15th Jul 2015
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Australia’s ‘unskilled’ youth

Australians are more qualified than ever before but concerns have arisen that the number of skilled workers is decreasing, particularly amongst young Australians.

Employers are reporting that whereas young people who have developed skills working in the country are likely to appreciate every dollar they make, those who live and study in more affluent areas and who are used to seeing money, are less willing to get their hands dirty.

Australia Chamber of Commerce and Industry CEO Kate Carnell says that in Australia, many young people in their 20s are coming out of university and training programs with academic or theoretical skills that ultimately leave them “disconnected with the workforce” and lacking in real workplace experience.

Jack Trenamen, a mining contractor and employer in Queensland, says there’s a generation of newcomers to the workforce who are unprepared for work. “They come in late, they don’t realise that they might have to do things they don’t want to and they don’t appreciate the job. They think if they don’t like it here they can just pack up and get another job around the corner, keep chasing that almighty dollar without building their skills.”

Carnell says that many tertiary qualified young people from affluent areas have issues understanding that “a job is about turning up on time every day, not just when you feel like, that it’s about taking direction, and basic things like you’ve got to be well presented and you’ve got to be pleasant.”

“The number of young people not working while they’re in school is one of the problems,” Carnell says. Current ABS unemployment figures show that youth unemployment is at 20 per cent – as high as it has been since June 1997.

Read more at The Guardian

Read more at news.com.au

Opinion: What is ‘skilled’, anyway?

It’s difficult to believe that skilled work in Australia is really under threat. There will always be kids out there training-up to be hairdressers, mechanics, chefs and builders. University study doesn’t suit everyone, and those who prefer skilled, hands-on employment will seek it out.

It’s true that more Australians are more qualified on paper than ever. Some young people are piling qualifications onto their CVs, only to leave university finding that they have very few practical ‘employable ’skills. But their qualifications provide them with skills that are relevant. Far from unskilled, these people get jobs writing government policies, working in newsrooms and assisting with community organisation projects.

Living in Melbourne, one of the most expensive cities in the world, most of the students I knew during my undergrad degree had no choice but to work. These were kids living out of home, supporting themselves through their full-time degrees by working 20-plus hours per week in hospitality, community organisations and internships. They studied for the love of learning and self-development.

There is a growing disconnect between the Australian workforce and the skills that young workers are emerging from the educations system with. As the education level rises, people are increasingly seeking jobs that will satisfy their desires and as their financial needs. Employers, particularly in agricultural and trades sectors, complain that skilled workers are few and far between. This disconnect is ultimately about attitudes – workers want jobs that will fulfill them; employers want inexpensive workers who don’t need training-up.

While youth unemployment is at its highest since 1997, we can’t say it’s for lack of trying that young people aren’t employed – because we all know the current employment problem in this country. 

An ABS report from 2013 shows that the labour force has seen some significant changes over the past 30 years. In 1976, over two thirds (71 per cent) of young adults were employed and less than one third (30 per cent) of young adults had obtained a non-school qualification. Only 5 per cent had a bachelor degree or higher qualification.

By contrast, in 2011, 74 per cent of young adults were employed and over half 52 per cent had a non-school qualification. Around a quarter (26%) had a bachelor degree or higher qualification.

Rather than the bleak image we are fed about young Australian university students, what is clear to me is that young Australians are actually working harder than ever before to become qualified for work they will enjoy.

What is your take on this issue? Are young Australians developing new skills to suit our modern society or is there a fundamental mismatch between the qualifications of the Australian workforce and the skills required in the real world?





    COMMENTS

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    Renny
    15th Jul 2015
    10:19am
    Since when were trades unskilled? A limited viewpoint. Hands on work requires specific and important skills.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    2:06pm
    That has been Amended now to Imported Skills ! :-)
    Tib
    15th Jul 2015
    11:09am
    High school and Uni education do NOT have enough practice components so students have lot if theory but little practice experience. Also Uni degrees often contain a lot if units irreverent to the major topic. Should do 12 units in the majors topic and forget about doing all the non relevant elective units. That way degrees would be finished quicker have practice components and be less expensive. But this will probably never happen as Uni are very slow to change and modernize
    Wstaton
    15th Jul 2015
    12:19pm
    Plus they do not want to give up the money if they made degrees more relevant and shorter.
    marls
    15th Jul 2015
    12:37pm
    so true, when i did my degree most of it was a load of crap not relevant to my chosen degree.
    also govt depts employing very young psychologists who have just finished uni. to treat criminals in the system. many of these young people have no life experience, never had a major issues and never had to go without many coming from wealthy families. trying to treat criminals raised in an abusive families with drugs, alcohol and poverty.
    Oars
    15th Jul 2015
    7:03pm
    Tib you are mostly correct- but you missed one important fact- that the modern university ncourse s cater for just about everything that you can imagine. One degree was study of ancient History of the Indonesian political system, How wonderfull that person must feel after majoring in that, to find out he is out of touch with modern politics- especially in Indonesia. There are over 300 "degrees" most of which are there to satisfy the lazy academics who want the social tag of "going to uni". The majors like Architecture Engineering Law, Science, and Economics are apparently too hard, so we end up with thousands of "educated" socially acceptable twaddle-talking nit wits who are only good for dish washing or a job in Canberra- or worse(better) still POLITICS> !!!! P.S There is nothing wrong with dish washing- it saves power and keeps the legs strong.!!!
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    7:51pm
    Yes Oars. Curriculum has been watered down for decades. It is no longer permitted to publish a student's results lest they are demoralised and schools have become places where kids choose to learn and then blame the system for their lack of success. It is unbelievable that kids get to university whilst being semi-literate. God help us!
    Luchar
    15th Jul 2015
    10:09pm
    How right you are, Mick!!
    At the recent NSW State elections, Opposition leader, Luke Foley, went to the election promising that, if elected, he would put specialist Maths and Science teachers into State Primary Schools. To start with, this was nonsense, because there are already insufficient qualified Maths and Science teachers for our High Schools. However, the most frightening aspect of his promise was the implication that after six years of High School education, followed by four years at University, we are graduating teachers with a Master of Teaching degree, but who are seen as being incapable of successfully teaching basic Primary School Maths and Science. As you so rightly say, mick, "God help us".
    Maree
    15th Jul 2015
    11:17am
    What do we expect when our government degrade our Tafe system. As a manager, I knew that if an employee had completed or was completing a Tafe course, they would be reaching an acceptable standard. Now the whole training system is a dog's breakfast.
    marls
    15th Jul 2015
    12:42pm
    i worked for the govt and it was sickening and degrading seeing the amount of people being employed who did not have any qualifications. there is no such thing as a merit process. the descriptions would state qualification were a desirable the job for professional staff treating the most damaged and vunerable in society
    jackie
    15th Jul 2015
    1:09pm
    Marie they all demand related qualifications now. An uneducated person is just as capable of doing the job as an educated one. They have qualifications for kitchen hands, waiters, cleaners, some trades, designers etc. that doesn't make them any better than their predessors. There are many qualified people today that can't get jobs due to no experience.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    1:24pm
    I went from a Hornby OO Gauge in a Government Department to a High Speed Passenger Train Driver, and never damaged anybody in the vulnerable society ! :-)
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    7:52pm
    "Education" is becoming a museum exhibit educating the leaders of the future.
    Stretch
    15th Jul 2015
    11:27am
    There seems to be quite a lot of casual, under-paid work out there available to young people. I'm talking about the multitude of cafes that pay young workers $10 per hour. For instance, Flinders Lane in Melbourne's CBD is a haven for illegally remunerated employees. I hope the critics of young people are not defending those sort of employers and their complaints about young workers. But to get a real job - an ongoing, legal pay rates job that is full time - is almost like winning the lottery for a young person these days, especially if the person doesn't have a tertiary qualification. I think many young people go to University to get a degree because they have no other option - little chance of a real job and studying at least gives you an income for three or so years. With the debt they've built up, no wonder their expectations are high.

    I avoid giving anecdotes as they do not prove much at all. However, I will in this case. My daughter is competing for one trainee-ship at a very large and wealthy Council against at least a dozen others. This is for two year's employment at $13 per hour. The Council is opening up one - just one - traineeship. Those competing for it almost all have a degree. They come a wide variety of backgrounds.
    Oars
    15th Jul 2015
    7:09pm
    I am puzzled at your comment about work being "underpaid". One of this country's downfall is the overpayment of unskilled workers. That does nothing to encourage these folks to get skills as they have the same pay as a better skilled worker. The time has come when the market decides- despite the howls from Trade Hall- that seems to work in other PRODUCTIVE countries. Our goods made here are too costly and that is why much of the manufacturing is going offshore, and will keep going that way till we get smarter and sell our skills to overseas manufacturers. Economists have been saying this for years, but the dreamers have been too powerful and too protective.
    Pass the Ductape
    16th Jul 2015
    9:19am
    Oars - overpayment of unskilled workers? Since when has an unskilled labourer get well over a hundred dollars an hour for their labour? Every business person charges what the market will bear - no matter the quality and if those workers in Australia were to drop their wages by 50% today, do you think business would seize the opportunity to price their product accordingly? No - they would simply pocket the difference! You can't blame any labourer or unskilled worker for trying to get the best price for his/her labour. Every business around the world attempts to get the best price for their commodity and as the unskilled labourer has only their labour to bargain with, then I for one don't blame them for doing so. They after all, a part of the capitalist system like it or not. Or would you prefer to go back to the old ways where slaves worked for their keep only?
    BrianP
    15th Jul 2015
    11:28am
    Many people delve too deeply into the problem, looking for complicated answers. There is a more basic, underlying need. Unless it is solved, our sons and daughters will have a bleak future.

    It is how well our children are taught about important life values such as taking responsibility for their actions and respect for other people's feelings and property. Also very important - understanding and appreciating just how much their parents do to provide for them.

    When a child grows up understanding these, they will be much better providing for themselves and their families. They will also make a better contribution to society and ultimately our country will be better run in their hands.

    It is one issue that has far reaching results in the big picture.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    12:44pm
    STREWTH Brian !! Mind popping around here and giving the Half Wits a lecture on those excellent Ethics and Morals ? But I hope You like Eggs and Tomatoes ! :-)
    FrankC
    15th Jul 2015
    1:43pm
    I agree with all you said (I'm not sure about particolors view ). We received a letter from our son stating how much he appreciated what we did for him, and teaching him by example of how to lead a decent life, respecting others and taking responsibility. This is a very sensible comment on this page today. Brian is not lecturing particolor, he is simply stating a fact of life; If you feel he is lecturing, then that must feel like a necessity to you.
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    8:03pm
    Parents have a lot to answer for. Values have been assigned to teachers (as has everything else...including actually teaching curriculum) as parents are otherwise occupied: work, the club, dinner out, the footy, watching the TV, etc.
    Clearly parents have failed and their broken children are due to their faults, not that of their schools.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    8:16pm
    I didn't say he was lecturing here ? I said He could come around our way if He likes to do that ! There are some that need Ethics training !! PS.. Big Time !
    OlderandWiser
    15th Jul 2015
    12:10pm
    We have a Federal Treasurer telling people the solution to unaffordable housing is to ''get a better job''. We have a government telling people they must work until age 70, regardless of the physical and mental demands their occupation imposes, and a Social Services Minister obsessed with kicking people who have worn their bodies out in hard work off disability and onto Newstart. We have employers and recruitment personnel rejecting anyone who can't impress with formal qualifications and showing no interest in giving someone a chance to demonstrate ability and a work ethic, let alone in someone whose age doesn't suit the employer's ideal preference.

    If we continue the current obsession with the idea that money is everything and spending more and more educating everyone to high levels, we will have nobody to fill the jobs that require more practical skills.

    Maybe its time to put less emphasis on pieces of paper and more on ability to demonstrate practical skills and diligence in the workplace. Maybe if we changed our hiring criteria and our reward structure to acknowledge the value of more practical skills and that theoretical knowledge isn't always worth a great deal, we would both solve this problem and reduce unemployment.

    First step might be to demonstrate some respect for people who work in physically demanding occupations and recognize that when their bodies are worn out, they need to be treated with fairness and compassion. Otherwise, who among our youth will want to go into such jobs? If we create a society where life is only tolerable for the highly educated and those with letters after their name, how can we expect young people to accept less rewarding work? Of course they are going to expect fat monetary rewards and high levels of job satisfaction if that is the mentality we continue to cultivate.
    Radish
    15th Jul 2015
    6:25pm
    With respect, the Treasurer did not say....get a better job...what he said wasx

    "Treasurer Joe Hockey has advised Australians wanting to buy their first home to "get a good job that pays good money".

    Personally I see absolutely nothing wrong with that...you do need a good job to be able to afford a mortgage these days.
    Oars
    15th Jul 2015
    7:14pm
    The answer to your queerie about who will fill the unskilled jobs- easy- under-skilled migrants who have already flooded the market here and will continue to do so while Sara Jane and Billie the Moron keep trudging off to "uni" to "get a better job". It is true that the migrants have strong work ethic and usually spend wisely- unlike certain sectors of our "educated" youth.
    Radish
    19th Jul 2015
    6:17pm
    My step son is an electrician with two companies and earns a darn sight more than a lot of uni students. You do not need a degree to earn good money in this country. I would advise any male or female wanting a job these day to get a trade.
    pete@nakedhydroponics
    15th Jul 2015
    12:15pm
    For decades we've been pushing kids to get that 'college' education, tacitly telling them only mugs get their hands dirty. Now we're surprised that kids don't want to get their hands dirty. Go figgur.
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    8:06pm
    And many who do start an apprenticeship do not want to work.
    Wstaton
    15th Jul 2015
    12:17pm
    Hmmm, This also seems to apply to politicians "Disconnected form the community and the workplace"
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    1:06pm
    There should be a Tafe Course for Politicians. :-)
    Course One... Political Correctness
    Course Two... Advanced Lying :-)
    Course Three... Question Sidewinding
    Course Four..... Perks Upgrading
    KSS
    15th Jul 2015
    1:40pm
    particolor there are those on this site who would say politicians have no need for this type of training, they are experts in all modules already! It would be a further waste of taxpayers money......
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    8:17pm
    Particolor: I can see the results for the end of year exams:
    Ethics class - fail
    Honesty class - fail
    Change the subject class - high distinction
    Straight face whilst lying class - high distinction
    Blame shifting class - high distinction
    Back stabbing class - distinction
    They'd never pass when they resat the failed subjects. So then they'd get their coal industry supporters to resit the Ethics and Honesty classes. Same result. Next get the Murdoch media managers to resit the Ethics and Honesty classes again. Same result.
    Problem solved: Rupert would buy the college. Result: all Labor candidates fail, all Liberal candidates pass...with high distinction. Results published in the morning edition.
    Ain't corruption wonderful when you own the game?
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    8:23pm
    After seeing the uproar today, I can see the Headlines tomorrow
    1,000 Chinese Coal Miners don't know if there Coming or Going ? :-)
    Pass the Ductape
    16th Jul 2015
    9:24am
    Particolor - no need for Tafe courses - they're doing so well on their own.
    jackie
    15th Jul 2015
    1:02pm
    Previous workers learned on the job and learned at home how to help around the home from a very early age. Employers should teaching their staff and keeping them like they used to. Casual employment is not productive for no one.
    KSS
    15th Jul 2015
    1:44pm
    Jackie, I never had a casual job that wasn't eventually offered to me as a permanent full time position. Just because it begins as casual work doesn't mean it can't or won't develop into something more. Reliable casual workers are worth their weight and it is those that get the spoils.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    2:04pm
    I was a Train Driver for nearly 40 Years ! And then they closed the Depot Down ?
    I said if id known the job wasn't going to be Permanent I would have never joined ! :-)
    jackie
    15th Jul 2015
    3:05pm
    KSS you have been fortunate but there are many people who have been working in a casual workforce for years. Unfortunately permanent work is like striking the lottery these days.
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    8:21pm
    particolor: and I thought you were a dame..........
    Think I saw your train in Japan. Shinkansen - 320 km/h. So fast that you get there before you leave. Definitely part time!
    jackie
    16th Jul 2015
    11:55am
    particolor you would have no chance of becoming a tram driver today. Thousands apply each year with a police check and driving history which they have to pay $70 -$80 for and if they don't pass the exams they don't even get to the interview stage. They get get rejected for failing in one of the variety of set exams which include computer games. The people that drive trams could never have passed the tests because they haven't a good grasp of English.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    1:29pm
    Working in Newsrooms !! :-) :-) :-)
    That made My Day ! :-)
    What did they learn in there nowadays ? How not to let the Truth get mixed up with the Real Story ! :-) :-)
    KSS
    15th Jul 2015
    1:46pm
    and the long boozy lunches are a thing of the past too!
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    1:54pm
    Did You like the New Coal Miners Workers Lunch ? :-) :-)
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    8:24pm
    Wonderful post parti. Did you see the Telegraph front page today. The propaganda Murdoch Press in full swing. As you said the truth is nowhere to be seen. Sadly the feeble minded amongst us will not understand.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    8:31pm
    I don't give Him the Pleasure of My money ! I heard it all on the Talk Back Radio today !! We have a Country full of Happy Little Vegemite's !! :-)
    KSS
    15th Jul 2015
    1:38pm
    It is tempting to make a whole series of sweeping statements on this topic, but we all know that such statements will be rebuffed by people leaping in to say their child/grandchild is different, is a special case or that there are a million reasons why their relative actually does reflect the statement but its not their fault.

    However, there are real issues with many of the youth today in relation to the workplace. Apprenticeship enrolments are high (with the promise of high wages at the end - have seem how much a plumber costs these days) but more than 50% fail to complete them. Then there's the uni student who thinks many workplace tasks are too menial for them because they 'have-a-degree', the would-be employee whose Mother makes the enquiries, those who get work then resent being told what to do, those who fail to turn up on time on a daily basis and are continually 'sick', those who publically criticise their employer on social media; and not one of them thinks they have to begin in the ranks and not in Management because they have no work or life experience. And whose 'fault' is this? Mainly the parents who have cossetted and spoiled them during childhood, the school system that promotes no competition in case someone's feelings are hurt if they don't 'win', 'rules' in primary school that say you have to invite the entire class to your child's birthday party not just the child's friends so the kids never have to learn how to handle disappointment. And the examples go on. In the end what these kids are being trained for is a sense that they are the centre of the universe, whatever they want they will get and that they are not responsible for anything. Then comes the real world and they simply can't cope.

    Even in the best jobs in the best workplace with the highest salaries, there will be times when you don't feel like working, or don't like the job or the people (or both), or you could do better/more interesting tasks but guess what, you have to go to work anyway.

    And this is what separates the older worker from many of today's youth. The older worker understands these things, they are reliable, they will do what is required to get the job done and they will still show some kind of loyalty to the employer even today.

    No, many of the youth of today need to take a good hard look in the mirror and adjust their attitude. They will get where they want to go, just not today. Maybe next month or next year when they have actually learned something and proven themselves capable not just "entitled".
    Stoker
    15th Jul 2015
    2:10pm
    Well KSS - that is a good comment as are some of the others, without me going on in my comment, let me say about our grand-daughter, from primary school to high with class mates they all had to have extra maths taught as it was NOT done at primary, then at 14 yrs she got an after school and weekend job at a fast food place, became disgusted at the behaviour of so many young people, at 16 still at college but also now a shift supervisor, then this year to UNI - yahoo - within two weeks the biggest lesson was to Hate Abbott, but then things start to change our daughter noted this change, after 3 months the lass came home from Uni with advise she had quit, will no longer be included in any tripe put out by a Uni and the idiots that have no comprehension of the real world.
    Oh dear sorry folks.
    Mak
    15th Jul 2015
    3:00pm
    KSS, that is exactly 'they way it' is with today's youth, excellent post.
    Oars
    15th Jul 2015
    7:24pm
    You have hit the nail on the head in so many ways KSS. I wonder how many of those beggars we see in India or Bangladesh would cherish the chance to live and work here. I bet they would rise to at least middle management in no time- no need for a "uni" degree for them. The bottom line is that certain Uni degrees are focused on the workplace that the graduates will work. Law, Engineering, Architectrure, Economics, Banking. I wonder how many of the arts degrees can assist a bloke who sells tyres and does wheel alignments- successfully ?
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    8:33pm
    KSS: the best post I have ever read from you. Spot on the money. Employers seriously discriminate against older workers when they should be embracing them. What a waste of talent and life experience/understanding.......but then that is what Australian businesses are happy to do for paying wet behind the ears kids with major attitude problems a low wage. And you wonder why the nation is failing.

    Oars: Art degrees? Thanks for the laugh. I thought Arts degrees were good for nothing except political life and teaching.
    Pass the Ductape
    16th Jul 2015
    9:41am
    Top comment KSS
    niemakawa
    15th Jul 2015
    2:57pm
    Too many people today, especially the young, have inflated egos about themselves. They seem to believe that a university degree is an open door to a job of their liking. In actual fact, University courses, as is the case with general education itself, in Australia have been "dumbed" down, so to speak. Mainly to accommodate the "sensitivities" of those that do not really have the mindset or qualifications to go to University. The push for "equal" opportunity for the masses is in reality a pipe dream and will be the downfall of Australian society as we know it.
    Stoker
    15th Jul 2015
    3:40pm
    Yes! Yes! So many have never left schooling, they do not know how to work, as some one else has said there is no Responsibility, No Respect, and No Discipline - of course many today would interpret my comment 'no discipline' as strap or smack, instead of self control, but, thats how they are brought up today.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    4:02pm
    Strap ? Smack ? You'll Have the Welfare Nazi's onto Ya !! :-)
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    4:06pm
    Try to a little bit more Politically Correct next time ! :-)
    Like..." Don't do that again Darling, or You will only get One Ice Cream instead of Two !! :-)"
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    8:36pm
    So wonderful Frank is not here. Such a civilised non political discussion. ANd yes I agree with the above. Factual! We are sounding like a bunch of old farts guys...and parti. Chuckle......
    Anonymous
    15th Jul 2015
    9:18pm
    mick, THAT'S WHAT IT IS!! I thought this "conversation" sounded a bit more relaxed and that's why. Thank you.
    Radish
    19th Jul 2015
    6:19pm
    Try reasoning with a two year old and see how far you get LOL!
    Mak
    15th Jul 2015
    3:21pm
    One creator of the problem is, Australia no longer has self-sufficient manufacturing, thanks to the clowns who signed the UN Lima Agreement.
    What sort of idiotic situation is it when were told by government ministers that we were helping third-world countries 'get on their feet' which only assisted Australia to commit 'manufacturing suicide'.

    Due to this situation, training young people in trade and other skills sees trained people with a competency certificate discovering that there are very few jobs available in every relevant organisation.

    It does not need rocket science to figure out that Australia is sinking further into a black hole as more manufacturing disappears from our land into Asia, and we have various politicians promising to create more jobs, where when and how, when the public know they haven't even got the brains to mop floors, let alone run Australia which takes leadership skills, serving the public and competence, where the hell is it!
    niemakawa
    15th Jul 2015
    3:26pm
    It is all in political rhetoric! One other problem is Australians are generally complacent when it comes to politics and only become interested at election time when all parties bring out the big "carrot".
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    3:34pm
    I think it has turned into a full term Affair now ! You cant take Your eye off them for one minute ! Or something else will Disappear and a New Perk will pop up on their list....... :-(
    MICK
    15th Jul 2015
    8:43pm
    Mak: I find you post very interesting. Although not involved in politics at the time I remember the media hype about helping third world countries to get on. My immediate thoughts were:
    1. Given that labour rates in the third world are nix how are first world countries going to maintain a fair standard of living. Yes, the selfish option!
    2. What is going to happen to our manufacturing and thereafter the jobs which sustain the nation when you let third world nations in by dropping tariffs.
    3. What will be the effect on our society when all of our factories are closed and we become the new third world?
    4. Will those countries who are now our political masters have pity on us and remember what we did for them or will they crush us.
    So many thoughts. Such nightmares starting to become a reality. God help the grandkids.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    8:56pm
    Don't Cry ! We might GET Foreign Aid ! :-)

    15th Jul 2015
    4:12pm
    I have done a few TAFE courses (auto maintenance, computer basics, and forklift qualifications) which I found very informative, well organised, and easy to follow. From what I have seen of TAFE campuses and curriculum there are a multitude of trades which can be learned (hospitality, IT, bricklaying, etc, etc.) without the need of unwanted university divisional requirements. An education and resulting job are like most things in life - you only get out what you put in.
    particolor
    15th Jul 2015
    4:20pm
    I did the Gem Cutting Course ! Very Handy :-)
    Nan Norma
    15th Jul 2015
    6:02pm
    Try getting a painter. They must be worth their weight in gold.
    bandy
    15th Jul 2015
    7:27pm
    I meet many backpackers in the country where I live,all young people well educated know every thing but cant do a bloody thing.They don't seem to get the importance of learning the basics & then trying for the important things.Just an observance.
    Anonymous
    15th Jul 2015
    9:11pm
    bandy, these sound like pseudo worldly-wise people who have deluded themselves into believing they are beyond the basics, everyone else is wrong, and they can solve all the planet's problems and correct all the earth's errors, when most of them don't have the decency to shower or wear clean clothes. They will always be around, pay them no mind, and enjoy the country air.
    Virginia
    15th Jul 2015
    10:42pm
    Get rid of self checkouts ----- refuse to use them these positions were an ideal environment for our youth to learn work ethics, independence, self esteem , and discipline in the work place.
    Spend a minute in a line save a job. IT STARTS WITH YOU>>
    Don't fill the pockets of big companies and share holders. Give a job to our youth.
    A. N. Onymous
    15th Jul 2015
    11:12pm
    Very good point, Virginia.

    I refuse to use those checkouts. When they first arrived at our Woolies and Coles and one of the staff suggested I go to one, I said, "Since I'll be doing the work, will the price be cheaper in those lanes?"

    She looked stunned as I moved toward the regular checkouts.
    Nan Norma
    17th Jul 2015
    8:13pm
    Love you both. I agree and refuse to use self checkouts. First it was the packing girls, very often high school students, now its serve yourself. Now staff are being stood down or on less hours while the big companies pocked the money saved by us doing the jobs.
    Nan Norma
    17th Jul 2015
    8:13pm
    Love you both. I agree and refuse to use self checkouts. First it was the packing girls, very often high school students, now its serve yourself. Now staff are being stood down or on less hours while the big companies pocked the money saved by us doing the jobs.
    Nan Norma
    17th Jul 2015
    8:13pm
    Love you both. I agree and refuse to use self checkouts. First it was the packing girls, very often high school students, now its serve yourself. Now staff are being stood down or on less hours while the big companies pocked the money saved by us doing the jobs.
    HOLA
    16th Jul 2015
    7:59am
    I remember when my son wanted to leave school in Yr. 10. I said he could, providing he went out and got a decent job, no going on the dole in this household. Well he did go out and look. I told him he had to dress decently and have all his certificates showing his sporting awards, interests and school certificate. Well he came home that evening so happy , one of his mates told him of a Painter who was looking for a couple of apprentices' so he applied and got the job. The Boss told him he was so impressed with a young man looking for a Trade, who actually wore a tie to the interview. Well that was my son, who has worked ever since. He never took a day off work and has great work ethics. His mates from school all went to Uni. and couldn't get work when they graduated. My son has been self employed for twenty years and has all the rewards that hard work brings.
    Pass the Ductape
    16th Jul 2015
    9:48am
    Spot on HOLA. I can remember when the boss I was then working for at the time, was looking for a young fellow to assist me in the job I was doing. After interviewing several likely lads, the one he picked was the only one who had addressed him as SIR!
    particolor
    16th Jul 2015
    10:34am
    What a good choice the Boss made :-) And now all you get is Sir Ductape ? No ? :-)
    HOLA
    17th Jul 2015
    12:18pm
    I must add to my previous comment. My son didn't have a drivers licence and I used to drive him to his work place at 6.am every morning for 12 months until he got his P's. Sometimes it takes dedicated parents to help with their children's future as well. I have no regrets.
    Pass the Ductape
    16th Jul 2015
    9:32am
    it was well understood some time ago that modernising would provide less work and more play for all. Advances in machinery and overall technology would lighten the load or at least remove the drudgery of work for the common man. Well its happened and what has it achieved? A disastrous era of unemployment and hopelessness for those not able to cope with the technical abilities required to survive in this so-called bright new world we've created. And the further we go down this path, the worse it is going to get.
    jackie
    16th Jul 2015
    12:05pm
    I work with young people all are full time students and all are excellent workers. They all travel long distances to work and are not dependant on government handouts. I think young people today are much more intelligent than previous generations because they have a much harder future with less prospective opportunities ahead of them. Instead of having fun they are paying for educational debts while they have to study if they want to get a chance in life. The education system is a con because there aren't enough jobs and more will go to technology.
    Nan Norma
    17th Jul 2015
    8:18pm
    100% It really is hard for a lot of kids today when there is no promise of a job at the end of schooling. What a disapointment that must be.
    HOLA
    8th Aug 2015
    8:50am
    The same thing applies to those students who want to have a career in Music. They are accepted into Universities with a Diploma in Music at the end of it and many students want to play in Symphony Orchestras. Unfortunately these positions only come up when someone moves on to seek their fortune overseas or dies. Have you seen some of the musicians, they are well into their 70's and won't retire.
    peterseaford
    18th Jul 2015
    2:16pm
    what a joke this subject is without including the 457 permit holders and the employers who rip them off by paying less than award rates.
    What fools are we to have let unionism slip away because that was the only way to ensure the minimum conditions were given to workers now who cares.
    Backpackers take jobs from Australians not because they are better workers but because they are unaware of what pay and conditions should apply.
    Read the papers - watch TV - are products cheaper because foreigners work for less?
    The industrialists of our country want unions out because they protected Australian workers and conditions
    So many of us believe this joke of workers cost but the cost is based on what we are prepared to pay.
    Why does it cost so much to attend a private school ? are the teachers paid that much more or is it that seats are restricted and people who can afford to pay will pay.
    Why are there only limited places to study medicine ? Not enough teachers ?


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