insists she needs cash so she knows how much money she has left, she has not internet access so having to go to the ATM all the time to check her balance or phone up would be annoying for her. I guess it is okay for those who have a lot of money to spare but my mum lives fortnight to fortnight.
    As for me, I don't mind using tap and go, and I check my bank at least once a week, but how do I buy my local honey, where I pick up a jar of honey and leave the money (cash) for payment in a container?
    Incognito
    3rd May 2020
    5:41pm
    Will we eventually move to more digital like Bitcoin avoiding the banks all together?
    Circum
    3rd May 2020
    7:32pm
    Anyone who prefers to use cash is a mug if they switch to a card to theoretically not transfer bugs.All you will achieve is having the card fraternity twisting the data and saying you wish to move away from cash.Your good intentions will be a sign that you want to switch to the dark side and want to dispense with the freedom and flexibility of dealing with cash and,in many cases throw away budgetary assistance.Cash is king.
    Circum
    3rd May 2020
    7:32pm
    Anyone who prefers to use cash is a mug if they switch to a card to theoretically not transfer bugs.All you will achieve is having the card fraternity twisting the data and saying you wish to move away from cash.Your good intentions will be a sign that you want to switch to the dark side and want to dispense with the freedom and flexibility of dealing with cash and,in many cases throw away budgetary assistance.Cash is king.
    Incognito
    3rd May 2020
    7:43pm
    And when has it been proven that anyone has caught a virus by handling money?
    Circum
    3rd May 2020
    8:15pm
    Valid point Incognito.I await the next illogical conclusion that the drop in cash usuage resulted in flattening the curve.Maybe our economic recovery can be based on building more lunatic asylums.
    Circum
    3rd May 2020
    8:15pm
    Valid point Incognito.I await the next illogical conclusion that the drop in cash usuage resulted in flattening the curve.Maybe our economic recovery can be based on building more lunatic asylums.
    ex PS
    5th May 2020
    10:49am
    In every instance where I have offered cash and told the retailer that it is all I have, the cash has been accepted, I have never had any comments about the retailer not wanting to deal in cash.
    The preference for plastic is just another furphy pushed forward by people with an agenda. once plastic becomes the norm, so will the bank charges for using them increase, if not to the card holder it will be to the retailer and they will be passed on.
    A single piece of cash spends less time in a persons hands than a card and I seldom see a person scratching their bum or noses or holding cash in their mouths like I do with cards.
    I did have a rich uncle once who wouldn't blow his nose with anything less than a ten pound note. LOL
    BillF2
    5th May 2020
    11:57am
    Who benefits from removing cash from the economic system? Certainly not the customer. Conspiracy theories aside, the only people to benefit will be the government, the banks and the suppliers of the transaction equipment. Apart from removing convenience from purchases, it will mean that everyone will have to have a bank account of sorts to be able to obtain a card with which to make purchases. Hardly a simple arrangement for the elderly, especially when you consider the hoops you have to jump through to open an account. And as soon as you do that, you have someone else with their hand in your pocket demanding fees, charges, overdue payments, etc. These are some of the problems without mentioning tracking and checking by a myriad of agencies. It appears that the brave new world is intended to be without the simplicity of cash transactions.
    Anonymous
    6th May 2020
    8:03am
    Cash is a real pain to use now so I avoid it. Cards, phones and computers make spending and paying bills a breeze. I certainly don't want to go back to using cash.
    ex PS
    7th May 2020
    7:28am
    I guess that making spending a breeze is the main reason retailers like plastic. Not so good for.those who are prone to impulse buying, especially for those with credit rather than debit cards.
    Freedom of chouce is the issue here, use plastic if you want but don't impose that option on others who choose not to.
    Anonymous
    7th May 2020
    8:41am
    Love my credit cards and use them for everything now. Love the free flight every year and all the other bells and whistles. Just got $5 off an online Golden Arches order.


    Join YOURLifeChoices, it’s free

    • Receive our daily enewsletter
    • Enter competitions
    • Comment on articles

    You May Like