Four sex-drive supplements for women

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It’s no secret that, as we age, so too does our libido. The poor thing just gets worn out over the years, and the effects of age, health and how you feel about your relationship can dim your will to ‘get it on’.

Still, there are many who are willing but not necessarily able. You can eat and exercise all you like, but some people will require something a little stronger. That’s where libido enhancers come into the picture.

It goes without saying that before you take any type of supplement or medication, you should consult your doctor first – and at the very least, have exhausted the diet/exercise option.

Most libido enhancers are marketed to men, which is strange because, as we all know, it takes two to ‘tango’. You won’t often see an ad – either in print or online – that promotes sex-drive supplements for women. However, in the interests of ‘equality’ here are four for the girls.

Iron
Women low in iron – and men, for that matter – can suffer a diminished libido. A shortfall of iron also translates into reduced desire, arousal, lubrication and the ability to climax. If you get your iron levels in check you should notice an improvement in these departments. However, too much iron can be a bad thing. Taking more than 20mg a day can cause constipation and more than 60mg can be life-threatening.

Tribulus terrestris
Also known as puncture vine, this fruit-producing Mediterranean plant is, as the name suggests, covered with spines. The fruit, leaves and roots of the tribulus plant has been used for centuries as a medicine.

It’s typically marketed to men as a testosterone booster, but women with low sexual desire can also benefit from this herbal supplement. A standard dose is 85mg–250mg per day, but women who took 7.5mg of Tribulus terrestris every day for four weeks experienced increased desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm and sexual satisfaction.

Maca
Also known as Peruvian ginseng, maca is a South American root vegetable that can be consumed as is or in powdered form. If you’re lucky to find it fresh, you can roast it or mash it. You’ll most likely find it dried in a flour-like form, which is great, because it can be used for baking, added to smoothies or even brewed into a weak beer.

Because maca is a food, it’s fairly safe to try, but it can increase your estrogen levels, and should only be taken after advice from a health professional.

Panax ginseng
Otherwise known as Asian ginseng, panax ginseng can help increase desire and arousal in women who are going through menopause. A recent study showed that women who took a thrice daily one-gram dose for two weeks saw improvement in libido, including lubrication, desire, arousal and ability to orgasm.

And the good news is that it can also help your fella’s fella too, as doses of 900mg–1000mg a day can improve erectile function for men.

Don’t go overboard though, as Asian ginseng can cause insomnia and diarrhoea.

As with any change of medication, you’re best to talk to your GP for advice – don’t just go by the label on the bottle. Supplements don’t necessarily go through the same stringent testing as do medicines, so get the right advice before you try.

It’s also worth remembering that, although a diminished sex drive can be the result of a physical or dietary condition, a person’s mental condition can contribute just as much to a healthy sex life, and life in general. So, have a chat with your partner and be clear with each other how you feel about sex and, should you be on the same page, the good times will roll.

Read more at WebMD

Have you tried any of these supplements? Do you know of any others that may help our members?

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Written by Leon Della Bosca

Leon Della Bosca is a voracious reader who loves words. You'll often find him spending time in galleries, writing, designing, painting, drawing, or photographing and documenting street art. He has a publishing and graphic design background and loves movies and music, but then, who doesn’t?

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