Link found between common sleep disorder and Alzheimer’s

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Researchers have identified brain changes that explain for the first time why sleep apnoea increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s.

The research, led by Dr Géraldine Rauchs from the University of Caen Normandy, France, studied the effects of sleep apnoea on 127 older adults who were taking part in the Age Well clinical trial of the Silver Santé Study.

The volunteers, with a mean age of 69, completed neuropsychological assessments (tests to assess how the brain is working), polysomnography (to assess sleep quality and potential sleep disorders) tests and neuroimaging scans.

Those participants with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB or types of sleep apnoea) showed greater amyloid burden (protein deposits in the brain), GM volume (number of brain cells) and metabolism (how these cells use glucose for their activity) in brain areas particularly vulnerable to Alzheimer’s – increasing their risk of developing the disease in coming years.

No association was found with cognition, self-reported cognitive and sleep difficulties or excessive daytime sleepiness symptoms.

“The results are very significant as although there was increased evidence suggesting sleep-disordered breathing (SBD) increases the risk of developing Alzheimer’s, the brain mechanisms underlying the link were unclear,” explained Dr Rauchs.

“This study shows for the first time that SBD, or sleep apnoea, increases amyloid burden, GM volume and metabolism in brain areas particularly vulnerable to Alzheimer’s disease, increasing the risk of these individuals developing the disease in the future.

“This doesn’t mean, of course, that these participants will necessarily develop Alzheimer’s – just that their risk of developing the disease in future is increased.

“Fortunately, there are effective treatments available for SDB but the results of this study re-emphasise the importance of preserving good sleep quality throughout life in order to safeguard good mental health in later life.”

Do you suffer from sleep apnoea? Are you worried about developing Alzheimer’s disease later in life?

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Written by Ben

12 Comments

Total Comments: 12
  1. 0
    0

    Worrying about what might or might not happen to you in the future will probably do you more harm than having sleep aponea. Live your life to the full each day and don’t worry about what may or may not happen. Your brain could also get knocked out by anaesthetic if you need an unexpected operation so what’s the point of worrying. Too many of YLC articles are depressing rather than informative for this age group.

  2. 0
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    I couldn’t agree more, Hardworker. I’m sick to death of scare tactics

    • 0
      0

      These are just informative articles, read them or don’t but after looking after my mother-in-law and now father with dementia, any assistance in how to live to limit this demeaning disease is helpful.
      Now we need the legal world to catch up with the need to be able to control your death when you can no longer control your life.

  3. 0
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    Both my Parents had undiagnosed sleep aponea. I was diagnosed with sleep aponea in 1999 and have used a cpap machine every night since then. My Parents did not develop Alzheimers and their brains did not suffer! I am still alert, aware, fully functioning in the brain department!!! I agree with the sentiments expressed by fellow commenters on this subject!

  4. 0
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    I have been diagnosed with severe sleep aponea but can’t see the point of having equipment over my face etc each night at 85. My mother was 99, died in her sleep, probably had sleep apnea as her snoring was like the 1812 overture so to die in your sleep would be far preferable to dementia.

  5. 0
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    My husband had sleep apnea for many years, and now has progressive dementia. Whether there is a connection, who knows?

  6. 0
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    It looks like another attempt to find an excuse for dementia and Alzheimers other than the obvious culprits – fluoride in water and insecticides and herbicides in our food. Why? Because our governments approve, even mandate, all the poisons, and they can’t be held responsible can they?

  7. 0
    0

    I started out taking only Azilect, then Mirapex for my Parkinson disease, as the disease progressed they didn’t help much. A year ago I started on PD TREATMENT PROTOCOL from Herbal Health Point (ww w. herbalhealthpoint. c om). One month into the treatment, I made a significant recovery, my symptoms were gone including tremors . Its been months since I completed the treatment, I am symptom free and I live a very product life

  8. 0
    0

    I started out taking only Azilect, then Mirapex for my Parkinson disease, as the disease progressed they didn’t help much. A year ago I started on PD TREATMENT PROTOCOL from Herbal Health Point (ww w. herbalhealthpoint. c om). One month into the treatment, I made a significant recovery, my symptoms were gone including tremors . Its been months since I completed the treatment, I am symptom free and I live a very product life

  9. 0
    0

    That’s great news, reneewollitz. Seeing as Herbal Health Point is in the US, did you email them or use live chat?


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