Ways that you can lower your risk of osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a common condition that affects joints of the body.

Ways that you can lower your risk of osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is a common condition that affects joints of the body. It causes structural changes within a joint or multiple joints, resulting in pain and loss of function.

Osteoarthritis is associated with a number of factors, including genetic, mechanical, hormonal and inflammatory factors. It is not just a disease of ageing or an ‘older persons’ disease, which means there are things that you can do to lower your risk of developing the condition.

Any joint in the body can be affected by osteoarthritis. Most commonly, it is the larger weight-bearing joints, such as knees and hips, that are most affected.

Here are some of the ways that you can lower your chances of developing osteoarthritis.

Maintaining a healthy weight
People who are overweight or obese are strongly encouraged to lose weight. Excess weight can stress your joints and wear away the soft cartilage at the end of your bones more easily. Also, extra fat on your body may release chemicals than can inflame joints, which can also lead to osteoarthritis. Your doctor will be able to tell you the right weight range for your body size and age.

Exercise
Not only does exercise help to maintain a healthy weight, it also can increase your level of mobility and help stave off osteoarthritis. A health professional such as an exercise physiologist or physiotherapist can provide you with an individualised exercise program that is tailored to your needs. 

Appropriate exercise for osteoarthritis includes strength training, stretching, aerobic and balance programs. Such programs can be undertaken at home or as part of a group, and depending upon your preference you can do them on land or in water. 

Prepare properly for exercise
Don’t just jump straight into the deep end when it comes to exercising. You should always loosen up muscles, ligaments, tendons and joints before exerting yourself physically to avoid doing a serious injury, but a good warm-up before any strenuous activity also helps prevent osteoarthritis.

Also start any new exercise activity slowly before picking up the pace to protect against suffering a cartilage injury.

Eat more fish
Foods that are rich in omega-3 fatty acids, such as salmon, tuna and cod, can help lessen inflammation that can be hard on your joints.

Do you suffer from osteoarthritis? What do you do to alleviate the symptoms?

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    COMMENTS

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    Agnes
    12th Feb 2020
    1:01pm
    I see from the news reports this am that glucosamine is no longer recommended.It apparently has proven to be of no use, and can exacerbate diabetes as well as causing anaphylactic reactions. Must admit I did try it and it was totally useless.
    PlanB
    12th Feb 2020
    2:09pm
    Yes Agnes and the Drs were so keen to get you onto it too -- shows that they do not know half of what the prescribed
    johninmelb
    14th Feb 2020
    7:50pm
    I doubt very much it was doctors telling people to use it, point the finger at all those useless vitamin companies that have sprung up like mushrooms in the last 20 years of so. They are the ones who were flogging it like there was no tomorrow.

    My doctor told me 20 years ago to not waste my money on any of that rubbish.

    Moral of the story - change your doctor. My doctor doesn't know everything, none of them do, it is impossible to keep up with ever changing medical break throughs etc. BUT - my doctor says he doesn't know and he's goes away and finds out, and gets back to me.
    PlanB
    15th Feb 2020
    10:23am
    This was advised by a SPECIALIST to a friend of mine before he had his knees done
    KB
    12th Feb 2020
    2:26pm
    I tried fish oil but still needed hip operations.
    KB
    12th Feb 2020
    2:26pm
    I tried fish oil but still needed hip operations.
    PlanB
    12th Feb 2020
    2:48pm
    I am slim tiny and never over weight -- always active -- but I still have it especially in my hands /spine
    johninmelb
    14th Feb 2020
    7:58pm
    I have osteoarthritis in my right knee and both hips. Also have lower back problems. Some days are quite painful, mostly my back more than knee or hips. I push myself out the door every single day, rain, hail or shine and walk for about 40 -60 minutes. Some days I am a bit slower. After about 10 minutes I am walking straighter, and the pain has eased considerably. Any exercise is better than just sittling on the couch watching TV and swallowing painkillers that turn you into a zombie. Next week I am starting the GLAD program for osteoarthritis. The object of that is to try and prevent knee replacement surgery which I don't want anyway. But it is also going to help my hips as well.


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