Foods that you need to avoid after you turn 50

Our nutritional needs change with different life stages.

Foods that you need to avoid after you turn 50

Our nutritional needs change with different life stages. To be fit and healthy, it is important to take into account the extra demands placed on your body by these changes. 

As well as shifting the balance to eating more fruit and vegetables and foods rich in fibre, this also means you will need to cut out or cut back on some foods. Here are the foods you should be avoiding as you age.

Potatoes
According to Time magazine, potatoes are very high on the glycaemic index, which means that they raise your blood sugar and insulin levels quickly. If you are going to eat potatoes, you can help your body’s digestion by boiling them and leaving them overnight in the fridge.

Butter
Cutting back on butter can greatly lower your cholesterol and reduce your risk of heart disease. While moderation is the key with butter, choosing healthier alternatives such as olive oil in cooking is a much better option.

Deli meats
Deli meats are full of sodium and fat, which you need to cut down on as you age. The sodium in one small serving of deli meat such as ham and salami ranges from 310 to 480 milligrams. A diet high in sodium is thought to increase the risk of high blood pressure, which is a major cause of heart disease and stroke. You can easily replace salami and ham in your sandwiches with sliced roast chicken or roast beef.

Grapefruit
Some foods can affect your medications and one of the biggest offenders is the humble grapefruit. If you take medication for high blood pressure, anxiety or insomnia, grapefruit may interact with the drugs. When your doctor prescribes medications, it is always worthwhile checking with them or a pharmacist if there are any foods that you should avoid.

High-salt foods
If you are 51 or over the recommended sodium intake is 2300 milligrams per day, but if you are in a high-risk group, you should make sure you eat no more than 1500mg of sodium each day. Too much sodium can raise your blood pressure and put you at a higher risk of heart attack and stroke. Some of the foods to avoid include frozen food, snack food and salad dressing.

Raw sprouts
Clover, alfalfa, radish, and mung bean sprouts are high in B vitamins and other nutrients, but raw sprouts can also pose a health threat to older Australians because they are grown in warm, humid conditions. This makes them more likely to harbour bacteria than other fresh produce. To enjoy sprouts safely, cook them thoroughly before eating.

Read more at WebMD

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    Disclaimer: This article contains general information about health issues and is not advice. For health advice, consult your medical practitioner.





    COMMENTS

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    jackie
    5th Jun 2019
    11:54am
    I sprout my own organic broccoli seeds. I think that if you do it yourself instead of buying you avoid the bacteria threat.

    It's so easy and convenient to sprout your own seeds. Make sure they are for sprouting and are organic whatever seeds you use.
    KSS
    5th Jun 2019
    1:20pm
    Being organic does not protect anything from bacteria. Unless you are doing your sprouting in sterile surroundings, with sterile equipment and yourself colthed in sterile protective clothing, you cannot avoid bacteria on your seeds or their growing environment. Organics has nothing to do with it.
    jackie
    5th Jun 2019
    3:26pm
    KSS, I never posted organic protects you from bacteria. I posted doing it yourself is safer.

    I consume organic produce because it's not exposed to pesticides has a nutrient content with better taste.

    When you sprout your own seeds you are meticulous with water changing and grow them in a clean environment, unlike commercial sprouts.
    musicveg
    9th Sep 2019
    12:18am
    I agree Jackie, it is important to grow your own, love sunflower sprouts, have not tried broccoli sprouts, cannot find the sprouting seeds to buy. I also buy organic as much as I can, have a wonderful weekly supplier at good prices, pesticides I think are a major factor in a lot of diseases too. Looking at the introduction of pesticides and the rise of cancers etc, it all makes sense.
    KB
    5th Jun 2019
    12:29pm
    We all know about moderation in salt. There is salt and sugar in all packaged I have been recommended to use iodized salt due to thyroid issues,
    jackie
    5th Jun 2019
    3:13pm
    Don't consume packaged food.
    jackie
    5th Jun 2019
    3:28pm
    KB, I recommend consuming seaweed. Sprinkle dried seaweed flakes on your food. It's good for the thyroid and contains plenty of iodine.
    KB
    5th Jun 2019
    12:29pm
    We all know about moderation in salt. There is salt and sugar in all packaged I have been recommended to use iodized salt due to thyroid issues,
    GiGi
    6th Jun 2019
    8:45am
    Deli meats are a no-no, yes, because of their vast salt and sat fat. But, if replacing them with roast chicken, as suggested, roast your own! (Packaged roast chicken is also high in salt, as are the hot roast chickens sold by supermarkets. If you don't believe the last bit, compare the taste of a supermarket roast chicken with the meat from a home-roasted chook).
    Franky
    7th Jun 2019
    1:13am
    Cooking sprouts? That would destroy all the nutrients produced by sprouting! I grow my own sprouts and consider it the easiest food to grow.
    musicveg
    9th Sep 2019
    12:16am
    Potatoes are good for you, so don't see why they are on the list, and you should always grow your own sprouts.


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