Five common eye problems

On World Sight Day, we share five common eye problems of which you should be aware.

Five common eye problems

From the age of 40, it is normal to experience changes in your vision. At this time, the risks of developing certain eye conditions are much higher. It can be difficult for you to know whether you have begun to develop an eye problem that can lead to permanent vision loss, especially if left untreated. So, the best way to maintain good eye health is to have your eyes tested regularly.

On World Sight Day, we share common eye conditions of which to be aware – especially if you’re over 40.

Presbyopia – is the most common age-related vision condition, causing gradual loss of the ability to change the shape of the lens of your eye and focus at normal reading distance. It is usually treated with prescription glasses.

Cataract – a common condition where the lens becomes cloudy, causing gradual loss of vision. Treatment for cataracts involves surgery to replace your lens with one made of plastic. 

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) – involves the loss of core vision needed to read, drive and recognise faces. Your risk of developing AMD is higher if it runs in your family. While you can’t change your genes or your age, there are some precautions you can take to reduce your risk.

Glaucoma – arises from increased pressure in the eyeball, which can cause progressive damage to the optic nerve cells, leading to loss of peripheral vision. It is common for sufferers not to realise they have glaucoma until irreparable damage has been done. Therefore it must be diagnosed and treated early.

Diabetic retinopathy – if you have diabetes, it can impact your vision by affecting the blood vessels behind your eye, leading to serious vision loss. The treatment relies on early detection and laser treatment.

To find out what you can do to keep your eyes healthy, read our article on how to 'Reduce your risk of vision loss'.





    COMMENTS

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    8th Oct 2015
    10:31am
    There is also the "wandering eye" which has gotten many a man, and woman, into trouble.
    Libby
    8th Oct 2015
    10:33pm
    You're cheeky, I'd say you have a "wandering eye"! Is your past time watching the pretty ladies go by while you're sipping a latte?
    Blossom
    23rd Oct 2015
    8:49pm
    Fast Eddie, I know the others are stirring but I am pretty sure I know what you mean. My left eye turns outwards. I hate playing tennis as I continuously miss-judge the position of the ball and miss it. That is how I discovered I had a problem --at high school. I went to an orthoptist and did eye exercises for awhile. My Mum discovered it is prominent when I am tired. A young child, a relative has the same problem and sees double without prescription glasses. I have what is known as a prism in mine. Originally mine was called "floating vision" but it does have a technical name. I took a young one to a tennis court for a few hits during the school holidays. We both got frustrated as I kept missing the ball. I get some strange looks from others sometimes. It can be embarrassing. I was recently told that I have a small cataract on my right eye. So now I have 2 eye problems. Hopefully nothing else as we only have one pair of eyes. There is also a family history of Glaucoma. My Grandma and one of her cousins had it.
    Fran
    8th Oct 2015
    10:53am
    Oh Fast Eddie you are a crack-up!

    I am keen to let people know that I have "sun damage" to the eyes, have never heard of this before my Eye Specialist told me!
    So when I see people not only without hats, but sun glasses as well, it saddens me, as we have so much knowledge about these things now.
    Not everything is straight forward either, last year I had cataracts done in both eyes, I have just had to have one eye repaired so to speak, from a complication post cataract op,
    its not as rare as you might think so it seems.
    So its best to get as much information as you can, then weigh up the risks!
    I must say its a blessing to be able to do away with glasses though!
    Arisaid
    8th Oct 2015
    2:11pm
    Having worked for an Eye Specialist for many years, please, please, please would you check the vision in each eye daily. i.e. when you get up close one eye to see if you can 'see' then do the other eye. You would be amazed at the number of people who lose vision in one eye and have no idea that they had or when it happened.
    didi
    8th Oct 2015
    10:19pm
    Glaucoma and eventual blindness runs in my family. Due to this I get checked by a specialist Opthamologist every 6 months for eye pressure and I use drops each night in both eyes. Having seen my Grandmother, a great-aunt and father lose their sight I am so glad that I am able to be checked for the condition.
    Libby
    8th Oct 2015
    10:29pm
    Back in 2000 I had laser surgery done to both eyes ($4000) and boy was I happy not to wear glasses except for reading. I have myopia and vision was great after that. Just recently I had my left eye cataract removed so the laser ones had to come out as well, now I'm back to the blurred vision in one eye until the hospital approved my second lens to be inserted. Very pleased once again not to wear glasses and I can still wear sunnies without prescription or el cheapo $5 glasses for reading! Even the eye specialist say the cheap ones are safe to use for reading! At the moment I am walking around with one eye closed and wearing my old computer/reading glasses which is slightly difficult. Not pleasant when out shopping, I have to watch my step on public transport. One good thing is I can read without glasses but it's still too blurry.
    arrangirl
    9th Oct 2015
    12:06am
    I recently suffered from Acute Glaucoma caused by developing cataracts blocking the quarter drainage in the eye and raising the internal pressure. I'd had no glaucoma symptoms before I woke up with a splitting headache, nausea and seeing lines and lights out of my eye.
    Treatment was either with laser to improve drainage or removal of the cataracts which were the cause of the problem. I opted for the latter and have just got glasses changed to give me better vision for night driving and can wear regular "sunnies" for the first time in years.
    I count my blessings that I could access excellent medical care in good time as this can be a "medical emergency" and at worst can cause loss of sight.
    inquisitive
    5th Jul 2018
    3:05pm
    what about dry eyes, there is no mention of that. I need to use lubricating drops many times each day, including during the night. I also have to beware of air conditioning or space heating, including in the car, I close the vent nearest me. Fish and lots of fruit & veg doesn't seem to make any difference. I do find that cooled boiled water drops provide as much relief as proprietry drops for dry eyes.


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