How eHealth technology really works

The validity of the National Broadband Network (NBN) has been hotly debated in government buildings, boardrooms and lounge rooms across Australia. Regardless of which side of the argument you find yourself on, you can’t help but be intrigued by the advancement of ehealth solutions which will benefit from the implementation of the NBN.

health, ehealth, google doctor, technology, doctor, nurse, computer, internet, online

The validity of the National Broadband Network (NBN) has been hotly debated in government buildings, boardrooms and lounge rooms across Australia. Regardless of which side of the argument you find yourself on, you can’t help but be intrigued by the advancement of eHealth solutions which will benefit from the implementation of the NBN.

Accessing specialist medical assistance can be difficult for those living in rural areas of Australia. Indeed, even getting an appointment with a specialist when you live close to cities can be a challenge. eHealth solutions such as video conferencing can make such services more accessible and affordable to all.

The Federal Government has announced a $620 million initiative, Connecting Health Services with the Future, which offers doctors up-front payments and rebates to enable them to invest in the necessary technology to provide such services. This will combine with the launch of Telstra’s range of simplified software and devices aimed at making this vital technology more accessible.

As with most things online, security and privacy concerns can be difficult for new users to overcome. Telstra Business Group Managing Director Will Irving assured potential patients that consultations were private.

Patients will no longer have to travel to have a consultation with a specialist and with the specialist being able to remain in one place, they too can see more patients without the need to travel between medical facilities.

Would you use teleconferencing to consult with specialist medical providers? Or do you have a concern about the privacy of such systems?





    COMMENTS

    To make a comment, please register or login
    terrib
    2nd Dec 2011
    4:34pm
    I would consider a virtual consultation. If privacy could be maintained I think it would save a lot of money and time. I can often wait months to get an appointment, then the problem of getting to that appointment crops up as I am disabled and cannot drive long distance. I can see where it could probably be held in a consultants room set up for that purpose and not from the home computer, maybe then privacy could be upheld.


    Join YOURLifeChoices, it’s free

    • Receive our daily enewsletter
    • Enter competitions
    • Comment on articles