Who'll be hit hardest by COVID-19 pandemic – and who'll pay for it

Spare a thought for those who’ll be hit hardest and those who’ll pay the bill, says ANU.

woman wearing a surgical mask stares out of her window

While you’re stuck inside lamenting your loss of freedom, spare a thought for those who’ll be hit hardest by the pandemic.

COVID-19 could be the catalyst for this generation’s Great Depression, says an Australian National University (ANU) health equality expert.

Professor Sharon Friel, Director of the Menzies Centre for Health Governance at ANU, believes the pandemic could have profound long-term health implications for the socially disadvantaged.

The coronavirus won’t discriminate when infecting people, but how Australia’s economic and social services systems respond is very socially patterned, says Prof Friel.

“Poor people, the precariously employed, those with big existing debts, the homeless, people with disabilities, the socially marginalised – these are the vulnerable people who will feel the disastrous effects of this global pandemic most,” she said.

“They will suffer for many, many years to come.”

Prof Friel is worried the equality gap will widen further as a result of the pandemic.

“COVID-19 will have significant impacts on health inequities in Australia through the economic and social fallout resulting from necessary pandemic mitigation measures compounding an already inequitable society,” wrote Prof Friel with the VicHealth CEO Dr Sandro Demaio in an article for the Medical Journal of Australia.

“The existing embedded inequities in the social determinants of health will amplify the COVID-19 response effects, exposing socially disadvantaged groups even more. Fourteen per cent of Australians already live in poverty, and income inequities have widened.”

While Prof Friel applauded the government’s increased JobSeeker payments in response to the coronavirus pandemic, she argued that the jobless should not lose this benefit afterwards.

“This extra cash in the pockets of the unemployed should be a mainstay of public policy, not just a temporary fix for the dire economic situation the country finds itself in,” she said.

Professor Friel and Dr Demaio also say the health sector has a vital role to play now and in future.

“An analysis of 266 health policies showed that while the rhetoric of the social determinants of health abounds in governments’ health policies, medical care and individualised behavioural change strategies continue to be privileged during implementation,” they wrote.

“These policies matter, of course, but they will not prevent massive health inequities. The health sector must engage in policy discussions about welfare, labour markets, housing and infrastructure, to name a few.

“COVID-19 may end up being this generation’s Great Depression. The determinants of health, and how they are distributed, should be our guiding measure of a successful Australia as we rebuild from COVID-19.”

While the poor and disadvantaged may be hardest hit by the pandemic, another ANU professor says it will be young people who’ll foot the bill for the government’s economic response to the COVID-19 crisis.

Leading economist Professor Robert Breunig, who heads up the ANU’s Tax and Transfer Policy Institute believes Australia’s tax system will mean young people bear rthe economic burden for the pandemic stimulus packages, adding that this crisis may end up increasing inter-generational inequality.

“This inequality will be exacerbated by our tax system settings,” said Prof Breunig.

“The massive government spend of at least $330 billion to counter the economic shock of COVID-19 will have to be paid for by young people. The design of Australia’ tax system has pre-determined this outcome.

“Our heavy reliance on direct taxation—activities by corporations or individuals—means that the tax burden to repay the debt will fall very heavily on the future incomes of young people, which will now be lower as a consequence of the pandemic.

“In addition, governments’ economic responses to crises like COVID-19 favour protecting people’s assets and their value. This includes the family home and shares.

“This is fine for people with assets. But in the main young people don’t have these assets and if their parents don’t have these assets, they can’t even look forward to inheriting them. And so they are the ones who will be left with the bill.”

Prof Breunig is calling for urgent policy fixes and has proposed a number of solutions to make the tax system fairer, one of which would be increasing GST.

“This has the extra benefit of taxing people’s accumulated wealth as they spend it,” he said.

“We should also switch from stamp duty to land tax to better capture the value of increased asset prices and make it easier for people to buy and sell houses.

“Another option is to include owner-occupied housing in the asset test for the age pension and introduce a government-run reverse-mortgage program to help people to spend their assets while alive.

“And we should reduce corporate and personal rates while removing many of the exemptions that allow people to avoid paying their fair share of tax.”

These policies, when implemented with others, should stimulate more economic growth and reduce house prices in Australia.

“Both of these are good things for young people,” he said.

“By tapping into accumulated wealth, these policies will also help to redistribute the financial burden of this pandemic across society more equally – this benefits everyone and especially young people.”

Are you worried the pandemic will lead to a depression? Are you in the group that will be hit hardest by this crisis? What do you think of Prof Breunig’s ideas for paying the bill for the government’s response to COVID-19?

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    COMMENTS

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    Horace Cope
    17th Apr 2020
    9:47am
    "Are you worried the pandemic will lead to a depression? Are you in the group that will be hit hardest by this crisis? What do you think of Prof Breunig’s ideas for paying the bill for the government’s response to COVID-19?"

    No, I have faith in the financial advisers to the government who have been working on the fiscal side of the COVID-19 pandemic as well as the medical experts working on the infectious side. It won't be easy and there will be some pain but I believe we will come out of this pandemic healthy and bruised but not beaten. We don't appear to be in the group hit hardest by this pandemic but we may have to do some belt tightening.

    Because we live in a free market democratic society, there will be those who are well off and on the other end of the spectrum there will be those who will be doing it tough. Reading what the good Professor has proposed smacks to me of socialism or, to use another term, communism. The way I read his theory is that people who have accumulated wealth are to lose a good proportion of their wealth to give it to those who don't have a lot and I can't support that theory at all.
    Brissiegirl
    17th Apr 2020
    10:29am
    Couldn't agree more. The socialist push comes surging through with every academic opinion on Your Life Choices. If this site made a submission to government on any issue affecting older people, it would likely be socialist-biased.

    I feel utterly gutted about what's happening to our young people. For many years I've been unable to weep away various sadnesses, but this time the flood gates regularly open. It's heartbreaking for every age category, but particularly our young. No-one escapes. The upside may be that with the predictable decline in real estate values, our young people will get a better chance in the home-ownership market.

    This is the best opportunity to ditch our culturally cringeworthy belief that we have to give huge sums to countries that have never improved their quality of life as a result of recurring massive financial gifts from western democracies. The virus is teaching us that our dependence on China has to cease forthwith. It's teaching us to be cleaner and to value our interaction with others.

    We do not help the poor by tearing down the rich who are the financial risk-takers, the business people who employ the majority of Australians, and they should be respected for their entrepreneurship and talents. The only people getting their real wage right now are public servants. Teachers have put themselves on extended fully paid holidays (who else gets a guaranteed total of 3 months per annum paid annual leave?) when thousands of others have gone broke. The education system has been permitted to evolve into a socialist breeding ground.
    john
    17th Apr 2020
    10:45am
    I agree, I don't agree with all the doom sayers.
    In fact, the knowledge that this is going to cost a lot is the very reason that all will have to change their way of thinking, the government will have no choice. I still wonder who all this money has to be paid back too, I have said if its international banking organisations, the money they lend must be from individuals and business' and industry depositing money for investments or for savings or doing all sorts of business.
    So to me, the planet may have to leave calling in debts in some instances behind, because the actual money lent to our governments through international banking organisations, was probably the publics money anyway, Plus taxes.

    Of course, banks do invest and make money for dividend-paying for all those who use banks all over the world.
    But basically those international money lenders and gigantically wealthy institutions,
    ALL STARTED WITH OTHER PEOPLES MONEY.

    Manipulation of the interest rate and the stock market, caused the great depression, manipulating and mistake making cause recessions, they won't let another one happen like that, because, the whole world as we hear incessantly and get told we're in this together!!!!
    Mariner
    17th Apr 2020
    11:29am
    Yes it will be mostly the younger generation paying off the debts of this pandemic like we oldies had to pay off the debts of WW2. Those today under 55 had a relative easier ride but them's the breaks. My parents' generation shouldered the mess from WW1. Maybe we just had it too good for a while?
    Eddy
    18th Apr 2020
    9:40pm
    Horace, someone will have to pay that's for sure and it won't be us oldies. While I can agree with most of your post equating socialism with communism is totalling misleading and meant to capitalise on peoples prejudices. To be more accurate I suggest you substitute "smacks to me of socialism or, to use another term, communism" with "smacks to me of socialism or, to use another term, Christianity". Christianity is an almost forgotten religious cult, rarely practiced nowadays, where rich people are encouraged to look after the poor, almost the exact opposite of capitalism or free market economy.
    Snowflake
    17th Apr 2020
    10:07am
    I have been impacted by Covid-19. I have been diagnosed with Prostate cancer and have been informed that cancer surgery is now classed as elective becasue of the pandemic. Seems there are alternative treatments so hopefully that will work.
    Brissiegirl
    17th Apr 2020
    10:34am
    Hopefully talk about lifting some restrictions will enable elective surgery if that's required. Not all prostate cancer requires surgery - my uncle has it for 15+ years, without surgery. Alternatives are often best for many types of cancer these days.
    ozirules
    17th Apr 2020
    12:55pm
    good luck with the alternate treatment Snowflake. I am in remission with prostate cancer after radio and hormone therapy which are far less invasive than surgery and have less detrimental effect than you probably would get post surgery. keep positive as the alternative treatments have a good success rate.
    john
    17th Apr 2020
    1:36pm
    I wish you tons and tons of luck. But if its a slow-moving prostate cancer, I believe that there are other ways for it to be treated . Sometimes you have lots of time .

    But I am not a Doctor, I have had ongoing problems in that area, and have read a ton of stuff on it.

    But once again GOOD LUCK GIVE IT A GOOD KICKING! Stay well. And your op will come.
    Eddy
    18th Apr 2020
    9:56pm
    Snowflake there are many treatments for PC nowadays as an alternative to surgery, but it all depends on your Gleason Score and your own preferences. I presume you have had a long discussion with your Urologist or, even better, a Urology Nurse. I suggest you Google 'Prostrate Cancer Support Group' for a local PCSG to get some reassurance.
    LENYJAC
    17th Apr 2020
    10:10am
    SEND THE BILL TO BLOODY china.......................
    Leanne
    17th Apr 2020
    10:23am
    So once again it is proposed as a possibility to include our home in the assets test and then maybe a reverse mortgage. So after many years struggling paying off our debt and bringing up our family it will now count against us and our family. We had hoped to leave our home to our family so they could afford to buy their own homes. Seems to me that the tighter you live to pay off debt, have a roof over your head and provide for your family The harder it will be. Would they prefer we all live in subsidied public housing and just spend our money throughout life instead of trying to provide our own home.
    101
    17th Apr 2020
    11:44am
    yes I also worked hard, at one time working 2 jobs, struggled to pay off all debt, contributed to my super before it became compulsory, set up my nest egg with an accumulation of shares and purchased a rental. Now I can't get any support from the current taxpayers because I've been too thrifty and taxes are way too high. My heart bleeds for you.
    Argus
    17th Apr 2020
    10:27am
    Typical of what one would expect from another socialist/communist parasite living off university money. Double the handouts for the habitual long term dole bludgers and our so-called refugees who will never work a day in their lives, take money from those who have accumulated any wealth because they actually worked to better themselves and also screw over the pensioners by finding ways to further reduce any entitlements.
    Sen.Cit.90
    17th Apr 2020
    10:54am
    Well, well This a first for me on these columns. I agree with all the above comments.
    In particular; leave us, bloody pensioners, alone, At age 91, I worked very hard long hours often 7 days per week for every penny I have. Any money that I have saved is from diligently being careful shopping. Plus the fact at my age I must consider eventually moving into a care facility that will eat up most of my savings and the sale of my Unit from which I will lose 30% exit fee.
    Horace Cope
    17th Apr 2020
    11:10am
    I looked up Professor Sharon Friel's credentials and she is a very well educated person although something caught my eye. In January 2010 she was awarded an Australian Research Council Future Fellowship to investigate the interface between health equity, social determinants and climate change. I wonder if her hypothesis is based on selfishness based around getting more funding. One would hope that funding for climate change would take a back seat to free up more funds for getting Australians back into work and stimulating the economy.
    panos
    17th Apr 2020
    10:38am
    Well bloody well excuse me, I am so sick to death of the companies that rape and pillage our natural resources, gas, oil , Iron Ore, coal, gold and all the others and pay no roylaties or tax to the country. Yes our country..

    A legion of Accountants are employed to allow these to not pay tax & the govt allows this rort of the Australian People...

    We own these assets...... The arab countries dont let this happen so why should we.
    Mariner
    17th Apr 2020
    11:04am
    Arab countries have different systems overall. Try to get the dole or the pension in one of them. You might not like the politicians here, have a look at their rulers, Sheiks and Princes. We are only paying all these monies to overseas countries because we are called the free world. I have lived in places where no foreign aid was ever given but not much to the local population either.
    101
    17th Apr 2020
    11:50am
    The Australian mining industry paid $185 billion in federal company tax and state and territory royalties between 2005-06 and 2015-16, according to a report produced by Deloitte Access Economics, The Deloitte report said that if you add in royalties to company tax, miners paid an effective tax rate of 51 per cent
    panos
    17th Apr 2020
    2:11pm
    185 Billion is just like me giving you $2.00..... in the scheme of things chump change, and thats what we are getting for all our natural resources.
    panos
    17th Apr 2020
    2:12pm
    Try to get the dole or the pension in one of them.

    It appears you dont need too as everything is so damn cheap....
    101
    17th Apr 2020
    5:13pm
    If you are so clever Panos, why are you on welfare?
    jan
    17th Apr 2020
    10:49am
    If we didn't import everything from China and people in Australia were to make things there wouldn't be so many people unemployed. I was touring Australia and wanted to by a Australian gift, I could not find one gift made in Australia, they were all made in China. I didn't buy anything. It doesn't take a professor to tell us the poor will get poorer etc. Ive been finding depression all my life, covid 19 as made no difference, just hope we can learn by our mistakes. Governments doing ok as long as he puts the people first and not greed. Agree Briss send these comments to government or your local mp.
    Chris B T
    17th Apr 2020
    10:51am
    Homeless will be just that, nothing to take from them other than less space to occupy.
    Make room for more Homeless, the Poor that have very little to live off/pay rent.
    There is a Moratorium on Evictions, not a no rent free kick. This is going to be Very Challenging for some.
    Christmas has past and the "Christmas Cringe" credit card has to be paid. No way of paying as no income for now or future.
    The landscape has Change Dramatically.
    Buggsie
    17th Apr 2020
    10:52am
    I'm not too concerned. Resistance to change, inertia particularly among pollies and historical data all point to little or no change in the short to medium term. Look back to the GFC. What's changed? Has the stock market reformed itself? No. Have the bloated salary packages and bonuses paid to top executives changed? No. Has the self interest of all pollies of all political parties changed? No. Why would anyone think that our tax system will undergo radical reform just because a virus is causing financial havoc in our economy? Oh, please ...get real. What political party is going to offend any group when we are in a recession/depression? No Morrison, not Albanese, for sure. Their focus will be on winning the 2022 election and to do that they will need the greypower vote more than ever. Maybe reform the GST ... perhaps.
    Mariner
    17th Apr 2020
    11:17am
    Reform the GST, What a funny way of saying 'Increase the GST'? OK, I can see 15% on everything, no exemption for fresh food, like it is in the rest of the Globe, possibly even higher alcohol and tobacco levies. In my old place in Europe it's 2.5% for necessities and 8.5% for things you want. Some places in the EU go up to 23%. Do we want that? Do we have a say in it? It will be a decision handed down like "you will work till 67" from now on. No referendum
    4b2
    17th Apr 2020
    11:16am
    I'm not sure how this mob will try to recover after the pandemic is over. One thing for sure though is they will blame the pandemic for the recession not their lack of policies. A government cant keep reducing tax and keep giving welfare to the wealthy. While at the time point to the unemployed for not trying harder and maintaining new-start at the introductory level. The jobs were not there Australia's unemployment level was nearly at a record low thanks to Australia's record growth over the past 23 years (thanks to PK).
    One of the financial advisors put the recovery at increasing income tax by $2 a week and the debt would be repaid in two years.
    At the moment slow mo and his mob are trying to reduce workers rights at a very inappropriate time. Haven't seen or herd from the employment minister since hi gaff about centre link. Strange? Cant wait to read Malcolm's book about this sleazy right wing party of petty bigoted Christians.
    Mariner
    17th Apr 2020
    11:23am
    Turnbull's book, happy reading, ab2. Another left leaning billionaire with money on the Caymans. His book will be full of sour grapes because the nation did not want him and his Republican Movement is on the wane.
    Luchar
    17th Apr 2020
    2:48pm
    Just wondering, 4b2, whether you are going to pay full price for Malcolm's book, or wait a week or two and pick it up for a few dollars at the discount counter?
    Paddington
    17th Apr 2020
    3:53pm
    Mariner, Turnbull was not voted out. His own party turfed him in a very dishonourable manner. Republican? This is Australia. I think you are a little confused.
    Interest rate is so low that repayment will not be as bad as what people think.
    Also, the economy is not all about taxes.
    gerry
    17th Apr 2020
    11:51am
    I see 23 yr old baristas crying cs they cant pay the rent of their designer unit one week after c19,,shouldnt they have thought of that when they were surfing thru the bars >>>???nightly in their designer clothes??,,,,,and two car families cant pay their mortgage yet go on a cruise every year and did you hear that cruise bookings are up40% this year? Vat is the only way to go,spend and you get hit save and you can weather the storm as me an 83 yr old can do because I respect rainy days ...poor but laughing at all those suckers who have lived beyond their means,,,Australians earn more than twice as much as yanks,,,When tariffs were rampant I wouldnt buy a Holden cos the unions had stifled management ,and were adverising cars4 on the floor when My Simca had had 5 on the floor for 10 years
    older&wiser
    17th Apr 2020
    5:58pm
    Absolutely with you gerry! My brother lives on the Gold Coast. Next door house is on a canal, has outdoors pool, large B-B-Q area, pontoon with boat and skidoos. Is tenanted with 5 guys, each of them paying $130 a week rent. 3 work casually in the hospitality industry, 2 in the building industry.
    The 3 guys deliberately choose to work in night clubs and night bars, so they can surf during the day. But for the past 3 years, they have worked like mad over some months with one employer, save up, leave the job, head off to Bali for a few months, come back, and then start up with a new employer. Now they are complaining that because they've lost their job, and they haven't been with their current employer for more than 12 months, they are only eligible for the Jobseeker payment ($560 p/w), not the Jobkeeper ($750 p/w). The other 2 guys are eligible for Job keeper.
    BUT - now they are applying for rent relief. Really? Saying they can't afford the rent! Between the 5, they will be bringing in $2,950 A WEEK!! (and that's after tax). And rent is $650 a week. Because they are all the one household, and can have their girlfriends over, my brother says they now have more B-B-Q's, so there is always a legal crowd.
    No - should not be eligible for rent relief. This should not be available for people's life style choice.
    gerry
    17th Apr 2020
    12:00pm
    If we go socialist it will be all the under 50 s who will coppit in Australia living beyond their means,,,,,,,,You havnt been watching ,The Chinese quite justifily own the farms and businesses,all the childrens competitions and concert solos are won by Asians and all thru hard work
    Westerners move over the realmen have come to town
    I f you work hard and respect you will succeed in China
    Misty
    17th Apr 2020
    4:24pm
    My sister told me that most of the Private Hospitals in Woollongong have been bought by the Chinese, does anyone know if this is correct?.
    Triss
    17th Apr 2020
    5:27pm
    I’ve just looked up the number of private hospitals owned by Chinese, it’s staggering.
    gerry
    17th Apr 2020
    12:02pm
    My neybor lost his job one day but then tore off to Woolies and beat the Quantas people to a job
    neil
    17th Apr 2020
    1:13pm
    No, I don't think there will be a classic depression, but watch the 150,000 homeless in Australia swell. I expect Australia and Australians will just slip back to its and our somnambulant lives and ignore our fellow human beings.

    Neil.
    neil
    17th Apr 2020
    1:13pm
    No, I don't think there will be a classic depression, but watch the 150,000 homeless in Australia swell. I expect Australia and Australians will just slip back to its and our somnambulant lives and ignore our fellow human beings.

    Neil.
    Robyn
    17th Apr 2020
    1:30pm
    Spare a thought for those living in third world countries, many of whom face poverty, overcrowding and malnutrition. They are the most vulnerable to COVID-19. We live in the so-called Lucky Country and should appreciate all that the government is doing to assist us.
    panos
    17th Apr 2020
    2:08pm
    No
    mudGecko
    17th Apr 2020
    2:07pm
    Oh dear, another full-time Canberran, University academic, Professor Bruenig, a foreigner from California, whining that the younger generation might have to contribute, through taxes, to the nation--just the same as previous taxpayers have always done through good times and bad.

    Why is this glorified schoolteacher with his blatent socialist-communist steal-from-the-old nonsense given any publicity at all?

    By the way, there's no 'entitlement' to any inheritance.
    mudGecko
    17th Apr 2020
    2:07pm
    Oh dear, another full-time Canberran, University academic, Professor Bruenig, a foreigner from California, whining that the younger generation might have to contribute, through taxes, to the nation--just the same as previous taxpayers have always done through good times and bad.

    Why is this glorified schoolteacher with his blatent socialist-communist steal-from-the-old nonsense given any publicity at all?

    By the way, there's no 'entitlement' to any inheritance.
    Curious
    17th Apr 2020
    2:32pm
    I just can't believe what I have read in this article, who will be the hardest hit by this crisis and who will pay the cost of this stimulus package? Does the article suggest that the younger generation is to foot the bill in the later years?

    The Thirties Great Depression did not have the luxury of a government's stimulus rescue package, and experienced in banks closed, food rationed and the rate of unemployment skyrocketed. This phenomenon was followed by WWII in the Forties. The baby-boomers took these crises on their stride and riped the booms in the Fifties and Sixties.

    Yet, these baby-boomers were accused of selfishness in the recent generation war. Are we saying the younger generation is not as strong as the baby-boomers at their downturns? We should believe in them and invest in them.
    Maybe, the government's stimulus package has been designed with this purpose. Nevertheless, this package is a rescue stimulus, injecting bloodstream to our economy in readiness for a soft landing in recovery.

    Call it whatever you like, it is a recognition of the importance of small business and their workers, who make a contribution of 55.5% to the Nation's GDP in 2019 compared to 54.8% in 2018. The data reached an all-time high of 61.8 % in Mar 1983. Since globalization, private consumption has decreased by 5.3% to the GDP. This significant contribution to our economy cannot be over-emphasized. If the COVID-19 has any good to our humanity, it has shown us in this revelation.

    Workers and people matter. We need robust government policies to steel the course of our economy with sustainability and with a mission with a big emphasis on workers and people. Big companies will not sustain without small people to consume and contribute. This includes young and old people.
    Country John
    17th Apr 2020
    3:41pm
    When i was young we lived on 2nd hand furniture in a rental until we could afford better. We never dreamed of owning a home etc for well into 40's. Now they have new homes mainly and furniture and a car each. Teach them to wait. Why have they got money. Because the unions pushed for it. Now people complain about buying chinese. Its pretty obvious why. You pushed manufacturing overseas because it was too expensive here. We were warned. What happened? Unions pushed for more. Now your complaining about ig. WAKE UP. I am sick of the greed here. I am leaving for overseas as soon as I can fly. i can share the small amount i have in helping others. Why dont you complainers shut up and do somethinv with your wealth!!!!!
    DELboy
    17th Apr 2020
    5:18pm
    Well said CJ.
    Lethal Leigh
    17th Apr 2020
    3:47pm
    There is only one fair tax to increase and that is the GST. Note there is hardly any comment on this from any of the political parties.
    Misty
    17th Apr 2020
    4:28pm
    If every country effected by this virus has gone into debt why can't they write it off and start afresh/
    Triss
    17th Apr 2020
    5:30pm
    Not a bad idea, Misty.
    DELboy
    17th Apr 2020
    5:21pm
    Stop and think who is making a packet out of this virus, do you think they might help?
    Ancellotti1
    17th Apr 2020
    6:28pm
    I was just wondering where the Liberal party was able to borrow $200 Billion from to back the present bailout structure ? Anybody know
    Curious
    17th Apr 2020
    9:27pm
    IMF?
    TOR888
    17th Apr 2020
    9:32pm
    All these scumo supporters is sicking. Wake up you fools..this is again pure spin from a Hillsong Pedophile Protection Cult..
    KSS
    17th Apr 2020
    9:49pm
    You TOR888 are "sicking" with your disgusting unfounded accusations.
    Teacher
    18th Apr 2020
    2:26am
    Don't agree with increasing GST. That would hit the poor as well as the wealthy. Don't agree with land tax. That was disposed of many years back. Why now bring it back to affect pensioners living in their own, fully paid off and hard-earned home? Unfortunately trying to 'get at' the wealthy and take some off them would disadvantaging the poor which should not be done.
    Then again, the wealthiest people have accountants and lawyers who know all the tricks for avoiding tax so even upping the tax for people earning over so much might not be effective. Don't have an answer to this so we'll just have to wait and see.
    Spondonian
    18th Apr 2020
    8:47am
    What a crock of sh##t , my parents generation worked to pay off the WW1 debt then they had to endure the Great Depression without the help they get now days . After that they had to go fight another War WW2 and then spend their working lives paying the debt off for that . My generation continued to working to pay off that debt and to provide pensions for our previous generation , you did not hear us complaining about this . Now we have a sellfish , selfcentred generation encouraged by so called Academics to blame us and expect us to carry them through any adversities . GET OFF OUR BACKS , get a life and suck it up .
    Curious
    18th Apr 2020
    11:03am
    My exact sentiment.
    Justsane
    18th Apr 2020
    12:54pm
    How would increasing the GST make the tax system fairer? GST is a regressive tax. It taxes everybody the same, regardless of their income or wealth or poverty. If GST applied only to luxury items, this may have been the case but it applies to all goods except fresh food and all services.
    ex PS
    19th Apr 2020
    12:07pm
    The Self Funded Retirees will pay a good part of it. The guvment is once again looking with a gleam in there eyes at ghe huge amount of mo ey in our Super Funds.
    This crisis will trigger an attempt by them to get their greasy paws on our funds. We all know why this government has a reputation of having pasion fingers and what they do to everything they touch.

    21st Apr 2020
    10:44pm
    Bastards is being way to polite. I also was told by all my friends and family NOT to do this But I was a DUMB ASS and did it anyone. You know I am always right (NOT). They got 50k out of my pocket and when the account was over 115k.My account went down 111k in less than 30 minutes leaving $8,400. They knew this was my retirement money and didn’t give a damn. I guess they were done with me then because no one would take my calls.If it sounds to good to be true, it is. Luckily for me I was introduced to LukeReynold@protonmail.ch he helped me get all of my funds back.


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