30th Oct 2014
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Tips to lower blood pressure
Tips to lower blood pressure

Have you had your blood pressure checked recently? At least one-quarter of Australian adults have high blood pressure, and while a person of any age can have the condition, more than half of these with high blood pressure are aged over 60. 

A doctor can check your blood pressure using a simple test. This is the only way to know your blood pressure health.

According to The Heart Foundation:

Normal blood pressure: generally less than 120/80 mmHg

Normal to high blood pressure: between 120/80 and 140/90 mmHg

High blood pressure: 140/90 mmHg or higher

High blood pressure (hypertension) can be caused by a number of things, such as stress, poor health or nutrition, lack of exercise or a heredity predisposition.  The good news is that lowering and maintaining a healthy blood pressure usually only means making a few small changes.


1. Healthy eating 

Maintaining a healthy, balanced diet is imperative to lowering your blood pressure and keeping it at a healthy level. Be sure to include plenty of foods from the five major food groups, including fruits, vegetables, grains, lean meats and dairy.

Drinking enough water (around two litres per day) is highly recommended.


2. Reduce the salt 

Excessive salt in the diet is the one of the most common reasons for high blood pressure. Australians are recommended to consume less than 4g, or 1,600mg of sodium, per day. This is no more than a teaspoon. 

The easiest way to reduce salt in your diet is to cut out processed foods, and stop adding it to your meals. If you are the person who is responsible for cooking meals, always make sure to taste the food as you go, and see if it needs salt.

As a person ages, their tastebuds start fading, so the taste of food isn’t as strong. This can lead to excessive use of salt to try to bring back the flavours. Instead of piling on the sodium, try using alternatives to amp-up the flavour, such as chillies, spices and herbs.

Another way to consume less salt is to stop it entering the house. When you’re shopping, check the dietary labels on the back of food packets. Look for foods with 120mg of sodium per 100g or less.


Click NEXT for more simple tips which will help to keep your blood pressure low.

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    COMMENTS

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    HOLA
    7th Nov 2014
    1:27pm
    Blood pressure can be related to stress. I have a B.P. machine at home - it usually shows good readings, but when ever I go to the Doctor, it always gives a higher reading. Doctor says I have a condition called "White Coat Syndrome". I take blood pressure tablets and I'm sure they do their job, but it's visiting the Doctor which I hate.
    KSS
    7th Nov 2014
    2:02pm
    Very common Hola and assuming you take the reading correctly - and I am sure you do - nothing to worry about. Take your machine with you next time you go so the GP can see the usual reading for him/herself.
    musicveg
    7th Nov 2014
    8:52pm
    2 litres of water a day is a bit much, unless you don't eat fruit and vegetables. Stop eating processed foods which are high in salt and other nasties which after your overall health. Eat wholefoods as natural as possible. Lower meat intake, twice a week is enough. And stay away from processed meats. Why take medication if you can control it with diet, exercise and not stressing.Time to slow down if you have HBP.
    Blossom
    8th Nov 2014
    8:41pm
    Limiting alcohol also reduces the risk of liver disease
    Huskie
    22nd Jun 2017
    12:22pm
    The comment "Normal to high blood pressure: between 120/80 and 140/90 mmHg" is misleading. It should say the "average range of blood pressure is ....."
    My GP advised me that recent research suggests that your blood pressure is your blood pressure and it may not fit into that range but still be okay for you. My father lived to a healthy 96 years of age with blood pressure in the range of 110 to 150 from the age of 35.


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