5th Apr 2017
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Psoriasis: seven ways to ditch the itch at home
Psoriasis hand

If you experience recurring itchy skin with dry, red patches, you could have psoriasis. Psoriasis is actually an autoimmune disorder, beginning deep inside your immune system. It comes from your T cells, which are designed to help protect the body from infection and disease. When these white blood cells are accidentally triggered, it can lead to psoriasis symptoms.

There’s no cure for psoriasis, but there are many effective methods to help ease symptoms. Here are seven treatments you can try at home to help ditch the itch.

1. Add some cream

Sometimes, a heavy cream can be the answer. You could try a thick cream moisturiser or petroleum jelly, both of which help to lock in moisture, reduce redness and assist the skin in healing. You could also try wrapping the affected areas in cling wrap or tight clothing (such as socks or gloves) overnight for an extra moisture boost. It might be best to avoid heavily scented products, as these can aggravate the skin further.

2. Get some sun

Some studies suggest that the sun’s ultraviolet B rays can help fight psoriasis, so when the itch persists, try to spend some time in the great outdoors. Remember to wear sun smart protective clothing and apply sunscreen to areas without psoriasis. Avoiding spending more than five to 10 minutes in the sun.

3. Take a dip

A salt water bath with Dead Sea or Epsom salts can do wonders to soothe dry, flaky skin. Enjoy a nice long soak, and apply an unscented moisturiser afterwards to seal in moisture.

4. Feel the burn

Chilli has long been recognised for its internal anti-inflammatory properties, but capsaicin, the ingredient that makes chilli hot, may also help reduce skin ailments. Some research suggests applying a topical over-the-counter cream where capsaicin is a main ingredient can cut pain, inflammation and redness. Be warned, some people may experience a burning sensation when they apply it.

5. Add some spice

If you love your curry, this cure will please you. The distinctive yellow herb, turmeric, often found in curry sauce, can help to reduce psoriasis flare ups. It has been known as a healing spice for centuries, and contains the active ingredient curcumin, which has anti-inflammatory properties. You can try adding it to your meals or taking a supplement.

6. Tea tree oil

For relief from itching, and to reduce redness, try tea tree oil. The tea tree is native to Australia and is commonly used as an essential oil and as an active ingredient in many lotions and shampoos. It’s often used to fight skin conditions, such as acne, and has a reputation for clearing up nail infections and reducing inflammation. If you plan to use pure tea tree oil, dilute it with a carrier oil, such as almond or macadamia oil, as pure tea tree oil can burn the skin.

7. Change your diet

With a focus on fish, vegetables, fruits, nuts and olive oil, the Mediterranean diet is touted as one of the most beneficial in the world. Not only has it been found to help boost physical health and help reduce inflammation, the Mediterranean diet has also been linked to better mental health. The most important features of the Mediterranean diet are the healthy fats, found in fish and olive oil, so generally consuming more omega-3 fatty acids is a good idea to help ditch the itch.

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    COMMENTS

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    Supernan
    10th Apr 2017
    2:42pm
    Who is resposible for saying that Tumeric has been used for centuries to control disease ? Its just a form of ginger eaten in asian countries. And those countries have just as much if not more psorasis & other inflammatory diseases or auto immune diseases that we do. There is no research using double blind scientific studies proving it works.
    Chris_58
    17th Apr 2017
    9:20am
    I have not long ago developed psoriasis and have tried tea tree oil and turmeric - both of which did nothing. When I was diagnosed with psoriasis, I asked my doctor if it was an autoimmune problem and he said it was. So I said instead of giving me something to hide the problem, why dont we look at what is causing the problem? I could have kicked him, because all he did was shrug his shoulders...........
    musicveg
    17th Apr 2017
    1:19pm
    That is a typical response from a doctor not interested in causes, they are only trained to treat symptoms. You need to do your research and see why your immune system is not working right, be it food, stress or whatever. Maybe see a good recommended naturopath. Good luck.
    Polly
    17th Apr 2017
    2:59pm
    Hi Chris,
    Unfortunately most doctors are not open to searching for the cause of diseases but instead are focussed on treating the symptoms.
    However, there are some doctors and scientists who are extremely focussed on establishing possible causes of disease and who place a high value on preventative medicine.
    As a result, 1,000s of peer-reviewed studies have established a link between auto-immune conditions, such as psoriasis, and Oxidative Stress (the build up of free radical damage). They have found that reducing Oxidative Stress via Nrf2 Activation can have a dramatic impact on such conditions.
    The most powerful Nrf2 Activator on the market is an all-natural herbal blend. For more info go to:
    paulamcarroll.au.lifevantage.com
    Rob
    17th Apr 2017
    10:01am
    Just slapped on some Caroline's Cream made here in WA. See carolineskincare.com.au
    Chris_58
    17th Apr 2017
    2:01pm
    Is it good, Rob?
    Rob
    17th Apr 2017
    7:59pm
    Chris. My skin irritations are certainly nothing like the picture accompanying this article; nor have I been diagnosed with psoriasis. Sorry, I may have popped into this discussion a bit out off my depth. I get dry itchy skin, not those red patches though. Trust you get some significant relief soon.
    Ted Ted
    17th Apr 2017
    4:39pm
    I had mild psoriasis that showed here and there. I tried everything and nothing helped for good. Then I heard about Cistus Laurifolius (there is few species, all good). This is a herb. Latin name here as I am not sure about English name. After 3 months of regularly drinking a cup a day all my psoriasis disappeared. Maybe it will not help everybody but this herb is cheap so it is worth trying.
    BundyGil
    17th Apr 2017
    4:40pm
    Coal tar and salicylic acid preparations are recognised.treatments for psoriasis and ezcema. Nothing works 100% for everyone so you.just have to try different treatments until you find what works for you.
    Reggie000
    17th Apr 2017
    4:59pm
    I find it quite irresponsible that you say there is no cure for psoriasis? My husband had an acute outbreak of psoriasis over 15 years ago, which resulted in extreme skin lesions on his hands, feet & scalp, to the point he couldn't walk properly. He had seen numerous doctors and specialists over the years to no avail. At that time, he saw a new GP who suggest he visit the Janesce skincare clinic at Norwood and consult one of their naturopaths. In brief, his toenails and fingernails had fallen off by that stage, he could only hobble in ugg boots due to the severity of his cracked & bleeding feet and was severely depressed due to his worsening condition. After his initial consult with the naturopath at Janesce, he altered his diet, used a few topical and oral natural products and saw results within a couple of weeks. Within two months all symptoms of his psoriasis disappeared and has never returned. He has been mindful of avoiding certain food/drinks ever since and so far has no ongoing problems. I would urge anyone with this cruel affliction to try a reputable Naturopath and work with them to obtain the best results. My husband may no be 'cured' as you say, but with over 15 years now with no further flare ups it seems like a cure to me (and him!) Using steroid based creams will only serve to push to problem under the surface without dealing with the cause and lead to further issues later in life.
    Blossom
    30th Apr 2017
    11:33pm
    Some returned servicemen from WW11 developed it on their elbows and knees. Some were hospitalised a few times over the years.
    Blossom
    30th Apr 2017
    11:41pm
    Epsom Salts in a bath is very good. A friend of mine had chronic dermatitis. She was allergic to the medication she was given and all her skin peeled and dropped off onto the floor in flakes.(you could see it on plain floor covering) It was horrible. This was many years ago. Until she could get another appt. she had a lot of epsom salts baths and applied Vaseline to moisturise it to relieve the itching, pain (not just soreness) and redness.
    Courtney
    9th Oct 2018
    1:55am
    I have psoriasis on my hands and feet for which I have tried numerous creams to no avail. I found dermalmd psoriasis serum online and thought, well it won't hurt to try it, as I was desperate for some relief without going on prescription medication. Dermalmd is the best cream I have ever used to help control my psoriasis. I try to keep it on hand and order multiple bottles at a time so I don't run out. So glad that I stumbled across this serum.


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