Diabetes risk test

Take the test to discovering whether you are at an increased risk of developing diabetes.

Diabetes risk test

Discovering whether you are at an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes is as straightforward as taking the Diabetes Risk Test. By answering 10 simple questions, you can find out if you should book in for further assessment with your GP. Are you at risk?

You can take an interactive online test here, or simply answer the questions below and add up your score at the end.

Answer the following questions
Remember to keep a record of your score as you go.

Your age group

  • Under 35 years - 0 points
  • 35 - 44 years - 2 points
  • 45 - 54 years - 4 points
  • 55 - 64 years - 6 points
  • 65 years or over - 8 points

Your gender

  • Female - 0 points
  • Male - 3 points

Your ethnicity/country of birth:

Are you of Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, Pacific Islander or Maori descent?

  • No - 0 points
  • Yes - 2 points

Where were you born?

  • Australia - 0 points
  • Asia (including the Indian sub-continent), Middle East, North Africa, Southern Europe - 2 points
  • Other - 0 points

Have either of your parents, or any of your brothers or sisters been diagnosed with diabetes (type 1 or type 2)?

  • No - 0 points
  • Yes - 3 points

Have you ever been found to have high blood glucose (sugar) (for example, in a health examination, during an illness, during pregnancy)?

  • No - 0 points
  • Yes - 6 points

Are you currently taking medication for high blood pressure?

  • No - 0 points
  • Yes - 2 points

Do you currently smoke cigarettes or any other tobacco products on a daily basis?

  • No - 0 points
  • Yes - 2 points

How often do you eat vegetables or fruit?

  • Every day - 0 points
  • Not every day - 1 point

On average, would you say you do at least 2.5 hours of physical activity per week (for example, 30 minutes a day on five or more days a week)?

  • Yes - 0 points
  • No - 2 points

Your waist measurement taken below the ribs (usually at the level of the navel, and while standing)
The correct place to measure your waist is halfway between your lowest rib and the top of your hipbone, roughly in line with your navel. Measure directly against your skin, breathe out normally, make sure the tape is snug, without compressing the skin. Make a note of your waist measurement and score as below.

For those of Asian or Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent:

Men

  • Less than 90 cm - 0 points
  • 90 - 100 cm - 4 points
  • More than 100 cm - 7 points

Women

  • Less than 80 cm - 0 points
  • 80 - 90 cm - 4 points
  • More than 90 cm - 7 points

For all others (i.e. not of Asian or Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander descent:)

Men

  • Less than 102 cm - 0 points
  • 102 - 110 cm - 4 points
  • More than 110 cm - 7 points

Women

  • Less than 88 cm - 0 points
  • 88 - 100 cm - 4 points
  • More than 100 cm - 7 points

Your risk of developing type 2 diabetes within five years*
Check your total score against the three possible point ranges below.

Five or less: Low risk
If you scored five or less you are at low risk of developing type 2 diabetes within five years - approximately one person in every 100 will develop type 2 diabetes.

Six - 11: Intermediate risk
If you scored six to 11 you are at intermediate risk of developing type 2 diabetes within five years - for scores of six to 8, approximately one person in every 50 will develop diabetes. For scores of nine-11, approximately one person in every 30 will develop diabetes. Print this form and take it to your doctor. Discuss with the doctor your score and your individual risk. Improving your lifestyle may help reduce your risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

12 or more: High risk
If you scored 12 or more you are at high risk of developing type 2 diabetes within five years or you may have undiagnosed type 2 diabetes. For scores of 12-15, approximately one person in every 14 will develop diabetes. For scores of 16 to 19, approximately one person in every seven will develop diabetes. For scores of 20 and above, approximately one person in every three will develop diabetes. Print this form and take it to your doctor. Ask your doctor about having a fasting blood glucose test. Act now to prevent type 2 diabetes.

*The overall score may overestimate the risk of diabetes in those aged less than 25 years.





    COMMENTS

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    Young Simmo
    14th Jul 2014
    1:09pm
    I am starting to wonder about this so called Diabetes type 2 thing. I was told I have it about 8 or so years ago and have not changed anything in my life style. I still drink my 4 cans and a couple of reds each night. Still eat anything I feel like and that doesn't include many vegies etc. Still got the Peripheral Neuropathy in my feet, but all the Tablets, Creams and Medicines wont make any difference there. Anybody else think is an Overrated thing?
    Mike Omment
    14th Jul 2014
    2:17pm
    I blame tony abbot for diabetes
    Tim@toc
    14th Jul 2014
    5:50pm
    "If you think chronic illness may prevent you from enjoying the Grey Nomad lifestyle, then think again." What exactly is the relevance of the Diabetes article to your question about the Grey Nomad lifestyle?
    cookie47
    16th Jul 2014
    9:21am
    Just about to embark on a Grey Nomad trip around Australia at 67 ,I was confused (Like Tim) how the story relates to Grey Nomads in particular.
    Polly Esther
    17th Jul 2014
    11:41am
    I took the above test and submitted it. The results came back that I had dandruff. Go figure. No I didn't, that's bulldust, but this sure isn't, if I'm worried about my health I consult my doctor, not my hairdresser, let alone my computer.
    fish head
    17th Jul 2014
    5:10pm
    Young Simmo, diabetes of either type is a condition not to be taken lightly. I describe it to a silent killer. Diabetes does such internal damage and you don't even know it's there. It is through my father's side of the family so I have lived with diabetes all my life.My English sister-in-law ignored my warning and refused to make any adaptation to her life style. Now dead at 69. If you fancy existing with blindness, kidney failure, amputation or stroke go on your way.Apply a bit of will power and common sense and it can be fought.I think I prefer some quality of life even if I creak a bit.
    Young Simmo
    17th Jul 2014
    5:30pm
    fish head, I am sure your comment has some merit, but I consider my situation is slightly different to the average person.
    Firstly of all I am relatively fit and no memory problems as far as I can see, so at 74 I am probably luckier than a lot of other people.
    I take the Arthritis in my hands, thumbs, elbows as a normal part of ageing. Also I have had my severe lower back problems since I was 20 when I returned to work from holidays and started lifting 20 foot lengths of I inch Dia steel rods above my head to put them on a rack.
    As I have said previously, I didn't make any changes (Apart from Monitoring my blood sugar for a year or 2 with no serious changes) after diagnosis. I have lived 31 years longer than my Father and give my self 10 minutes to 10 years and it will be as happy and comfy as I can make it. At 74 I can still cast a beach rod and swing a metal detector for 8 hrs a day with no pain at all, 5 minutes after opening the beer fridge.
    unicorn
    16th Sep 2014
    10:13am
    Rather than believe all the nonsense they feed you I would give away the drugs first & foremost. The drugs to which I refer are the B. P. tablets I am supposed to take acccording to my doctor. That would take away 2 points & would drop me to a safe level.


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