Supermarkets cutting promotions and product shortages loom

Supermarkets struggling to keep up with demand caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

Supermarket shortages looming

Supermarkets will cut promotions and fewer products will be seen on shelves as tighter restrictions force more manufacturers to close and a lockdown on more services looms.

According to a New Daily report, Woolworths is already limiting regular weekly specials and is struggling to keep up with demand caused by the coronavirus outbreak.

Coles has also announced it will not publish a printed catalogue, as it is reticent to disappoint those who might be hunting for an advertised promotion the store can’t facilitate.

While hot-ticket items such as toilet paper return to shelves, customers will already be seeing other favourite items and essentials disappearing.

The meat department is a prime example of an area thinning in options. While meat products prepared in-store should be plentiful, expect to see a dearth of pre-prepared meat and poultry.

“There’s plenty of cows, there’s plenty of chooks but not plenty of people who are skilled to break down an animal (to meet the consumer demand), and that’s why we’re seeing less of these products on the shelves,” Queensland University of Technology associate professor Gary Mortimer told The New Daily.

Cheese and chocolate supplies will also start to dwindle, as will any products made offshore, as supply chains will soon start to feel the effects of border shutdowns. Many fear that fresh produce prices will rise and non-perishables such as packaged chips and biscuits will thin out as any factories deemed non-essential are closed.

“We could soon see some items disappear because producers and distributors are closing doors,” said marketing researcher Dr Michael Callaghan.

Once non-perishables start to peter out, some people are expecting price gouging on fresh fruit and vegetables. But Dr Callaghan said this accusation would be a hard link to prove, as winter already puts a premium on such produce.

However, he said any hindrances to the supply and distribution chain would naturally lead to higher prices.

“If a farmer is also trying to keep their head above water, and prep for an uncertain future, they could very well be selling their products at a higher price,” said Dr Callaghan.

“That inflation is passed onto customers. It’s just business.”

“The longer this goes on, the less super supermarkets will be,” he said.

While it may seem that Woolworths has indeed been ‘super’ by leading the charge on supporting Australians through this crisis, Dr Callaghan says the supermarket chain may have ulterior motives for its perceived benevolence.

“Woolworths does have a fairly strong reason for maximising profits and minimising costs because they’ve got to pay back all the wage theft they took from employees,” said Dr Callaghan.

“That’s part of the reason consumers might have noticed Woolies leading the way in ‘corona-washing’: Announcing business decisions that paint the company as a hero, such as dedicated community shopping hours.”

“Coles hasn’t really come out and corona-washed their business at all,” he added.

“And for me, that’s the wisest thing to do.”

Are you shopping with Woolworths or Coles? Which products have you noticed are in limited supply?

If you enjoy our content, don’t keep it to yourself. Share our free eNews with your friends and encourage them to sign up.

RELATED ARTICLES





    COMMENTS

    To make a comment, please register or login
    Jen50
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:09am
    This article is likely to start panic buying all over again. I live on the border of Hawthorn & Malvern in Melbourne and the the local Coles had plenty of stock when I went to senior’s hour on 1st April. All the shelves were full except for toilet paper, flour and pasta which were there, but stocks were low. I was to buy things I hadn’t been able to get for 3 weeks.
    KSS
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:45am
    I agree Jen50. But then YLC just lives a negative Nancy story especially one designed to scare its older readership who are mainly on fixed incomes. The 'corona washing' here is YLCs determination to bash 'big business' and the current government whether deserved or not.
    No mention of the 000s jobs Woolworth have given to workers from other sectors who have lost theirs, or the increase of dedicated shopping time for those who need it, or the extra financial assistance to food charities, or the food boxes for vulnerable people. . It doesn't fit the angle.
    Wstaton
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:03pm
    Yes I agree this is likely to cause further panic buying and I am disappointment at YLC.

    I was in a Aldi and IGA in the country and found that Vegies that had gone up are now down. I bought half a cauli for $1.69 in IGA. In Aldi there was plenty of meat not overpriced the same in IGA. I noticed the Pasta shelves were now fully stocked and other product altho not full were returning to that state.

    The only shelves not returning to being stocked were poo paper, some antiseptic sprays and the like. antiseptic stuff I can understand as it is being used more and more than it would usually be. But Loo paper! how much more are people using than in the past. maybe I can understand people with kids now at home but even then if I had kids at home I would be monitoring their usage from half a roll per visit.

    I have not noticed excessive prices although some stuff may become short if it comes from overseas. A lot of it is crap anyway I certainly won't miss it as I tend to buy Australian as much as I can.

    What gets me is that there are Australian manufactures competing with imported products yet I continuously hear people say "we can't produce it here as they would be more expensive" Well for example we produce 70% of poo paper with 30% imported. How come they can compete?
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    3:43pm
    Wow Wstation, I live in the country, too, with a wide variety of very competitive grocery outlets. I paid $7.95 for a cauliflower (or $4.50 for a half). Broccoli was $7kg.

    This quote from the article "“If a farmer is also trying to keep their head above water, and prep for an uncertain future, they could very well be selling their products at a higher price,” said Dr Callaghan" is an absolute misnomer, because the big supermarkets dictate the price they will pay the farmer by entering into a one-way contract, not the farmer saying what their selling price is.

    Why do you think our dairy farmers have been so screwed by the big supermarkets? The supermarkets say the price they will pay, on the condition that the farmer supply a constant stream of product, at every stage of storage/warehouse. If the farmer can't meet that supply at any stage, they are deemed to have broken the contract.

    The big supermarkets have nothing on special. Please don't let COVID create a pity party for the 'poor' supermarkets - they are reeling in the profits because people aren't spending their money elsewhere at a boutique or massage place, for example.

    My hairdresser has shut shop for now. She wants to protect her parents (who live next door) and so she can close, because she owns her own salon and doesn't employ staff.
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    5:55pm
    Also, KSS, while I have no wish to criticise the government in this crisis, initially, the PM was hopeless and has finally stepped up now and I even congratulate the spending he's committed to (but only if it's actually delivered in a timely fashion).

    I was appalled when the PM (LNP) blamed the NSW Premier (LNP) for the cruise liner fiasco in Sydney. What the hell is Border Force for, if not for that?

    There's a lot of blaming the States for things that the Federal government should be stepping up on. The States have to cop any fallout regarding health, schools, public service. police, etc. It really is time to scrap State governments if this sort of buck-passing continues, where no authority is actually accountable or actually HAS authority.

    The biggest lack of action from the federal government has been the lack of making sure that front line health workers are supplied with protective gear, so that they can test Australians who should have a corona test. The situation now is, you can only get a test if you've been overseas in the last 14 days or you've been in contact with such a person, or someone who's been confirmed to have COVID-19. If you have any symptoms like sore throat, runny nose, sneezing, dry cough, fever and headaches, like me and my partner, it doesn't matter, unless you're seriously ill. In this case you must self-isolate which means you can't leave the house, like me and my partner.
    I've had symptoms for over 4 weeks now but was refused a test about 3 weeks ago, over the phone. Now my partner has symptoms too and this morning, we had a carpark test after answering some questions. But not a COVID test, because as the Dr explained, they don't have enough protective gear for staff or COVID tests for patients, unless we were seriously ill. So armed with only gloves and a mask, the Dr checked our lungs, a finger test for oxygen levels, digital forehead test for temperature & a look at the back of our throats.

    As long as front line health workers aren't supplied with enough protective gear and corona tests, so that they can test Australians with symptoms, I THINK OUR GOVERNMENT IS NOT DOING ENOUGH. Nor can we rely on the accuracy of the figures they're releasing, because there must be many people out there who have COVID but they're not being tested or counted in the stats.
    Mez
    15th Apr 2020
    12:21pm
    At least they had a supply in stock which is better than nothing!
    Mariner
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:12am
    In our area it is getting difficult getting frozen vegetables, fortunately the fresh stuff is still plentiful but prices certainly have gone up. Cheaper beef cuts have also become rare but eye filet steak at $59 per kilo is available. I suppose after another week people will buy that as well, albeit reluctantly. Looking for 'specials' is finished, you're lucky to find what you came in the shop for.
    KSS
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:46am
    Don't know where you are but in my local supermarket this morning eye fillet was $44 kg which is about the same as usual.
    Mariner
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:14am
    Aldi has it at the price but the quality is not as good as Coles, buying Aldi pork fillets at $19 a kg instead, nice and tender, no waste.
    AutumnOz
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:27am
    Most Coles and Woolworths stores are located in a shopping centre where there are butchers shops as well as pharmacies etc.
    The prices of goods in both supermarkets have risen in the past six weeks and, no doubt, will continue to rise in the next few weeks.
    I suggest you try your local convenience store as in my area in NSW as their prices are still the same as they were weeks ago
    rtrish
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:42am
    NO local convenience shops here, Canberra Centre. They all shut up shop when Coles moved in. There is an Aldi but I hate going there; I get in there, but they don’t have enough checkouts and I miss my bus.
    Mariner
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:47am
    Have not got any convenience stores here apart from the ones in petrol stations and they are certainly not cheaper than the supermarkets. Have an IGA store in the neighborhood but it is in the next post code and we should stay put at our age or so they say.
    rtrish
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:39am
    I usually shop Coles Online, have for many years. But they have suspended deliveries. They SAY they will open for categories “soon,” but no sign yet. Instead I have registered with Woolies as an aged person and am getting deliveries. It’s about time Coles stepped up to the plate and re-started deliveries, for people in the special categories. I’m a loyal customer but seriously annoyed about this.
    notelle
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:06pm
    rtrish - I agree with you 100%. Reading you post was like reading my own story, word for word. I'd just like to add that I am not only seriously annoyed about this : but I am also SERIOUSLY thinking about switching over to Woolies from now on. Coles has truly let us loyal customers down.
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    6:00pm
    Ditch them both and go to your local IGA and green grocer. They are still offering truthful 'specials'.
    tisme
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:40am
    food prices went up at the start of this whole thing. $7.00 for a cauliflower sheesh if we run out it is because of the negligence of the supermarkets. with or without the virus , there has to be a supply of food coming in and they dont stock the shelves any quicker than they used to
    KSS
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:53am
    Seriously!
    You need to get real. The Eastern seaboard is still largely in drought. Price rises were predicted for fresh food well before COVID-19 was involved. So cauliflowers are expensive for you, then eat something else.
    No one will starve but may have to have something different to our usual fare. We may even have to shop at a different time or on a different day. There is more than enough to go round.
    Blame and accusations help no one.
    Mootnell
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:14am
    We are in rural SA we would love to pay $7 for a cauliflower. (Fibbing)
    But here they are $9, broccoli $14 and iceberg lettuce $7 we have an extensive veggie garden but certain times of the year we need to supplement.
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:22am
    A very theoretical drought - a hole dug down one foot here to plant a post filled with water....
    KSS
    3rd Apr 2020
    3:36pm
    Tell that to the farmers Karen and see what reaction you get.
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    8:05pm
    There is a small difference between drought and waiting for a crop to grow - in this region the grass is as high as an elephant's eye for the graziers and dairy farmers. That is but one reason the drought is theoretical - waiting for a crop in non-drought is still a carry-over but is not strictly drought, and nor is needing replace lost breeding stock and herd rebuilding. Most of the coast has has enormous rain, and is thus no drought-stricken - only taking time to recover from the after-shocks.
    Karen
    4th Apr 2020
    12:15am
    Drought-afflicted v drought-affected. Still doesn't help when your cattle stocks are low or you've missed three wheat harvests.
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    6:13pm
    Some are still in drought.

    The irony is that in the NSW food bowl, water is being siphoned away for coal mines and fracking. Two thirds of Murray/Darling water is licenced to only 2 corporations, who on-sell it to family farmers and corporate farms. They are water traffickers. Most of it goes to cotton crops (you can't eat cotton) and water-hungry crops like almonds, which have only sprung up on this arid country because the moneyed-up corporations who own these farms have guaranteed water.

    Food production? That's for poor farmers!
    Horace Cope
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:57am
    The truth is out there if you care to look. The shortages are caused by selfish people who are panic buying and the major stores have enough stock in their distribution centres but there is a limit to what trucks can carry. There is also a shortage of suitable trucks and drivers. The supermarkets have stopped creating specials because of a shortage of stock and this is a short term measure.
    Bundabergian
    3rd Apr 2020
    10:57am
    I avoid Woollies since they were so rude to me when I applied for a menial job. I usually go to Aldi or Coles. Occasionally go into the smaller independents and IGA and find the odd bargain. That does not include fresh fruit and veggies whcih seem to have sky rocketed locally, so we watch out for roadside farmer stalls.

    But I agree with Jen50, I think that it is the mention of possible shortages that initiates those shortages.
    jayzaa
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:00am
    Yes KSS is correct. Prices for frwsh veges was touted months ago
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    6:25pm
    But we've had a drought for years. Why suggest price rises now? And if Coles doesn't have 'specials' any more (because they don't want to cause a stampede, they say), then why don't they just reduce the price a bit or stop hiking up all the other prices?

    PRICE HIKES are what make people think they have to hoard, because they think if prices continue to rise so fast, they may not be able to afford anything soon. So they stampede like frightened cattle.
    Darts44
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:11am
    All the comments are all wind, but no one suggested a plan to keep the production and distribution of the food should the problem of the coronavirus last a little longer.
    Triss
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:27am
    I remember when I was a kid every week our local farmer had a big cart drawn by a big cart horse with all his fresh vegetables on board. Used to drive up and down the street stopping every so often. Sigh...those were the days.
    Mariner
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:44am
    Triss - makes me wonder whether the farmer also insisted on a piece of plastic or was not too scared to take cash, LOL
    Rae
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:11pm
    Yes Triss and the milkman, the rabbit breeder and the baker delivering breads and bakery items. Indeed it was in the days when we were not scared of employing people to serve customers.

    It was unheard of to actually have to serve yourself for no pay.
    Triss
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:22pm
    Not only did he accept cash, Mariner, he also accepted bits of apple etc that kids gave him for his horse who, in return, left the odd donation on the road for gardeners.
    If anybody was a bit hard up one week he’d let them pay the next week. Try that at Coles or Woollies.
    Mariner
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:47pm
    Triss - that was the way in my home town in Switzerland. He also allowed you to pay at the end of the week when the old man got paid. Was me being sent out with a shovel to collect the donation for the veggie patch.
    Mez
    15th Apr 2020
    12:30pm
    Starting stocking your own shelves NOW B4 PRICE HIKES AS THEY CERTAINLY WILL AND HAVE BEGUN TO!
    Gett'n Older
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:13am
    Well done on sending people into a panic buying spree again. We produce 3 times the food we need to feed the nation so there will no shortage. Thought you were above the tabloid style journalism. Not sure a Dr of Marketing and Business ethics is really a total expert on the supply chain. Its also not like chocolate is a necessity.
    Wstaton
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:10pm
    Of course we do have plenty and as an example this is after exporting 65% of beef.
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:20pm
    .. sold out for thirty pieces of silverside.....
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:20am
    Surely by now the idiot hoarders are filled up, and the knock-on effect of forcing others into panic mode has begun to ease?

    What the hell is wrong with people? And all I can say is that the major supermarkets must have had a massive stockpile of toilet paper somewhere, rather than a steady continuous supply chain that brought in loads to meet anticipated requirements. that mean they panicked and ran all the stock out to the stores and then found themselves stuck for supplies?

    I find that very difficult to swallow, and I smell a rat here somewhere.

    Why are the same faces allowed to stock day after day, while we're at it, and sometimes time after time on the one day? I go down every 2-3 days for half a dozen items - and I'll say it again - the single 36 pack of toilet paper I got over three weeks ago is still going strong, and that's three females and one male plus a dog in house training (chees - that's not my dog!).

    I ask again - what is wrong with people?
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:29am
    Also - how am I affecting anything if I go throw a line in off the breakwater all on my little lonesome? Should I mumble something about 'bloody Greenies' and fish stocks and enforcing universal marine parks for fish holiday destinations? Treat your migrating flathead like any other immigrant!! Chees - this nonsense is out of control.
    Julian
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:39am
    We're supposed to be living in a 'tolerant' society and this extends to allowing people to take advantage of situations and exploit others.

    Calling out certain misbehaving groups in society labels you a bigot, racist or whatever woke buzz word is in. For example, those who ignore limits to hoard baby formula for resale overseas, essential personal hygiene items for a quick profit...etc.

    Say nothing, go with the flow and you're tolerant.

    As usual, it's the minority that ruins it for everyone.
    Pass the Ductape
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:53am
    You only have to sit for a while and watch the number of people walking into Woolies or Coles, who come out a few minutes later with an item of foodstuff in each hand to know that these are likely to be the ones who frequent the stores on a daily basis and empty the shelves, leaving nothing for others!

    On one occasion, I saw the same man and woman do this not half an hour between each trip!
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:23pm
    Yes - there is an Aldi, a Coles and a Woolies here all within walking distance - not hard to see the same people trekking from one to the other and then back again, over and over, and maybe as a team of two or more - meaning the same pair can do six shops and then go and do the rounds again... and again.... making eighteen shops in all.

    Crazy... from all sides. the only upside is that these fools are paying top dollar for the very toilet paper they are creating the shortage in.
    Hoohoo
    5th Apr 2020
    6:08pm
    Julian it's easy to avoid being a bigot - just call out the bad behaviour and acknowledge that the perpetrators are from all races and creeds. Easy.

    It's when you generalise about certain races and creeds, because you don't notice the people who look like yourself behaving badly, that you get in trouble. Just call out the bad behaviour and leave it at that, so you don't reveal your bias (we all have it - it's normal).
    Julian
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:24am
    This article was not fact checked regarding so cold 'corona washing'.

    In November 2019 Coles did an audit and found that they had underpaid 600 workers a total of 20 million dollars.

    Coles like Woolworths, also has community shopping hours for the elderly and underprivileged.... So to me, this article appears somewhat biased.
    Darts44
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:27am
    More wind and no plan. A storm is coming. Thanks Guys.
    Darts44
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:29am
    Have a look here:
    https://hotcopper.com.au/threads/plan-for-the-distribution-of-food.5313064/
    Pass the Ductape
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:36am
    Sad isn't it?! It seems those who ARE doing the right thing and NOT panic buying are making it so much easier for those that do - the lousy bastards!
    Mariner
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:51am
    The panic seems to have spread to the grog shops, 1 carton of beer, 2 casks of wine. Do not often use the car so when it was out we got 3 cases of beer and 4 casks of wine. It is not that there were empty shelves. Maybe it's the anti-alcohol mob exercising muscle. The products last a long time before expiry date.
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:25pm
    Two cartons is enough,thankee, barkeep! Be back tomorrow for me next top-up. Who drinks that much?
    Mariner
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:51pm
    Depending how many live in the place, Karen. Normally drink quite a bit out but is not possible now, so we drink at home, only 10 minutes to midday! Time for a glass, have to hurry.
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    8:08pm
    You mariners are all the same (snuckles) - forget about the sun over the yardarm... I'm the only drinker here so it's me and the odd visiting relative - they usually have to drive home so it's two for them...
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    9:37pm
    I understood the authorities are trying to limit bulk buys of alcohol because of domestic violence rates increasing, with people now trapped at home with their abuser.

    So much domestic violence is alcohol related.
    On the Ball
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:37am
    Its almost as if this article is designed to prop up the oportunistics rip-offs that supermarkets are currently engaged in....
    My local Coles has a sign up on the frozen veg fridge specifically mentioning a shortage of frozen chips (??). At my (almost) local IGA they are on special at 1/2 price! Plenty of stock.
    Why have masses of food factories closed? Shortage of labour?
    Why were tomatoes $12.99 a kilo last week but back down to $4.50 this week? Suddenly grown lots have we?
    Babanas: $6.99 last week, $4.99 this week (same Coles but 2.99 at Aldi). Strawbs similar.
    They were up to $6 a 250gm punnet. Went to Alsi this week, $2.99. But my local Coles had them on special at $2.70.
    Start the panic, put prices up so innocent folks "stock up". Then when market is saturated, cant move aging stock so they have to go on special.
    Pass the Ductape
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:04pm
    The whole system works on ploys like this.... I know of a bait and tackle shop that once needed space in their freezers for new bait stock, but had an excess of boxes of pilchards they needed to get rid of to make room!

    They advertised that a shortage of pilchards was about to hit so those who needed bait would be wise to get in early. You can guess what happened then... Sold out of plichards by the end of the day!
    KSS
    3rd Apr 2020
    3:41pm
    I paid $2 a punnet this morning at Coles! Woolworth were the same price.
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    9:47pm
    ALDI and Woolworths bananas are the worst on the market. Sure, they're cheap at ALDI but they're huge and tasteless.

    I am lucky our local IGA (& often Coles) stock locally grown cavendish bananas. They are small, have great texture and tasty! I'd pay twice the price for them over those others, but often they are just as cheap or cheaper. Apparently it has something to do with enzymes nurtured in the soil, deliberately cultivated to make the bananas tasty.
    Gra
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:41am
    When I first saw the headline I thought you meant how log can they keep up the profiteering. Before Corona virus hit we could buy a 20 pack of Quilton toilet paper for $10. Today I paid $7.50 for a pack of 8. Someone is getting rich at our expense.
    Mariner
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:55am
    How many rolls do they need for one dump? Yes, I know a house full of women needs more toilet paper than a couple of blokes. But storing hundreds of rolls beggars belief . . .
    Pass the Ductape
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:09pm
    When it come to money Gra - it works by the honour system.. When money's involved, there is no honour!

    Mariner - not sure where your comment fits in here!?
    Wstaton
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:21pm
    Funny how this happens. I bought a pack of 4 (don't know what brand as IGA were splitting big packs in lots of 4 and only allowing one item) at IGA a few days ago I paid $2 that equates to $10 for twenty.
    KSS
    3rd Apr 2020
    3:43pm
    I got toilet paper - Quilton 20 rolls for $10 at Coles. No change of price. However, there were no smaller packs so I had to buy 5 times the amount I would usually buy!
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    8:11pm
    Went out to buy some biscuits (dry ones) and some pies today... Woolies and Coles had no beef certified pies, and the better types they had were about $1.50 a packet more than normal... went to ALDI and got two packets for their same old cheaper price.

    For the unwary - 'meat' means anything - beef means beef... but The Colt From Old Regret doesn't taste too bad mixed with snake etc... bit of goat roadkill and the odd deer shot by a farmer...
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    9:58pm
    It's difficult to compare toilet paper. First there's double-length and then there's 1 ply, 2 ply and 3 ply.

    I haven't bought any since before the day before the stampede started, but I usually buy the 8 pack double-length roll from ALDI as soon as the previous pack has been opened. We haven't even opened it yet and we have two toilets used every day in our house. I don't hold back as in, I use what I use to get the job done, so my usage hasn't changed, yet...

    I was determined not to even look for toilet paper until after this madness, and I haven't looked yet. But now we're in isolation, so maybe I should've looked.

    Glad to hear the tomatoes and strawberries have come back down near normal.
    BERRYUPSET
    3rd Apr 2020
    11:59am
    Your role is to report he NEWS!
    But this sort of article brings more FEAR to an already stressed nation!
    I`VE BEEN ABLE TO ACCESS WOOLWORTHS special deliveries service..takes about a week to get delivery BUT customer service and availability of most items was good!
    www.woolworths.online special delivery complete form follow liks good luck!
    rainman
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:36pm
    This ^

    Woolworths has been a very good service where I live. The form was easy to fill out and about 5 days for delivery.
    rainman
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:36pm
    This ^

    Woolworths has been a very good service where I live. The form was easy to fill out and about 5 days for delivery.
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    10:02pm
    Crumbs! I'll be out of isolation before the groceries are delivered!
    Priscilla
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:19pm
    Possibly if less food is exported there should be no reason for shortages in Australia and no need for prices to rise as they have. Checked prices on broccoli and cauliflower, some big shops were charging $9.99 and $8.99 respectively, whilst the Spudshed was charging 3 for $2 for broccoli and 99 cents for cauliflower. This looks like price gouging to me as these items are grown in Australia and are plentiful. That is only some items!
    Triss
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:30pm
    Hells teeth, I paid $6.50 kilo for broccoli. Wish we had a Spudshed.
    Bundabergian
    3rd Apr 2020
    12:41pm
    While we are on the subject of supermarkets...Woolies yesterday had given away the clean-the-belt-between-each-second-person and were saying pack your own bag. Now that doesn't affect me and I don't really care, but why? Checkout person still handles the tin or pack as it is scanned, he just put it on the bag packing turntable for me to pack. Why not just put it direct in the bag clipped onto the turntable? I cant see the reasoning behind it. Anyone??
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    10:05pm
    They don't want the staff to touch YOUR bag. I think they'd pack it into their Woolies plastic bag and charge you for it. 15c per bag, I think. Never paid for one, so don't know.
    johnp
    3rd Apr 2020
    1:36pm
    Why are producers and distributors are closing doors ?? Surely they can practice social distancing; I know we do at work !! Plus they are making good money !!
    Up front lady
    3rd Apr 2020
    1:43pm
    How irresponsible to print this. It's people's reactions to these articles causing any shortages, not the virus. If people would just be able to buy a months worth of groceries then that would stop people going to the shops which is what we're supposed to do. Stay home and stop the spread of the virus and everyone will stay well.
    Chooks are still laying eggs, cows still milking, food production still going on and if workers in these areas are getting sick its our fault. Stay home and stop eating so much.
    turtle
    3rd Apr 2020
    2:07pm
    Spot on Up front lady
    Karen
    3rd Apr 2020
    8:13pm
    I'm waiting for winter when the rats and mice will get into their hoards and start eating up their rice and pasta and stuff... a lot of that food will be wasted...
    Mark
    3rd Apr 2020
    2:46pm
    Interesting. Running out of biscuits but still plenty of fresh fruit and veg. More cooking at home and less eating out and very little take away since this started. I’m going to be a lot more healthy because of this.
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    10:08pm
    Now THAT'S a silver lining! Good on you, Mark.
    Suddha
    3rd Apr 2020
    2:54pm
    I agree. These scare tactics do not help anyone. This could start the panic buying again. Woolworths are been employing over 10000 people out of work so lets give them credit where its due. I recently received a home delivery and they substituted some items because of shortage with similar items which was priced more but there was no extra charge to me. So lets be carefully what we publish especially at these vert trying times.
    Blinky
    3rd Apr 2020
    5:47pm
    I agree with Jen's comment. Articles like these can only result in more panic buying, and we don't need this.
    Woolies are helping, that is what matters.
    Let us all be positive and stay away from negativity and doomsday type of comments, please!
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    10:09pm
    YAY Blinky!
    BERRYUPSET
    4th Apr 2020
    1:14am
    I ran into a guy queueing up outside BUNNINGS..He said he was shopping for seeds/plants manure to grow his OWN food!(may be a doomsday prepper)or he knew something I didn`t!???????
    During the war in UK we had allotments and grew lots of our own stuff POTATOES ,CARROTS ,LEEKS,CABBAGES YOU NAME IT!Never ran short!
    Bundabergian
    4th Apr 2020
    11:55am
    Bunnings ran out of veggie seedlings round this way, so many are growing their own. I think due to the high prices in the shops.
    JoJozep
    4th Apr 2020
    11:20am
    I did a little observation about two month ago at our local Coles. At the trolley storage area, they had signs saying wipe your hands with the wet tissues provided. There were two dispensers on the wall, and guess what, both were empty. This went on for three weeks, the dispensers were never touched in that time.

    I went over to the "complaints" counter to ask what's happening with such a vital health issue as people who may have had the virus and touched the trolley handles could be passing it on to hundreds of customers. This young brash "kid" answered the desk and asked what I wanted. After explaining they were out of stock, all deliveries of hand wipes had ceased. I said I'd like to speak to the manager.

    To my horror this "kid" said "I am the manager and gave me an ugly look" . Then I said, you haven't actually told me why there are no deliveries and he said "I put in an order 4 weeks ago." I said have you followed up on this very important supply measure since? To which the idiot replied, "They are not the only supply items i have to deal with."

    Then he blamed the local council who had bylaws that restricted deliveries to certain hours and there were no more night time deliveries between certain hours. But i said to him, "I remember seeing large delivery trucks appearing two or three times daily in the past, but the past month I haven't seen any". "Well the delivery companies must have shut down" he replied.

    If this is the typical standard of supermarket managers, God help us. Surely this idiot (and I say this because he had no plan B) could have raised concerns about deliveries with higher management, and Coles should be big enough to have their own supply warehouses and delivery system (like Aldi does), but like all big business, these sort of risks can be passed on to supply contractors and save Coles the costs of hiring people, maintaining plant and equipment and doing what they are supposed to do, supply and display a product for easy sale.

    Three days later, the hand wipes were in place and both dispensers fully stocked. I guess my dressing down made the arsehole stop and think, instead of trying to please his masters all the time with puny cost cutting measures. I suppose to be fair, he was promoted to manager status because he convinced someone he was saving money, but he could give a rats about customer service.

    I go and shop at Coles because all the other counter staff are hard working and understanding, and show sympathy to older people and do their best to help.

    I only go occasionally to Wollies, I found their prices generally 1-10% higher than Coles for the same item. I also find their lighting of the store depressing, Coles have much better lighting and slightly wider aisles. All these features cost the store slightly more, I know because I refurbished many Coles supermarkets in the past and by being bright and cheery, made customers feel more comfortable.

    Brings to another small and important point. Coles always displays their pricing clearly under each item as they are required to do under the Act. Wollies I find, don't always display pricing at the product shelf, and when you ask someone, none of the few staff have a clue, so you have to take the item to a counter for a price check. Money saving measures again?
    BERRYUPSET
    4th Apr 2020
    2:14pm
    Thanks Jo,
    I could have died before I read ALL this!
    Have you thought of a BOOK?:-))))))))))))
    Pass the Ductape
    4th Apr 2020
    5:09pm
    Not very helpful Berryupset.

    JoJozep had a point to make and each one of us does it in his or her's own way. Coles would do well to take note of what they were attempting to convey.

    Your snide remark did nothing for the cause.
    Hoohoo
    4th Apr 2020
    10:21pm
    Good on you, Jojozep.

    To be fair to the young manager, he may have already copped a barrage of abuse earlier in the day, from unreasonable people whingeing about things that WERE totally out of his control. I make a point of asking checkout staff how they're coping and most say 'OK' but then say someone was abusive or unfriendly.

    Everyone is experiencing more stress right now so it's important not to spread unnecessary stress around, as much as it's important not to spread the virus. Sure, these are troubling times but it will be over some time soon, and why not get through it with grace and style rather than anger and fear?
    BERRYUPSET
    4th Apr 2020
    10:10pm
    To PASS THE DUCTAPE....re JOJOSEP My remark was meant to be humorous not SNIDE !
    Don`t take life too seriously..............You`ll never get out alive!!
    PARTICULARLY TODAY!
    (Apologies to JO meant in fun!
    JoJozep
    5th Apr 2020
    11:13am
    Thanks all!.

    I understand, and I'll try to keep my comments brief in future.
    BERRYUPSET
    5th Apr 2020
    11:57am
    Just be yourself Jo!
    ALL GOOD! Stay well and safe!
    best wishes
    Al
    Twyla
    5th Apr 2020
    7:25pm
    Food shortages are due to panic buying.

    It is ridiculous to believe that we in Australia would run short.

    For those who believe we will, the government would bring in rationing with ration books so none would go without.
    Baby Huey
    6th Apr 2020
    1:31pm
    To date I have not noticed any price gouging. No specials - everything at full price. That may change as the China virus lockdown continues. If the lockdown continues esculating shortages of essential items the government may have to issue ration cards as they did in WWII.
    Hoohoo
    6th Apr 2020
    7:18pm
    They should do it for toilet paper right now. I thought my usual supply would see me through, but now I don't know. It would stop hoarding in its tracks.
    Pass the Ductape
    7th Apr 2020
    3:40am
    Something has to be done - the situation at the moment is ridiculous!
    We've not been shopping for weeks as we waited for the idiot hoarders to calm down, but this hasn't happened and now all our normal reserves are almost depleted.

    Seems as though we'll be soon forced into the maddening fray ourselves!
    Hoohoo
    7th Apr 2020
    12:11pm
    Same here, Pass the Ductape, but now we're in isolation so we don't even have the choice to step into the maddening crowd. We have to ask someone else to do it and frankly, I'd rather take the risk myself than ask someone else to put themselves at risk.

    My greatest fear is that COVID is already spreading through the general population and the people most at risk are isolating, while the general population continues to spread it around. Not providing corona tests is contributing to this. They could nip it in the bud if they tested everyone with symptoms, but Australia is not equipped for that. What will happen when the isolated emerge? Will it only be safe to emerge if there's a vaccination available? Only time will tell.

    The idea of flattening the curve means fewer will die because the spike won't overwhelm ICU wards so people go untreated and die. But many will still die down the track, in ICU wards, even with respirators. They won't all be old people, either.
    Pass the Ductape
    7th Apr 2020
    4:42pm
    Hoohoo..Isolation? Is that total isolation where you aren't allowed to go out?

    That must mean you've come into contact with someone whose had symptoms - or you have it yourself, doesn't it? Otherwise your still good to go and shop! Feel for you Hoohoo. And you're right - those of us who are doing their best to stay at home and dodge this thing (only going out when it's absolutely necessary) are still being placed at risk by the thoughtless morons who can't seem to get it!

    We live too far distant to have someone else do the shop for us so we had no choice....what an experience. After all the hype about keeping your distance, most were not taking it too seriously.

    The only conclusion you could draw was that they must have either been deaf, stupid, or illiterate! Probably all three.
    Hoohoo
    9th Apr 2020
    5:04pm
    Yes, PtD, total isolation. We haven't been out since last Saturday, when instructed to isolate by the Doctor.

    Unlike people who've been overseas in the last 14 days or anyone who's been in contact with them or a known COVID case, we were told to wait until symptoms have ceased and then wait another 2 days (48 hours) before going out. Ours is called self-isolation, whereas others from overseas etc. are policed and fined. Who knows, maybe we are being watched, too? The police have access to track your mobile phone but maybe they park in your street if they suspect you?

    Not risking it, anyway, so I'm not worried about THAT but can't say I'm happy about the lack of privacy all citizens suffer as a result of our Government collecting everyone's metadata. It only needs one personal enemy to lie and alert officials to watch and listen to you. Cover the video on your laptop and never use Siri - she listens ALL THE TIME and reports information back into the search engines, who, as we know, have no morals or scruples.
    KB
    7th Apr 2020
    3:21pm
    We shop at Coles. My daughter does the essential shopping. Toilet paper tissues chocolate and other junk food are in high demand. Otherwise I get some of my shopping done through a company. People are also
    stocking up food other reasons such as having families home all day long Coles now have further restrctions on cleaning product. Hard to access
    KB
    7th Apr 2020
    3:21pm
    We shop at Coles. My daughter does the essential shopping. Toilet paper tissues chocolate and other junk food are in high demand. Otherwise I get some of my shopping done through a company. People are also
    stocking up food other reasons such as having families home all day long Coles now have further restrctions on cleaning product. Hard to access
    Roy R
    9th Apr 2020
    7:56pm
    Both Coles and Woolworths are manipulating things to suit themselves. This is a good opportunity to get rid of Brand names so the home brands can prevail.
    I have noticed that various products that are not available in one chain ARE available in the other chains store in the same location. Go figure.
    Mez
    15th Apr 2020
    12:45pm
    Go to Aldi for cheaper products!
    Even IGA has improved as well since the past when I was too much of a snob to sh op there but since a few years ago, I go to Aldi, and now there's an IGA next to it so I check them out as well for lower prices before going to Coles for anything they have that the other 2 didn't.
    Meat and fish I usually buy fresh at the smaller shops because I am informed that supermarkets have Hal Certified meats, dairy, confectionery and breads as I do not like to be forced into funding Islamic colleges and MOSQUES to be constructed here and overseas such as in Malaysia according to a Four Corners program a few years ago.
    Pass the Ductape
    16th Apr 2020
    8:42am
    Anyone who shops at Aldi would have to be blind not to notice that they also, are nowhere near as cheap as they used to be.

    It's the old ploy all retailers do in this country - suck them in then jack up the prices - and we let them do it with a smile on our faces.
    JoJozep
    10th Apr 2020
    1:37pm
    The purchasing managers of two main stores, Coles and Woolies have put their thinking caps on. How would you explain that Coles had Kleenex toilet tissues for sale at two rolls for Ten dollars. Yes they were available (first time I saw toilet paper in five weeks) but why such a price?

    1. They are price gouging, but why? yes the price had the effect of reducing demand as there were 100 or so rolls available, but what do pensioners do? If they buy one roll to save $5, how long will it last? The rolls produced today, by supposedly Australian companies reek of price gouging at the extreme. This I hold our PM and his cohort responsible for in not watching Australian companies being honest about their products.

    1. They advertise tissue boxes at twice the price of competitors from overseas and contain half the number of tissues per box, thus charging about 4 times the price.

    2. With toilet rolls, they brag about one, two or three ply. They never mention tissue size. I would challenge anyone on earth to use one tissue per wipe and have a clean bottom. Besides, if the one ply is on special and twice the number of tissues and for a cheaper price, buy that roll. Why? Because you can always fold the paper over to make two or even three ply.

    3. Australia is one of the leading raw paper producers in the world. Why then can't we produce matching prices to overseas competitors. The industry is highly mechanized so labour is not an issue. It is called greed! Australian companies have a philosophy of "make hay while the sun shines", so the owners and top directors make their killing as soon as possible, and bugger the rest. If the company folds, who cares?

    Take another example. All products that are advertised frequently, always cost more. So for example, the usual price of John West products is twice that of overseas suppliers. And please tell me where does John West source its products, you guessed it, from the same ocean sources. Same theory applies to thousands of products produced in Australia. Take Paul's milk as another example. I was generously supplied by a close neighbour (doing the right thing) with 3 litres of plain full cream milk, Next time I shopped,I noticed Coles 3 litre was around $3.60 and Paul's milk around $6.60, nearly twice as much. To make matters worse, Paul's milk tasted funny, even though well within the use by date printed. I must have been brought up in a different era.

    To continue my beef, why, when I was a primary school child in the 50"S, we were all given a half pint of milk every morning? NO, not anymore.

    Please explain?
    Mez
    15th Apr 2020
    12:20pm
    Never liked Woolworths as it doesn't have a diverse range of choices in products in the European and Asian range.
    It appears to be more bland as with English style products and promotions and their loyalty points system did not appeal to me.
    However, I do find that they sometimes have something that others don't have like a particular brand of insect spray for bed bugs!
    Darts44
    22nd Apr 2020
    6:48am
    Yesterday, I came back from shopping for fresch vegies .
    1 onion, 2 bananas, 1/2 cauliflower, 1 Lebanese cucumber, 2 tomatoes.
    Time to take my multi vitamine to fend off the scurvy.
    I still feel very lucky to have food.
    Spare some thought for people in Africa and South America, where more people will die from
    starvation that the virus


    Join YOURLifeChoices, it’s free

    • Receive our daily enewsletter
    • Enter competitions
    • Comment on articles