Malcolm Turnbull's poll victory

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The latest Fairfax-Ipsos poll suggests that Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull is the most popular new prime minister of the past two decades with new approval ratings higher than those of John Howard, Kevin Rudd, Julia Gilliard and Tony Abbott.

The poll has Malcolm Turnbull with 67 per cent of the preferred Prime Minister vote with Bill Shorten on 21 per cent and uncommitted at 12 per cent. According to the poll, the Coalition has, for the first time since March 2014, regained the lead in the two-party preferred vote with a 53-47 lead.

Approval ratings also bode well for Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull in comparison to his opponent, with 68 per cent of voters approving of the way he is handling his job and just 17 per cent disapproving giving him a net score of 51 per cent. Mr Shorten has scored a net rating of minus 24 per cent with just 32 per cent of voters approving of his job as Opposition Leader and 56 per cent disapproving.

Read more from The Age

Read more from Sydney Morning Herald 

Opinion: Stability a welcome change

While it’s just been a touch over a month since Malcolm Turnbull became Prime Minister, you can already feel a sense of stability that just wasn’t there under the previous leadership.

Voters were asked to rate Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull and Opposition Leader Bill Shorten on aspects like competency, strength as a leader, trustworthiness, and grasp of economic policy. Of the 10 positive attributes, Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull held a significant lead.

Gone is the daily circus we came to expect under the previous leadership. We are left with a prime minister and government that we feel we can trust to lead our country in the right direction.

Prime Minister Turnbull’s honeymoon period will be over after Christmas and his most important challenge heading into the next election will be to deliver a budget that puts Australia on the right path as well as appealing to the voting public.

How do you rate Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s first month in the top job? What are the implications of this poll result for the opposition and its leader, Bill Shorten? 

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Starting out as a week of work experience in 2005 while studying his Bachelor of Business at Swinburne University, Drew has never left his post and has been with the company ever since, working on the websites digital needs. Drew has a passion for all things technology which is only rivalled for his love of all things sport (watching, not playing).
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124 Comments

Total Comments: 124
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    Same LNP govt – lots of talk, no action! Where’s our NBN? Oh, that’s right. Christopher Pyne, the fixer, will get it done.

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      I’ve got my NBN so something has happened.

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      Nothing has happened, Bonny. You’re one of the lucky ones. There’s a heck of a lot of us unlucky ones all over Australia. That’s my annoyance with this federal government – people have push them via Facebook, twitter and other means. And the “media” isn’t doing its job by fawning over Turnbull either. They promised the world and broke most of their promises. It doesn’t matter who the front-man is, most of the LNP MPs are useless.

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      Rosscoe you can make up stories like “They promised the world and broke most of their promises.” But it does not make it a fact. Negative people will always feel hard done by regardless of who the PM is.

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      Rosscoe, that is spot on. I nearly wet myself laughing when you said ‘the fixer’ would deliver my NBN.

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      Pretty spot on Roscoe: different leader, same policies….and still after ordinary Australians. You may have noticed a couple of days ago that this government snuck some legislation through the senate which HIDES the financial affairs of the richest amongst us and multinationals. This government and its big business backers do not want the nation to see how little tax they pay so they changed the law. Transparency? Open debate? We’ll have none of that!!!!!

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      Are you idiots for real? Under the previous system, unless you live in cloud cuckoo land you know that the NBN timetable as promised would never have been delivered on time. It was already 90% behind forecast 2013

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      Exactly right, Sceptic. The most recent report indicated an expectation that the roll out will be complete by 2020. It will be well over budget, but by only a fraction of what the blow out would have been under the original Rudd plan. The most recent prediction for the original plan was for a completion date not before 2025 – if ever.

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      I live 5kms out of the CBD in Perth and it looks like I’ll be lucky to get the NBN by 2109 – and even then, the last km will be copper. What a Liberal farce.

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      NBN: this government fought tooth and nail in opposition to kill the NBN. Well what else is new. Now this government is taking credit for it. Yeah right.
      And let’s not forget that it is going to cost average Australians a fair bit of cash to get it from the node (that could be way down the street) into their home. But business gets it right to the premises. SUch a surprise.
      Keep on with the crap trolls. Nobody believe you.

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      Put this in your browser and you can find out when your NBN is coming
      http://www.mynbn.info/

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      Can’t even find my town in the plan.

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      CowboyJoe
      21st Oct 2015
      1:51pm
      reply
      Yesterday I read a stock recommendation about a company in competition with NBN.

      The report stated the competitive advantage of the company and emphasized that wireless links will win the day and in the near future. Many experts predicted this when pseudo-intellectual, blowtorch Kevin conjured up his deluded version of the digital future.

      NBN and hard wiring are the modern day version of Beta Max

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      We live in a ”black spot” area and won’t get NBN until 2019 or later in all probability. Daughter lives in a prosperous and busy big city suburb and can’t get an Internet connection. I’ve been travelling Oz and have had no phone or Internet at least half the time. Our communications system is absolutely pathetic, and the NBN is an over-priced, outdated concept that should never have been approved. Yes, Cowboy Joe, a Singaporean company is planning to come in and compete, and thank heavens. Maybe they will give us the service Telstra is incapable of delivering. Both political parties made idiots of themselves and sold Australians out by endorsing Telstra as a provider.

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    This is a classic delighted reaction to finally seeing the end of Tony Abbott!!
    I still have a laugh when Tony Abbott was speaking on Ray Hadley’s radio show after he was removed, when he said that “they haven’t changed any policies, so what was that all about”???? Oh dear, we all know what that was all about, all except you!!
    Malcolm Turnbull stuffed up very badly which let Tony Abbott in in the first place, THAT’S how badly he stuffed up. But, let’s give him a go and enjoy the lack of the toxicity that devastated our political debate with Tony Abbott the main culprit.
    Still can’t believe how some people are so upset at losing him.

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      So what has been the change of policy, “Grateful”? Tell me that Turnbull won’t benefit from the stopping of illegal boat arrivals; from the stopping of the deaths at sea; from the scrapping of the mining tax; from the scrapping of the carbon tax; from the signing off of the Free Trade Agreements which Labor had been dithering over for its six years in office; from Abbott’s strong stance against terrorism. Strange indeed that comments made by Abbott were ridiculed by Fairfax and the ABC but are now hailed as “about time” and “appropriate” when spoken by the head of the Parramatta Mosque.

      Where else but the ABC, the Fairfax Press and the ALP would a lifesaver be ridiculed for wearing the uniform of lifesavers everywhere? Where else but the ABC, Fairfax and the ALP would a man who devoted much of his free time to saving lives and homes in bushfire periods be accused of posing for photo opportunities? Where else but the ABC, Fairfax and the ALP would a devoted family man, much loved by his wife, daughters and sisters and who engages in fund-raising activities to support a Women’s Refuge be deemed a misogynist? Meanwhile those same hypocritical critics hail as one of their heroes a man who was a womaniser, who cheated on his wife and who employed a stripper to appear at his 80th birthday party.

      Grateful, you ask that we give Turnbull a go – something which the ABC, Fairfax and the likes of you never gave to Abbott. This is the same Turnbull who caused much of the instability over the past two years by his constant leaks from the cabinet room and his lack of public support for Abbott. If I were fighting in the trenches I would want Abbott watching my back, not Turnbull.

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      The morning after Abbott was dumped it almost felt like there’d been a change of government. What a relief to see him gone

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      Luchar
      You missed one. Where else would a supposed misogynist be harangued relentlessly but then incredulously loses his job substantially due to his unreasonable and persistent support for his female head of staff?

      Why the ABC, SMH and the Green Coalition, that’s where else.

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      Yes Strummer “feelings” feel so good.

      It is also very efficient because one doesn’t have to expend time and thought to logically reach a conclusion. The Age of Aquarius has been here for some time, I feel it.

      A female co-worker once told me that females excel at creating reality with words and men describe reality with words, but what confuses matters is that some men think like women.

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    I really wonder whether a rich man from the world of big business can have empathy with Australian society. Do we want someone who worked for GoldmanSachs to lead our nation – a nation that used to value a fair go and Jack is as good as his master. Have we lost that spirit?
    I dunno, honestly.

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      So, I take it from what you say is that the male person Bill Shorton is a better person (note not a man) a person that has ripped off his union workers ripped off the employers.

      Please spare us the stupidity of envy, OK so maybe MT will not be a good PM but at least his world wise experience gives a wider view.

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      @Stoker. Your accusations – that Bill Shorten “ripped off his union workers [and] … the employers” – is defamatory. Please provide solid evidence that Shorten is guilty of these things.

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      Drpolymath you can hear it for yourself and form your own opinion.

      http://www.commcast.com.au/turc

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      What a strange construction on what constitutes Australian society. Suggest, Batara, that you pick up a grade one book on Australian demographics. Malcolm is as Australian as anyone else born here OR anyone who who has chosen to have their children born here. He is a genuine, intelligent leader. There hasn’t been a real leader as PM for many a long year. Only Malcolm’s seething coalition of self-interested idiots will threaten that – not who Malcolm worked for.

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      Batara so you would condemn Mr Turnbull for working at Goldman Sacs between 1997 and 2001. And he stands doubly condemned in your eyes for being rich. Wow!

      A little research would show that Mr Turnbull comes from a very modest background, raised an only child by his father after his mother left. He went to the local public primary school then Sydney Grammar under a scholarship. He studied law at Sydney Uni whilst working part-time as a TV, radio and print journalist. He was a Rhodes Scholar studying law again at Oxford Uni, became a high profile Barrister, invested in Ozemail the first internet service provider (and made a lot of money,) became an investment banker with former NSW premier Neville Wran and Gough Whitlam’s son, Nicholas. Made a success of that too and all before joining Goldman Sacs.

      I’d say Mr Turnbull was a successful self-made man with an appreciation of what a good education and hard work can do and the foresight to identify opportunity and act on it.

      We can only hope he can do the same on a national level for Australia. Time will tell.

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      That can’t Batara. But then THEY DO NOT CARE and that is the greater tragedy.

      KSS: here we go again! Nobody condemns people who do well. But you would have noticed the other day that Turnbull was being called out not for being wealthy but rather for stashing his money in a known Tax Haven (the Cayman Islands). So how do you think average Australians feel who do not have access to the full gamut of tax deductions and tax shelters that Turnbull and other rich Australians use? It is plain unfair, and Turnbull is now our PM.
      For what it is worth KSS Goldman Sachs has a reputation for being a market manipulator. If it were you and I we would be thrown into prison. But Goldman and other mega banks manipulate the gold and silver price and many have been caught out manipulating currency in the last 2 years. Please do not tell me about Goldman Sachs. I imagine Turnbull would have also had some pretty good insider information whilst at Goldman and his success, whilst fortunate, may have come by other than honest investing. Who would ever know.
      Before you sing the praises of any business you need to establish the reputation of that business.

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      Mick Mr Turnbull worked at Goldman Sacs for 4 years all but 15 years ago. And they were not a regular bank at that time but an investment bank. God help all of us if we are to be continually judged for where we worked in the distant past. And by the way, please point out exactly where I sing the praises of Goldman Sacs or any other business for that matter.

      As for his use of the Cayman Islands, Mr Turnbull is not doing anything illegal or any different to what others in the LABOR party are also doing. A bit ‘rich’ the pot calling the kettle black’ don’t you think?

      No the criticism of Mr Turnbull on this account is simply that he has amassed a goodly sum through his astute business sense and recognition of and action on opportunity. I don’t hear many voices when it comes to promoting the $500,000 he gives to charity each year.

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      Gathering large amounts of personal wealth is no guarantee whatsoever that a person will make a good PM. That’s like comparing apples to oranges.
      What we need is statesmen and stateswomen who have vision, and firm plans for what will be good for all Australians in 20 and 50 yrs time – and an ability to weld together a diverse team, so that the end result is a united effort.
      Unfortunately, the Liberals and those from the corporate sector have an excellent track record of being devious, being devoid of ethics and morals, looking after business mates, and making political decisions that only benefit rich supporters of the Liberal Party.
      I have yet to see whether Malcolm Turnbull is made of the right stuff – but the next year, and the 2016 Turnbull Budget, will soon show whether he is.

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      KSS: Goldman may not have become an investment bank until later but it was operating as a trader in currency and gold markets from 1981. These are where the bank manipulated markets. It is well known for manipulating the gold price…with the blessing of the US government and Federal Reserve from what I understand as neither did anything to indict Goldman. The matter of the crooked selling of sub-prime mortgage products takes us closer to 2007 but to my understanding the track record of the company was already well established by that time. Please let me know if your information is different to this and if so where you came upon this as the above appears to be the facts.
      I believe Turnbull fits in around the time he worked there.

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    I was an unashamed Abbott supporter with my principal criticism of his leadership being that he tried to be all things to all people and that will always be futile. In particular he refused to acknowledge the Muslim problem in real terms as the majority of the electorate is doing.
    Then along comes Malcolm, a pleasant enough chap with a lot going for him in the commercial field but it appears that he is going to be even more appeasing to the Islamic ratbags than Abbott was. He perhaps should be reminded that he is Prime Minister of Australia, a sovereign nation beholden to nobody, and not the Australian Ambassador to Saudi Arabia and environs.
    That said, only time will tell what sort of a leader he will be but, in my opinion, our greatest lack as a nation is an effective opposition who, let it not be forgotten, presents as an alternative Government. I could go on naming names but I’m sure you are all well enough aware of the pathetic rabble that constitutes the Labor frontbench. Perhaps the only bright spot on that horizon is that we will likely be rid of Bill Shorten when the Royal Commission into union malfeasance hands down its verdict.

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      Paddles, I too would have liked to see Abbott stay on as PM. To my mind he was trying to do the right thing by all Australians and politically you cannot do that without upsetting a lot of people. It only takes a small percentage from each demographic to defect and start believing the vile personal attacks from the ABC and Unfairfax.
      When is Shorten appearing at the TURC? I heard it was sometime this week?

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      Paddles: if you thought that Abbott was ok then you did not look closely at the large number of outright lies he told to get votes….with his actions on attaining office there for all to see. Oh yes, he did stop the votes. This is the only tick he will ever get from me.

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      Did I say “stop the votes”. Cracking myself up here………….

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      mick, you can claim to be equally contemptuous of both Labor and the Liberal leaders, but your criticism and accusations against Abbotts “untruthfulness” as PM are not balanced by similar criticism of Abbott’s Labor predecessors. Remember Kevin Rudd claiming to be an economic conservative before sending Australia on the road to debt after squandering Costello’s surplus? Or Julia Gillard’s “No Carbon Tax”?

      So if you want to claim to be without political bias, don’t just claim to be so, demonstrate it.

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      Yes well said Wally. mick you have no credibility because you have persisted with that outright lie. OK, maybe I am being a little harsh? You may not even realise you are a Labor boy.

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      Mick, can I assume that if I go back through your posts during the Gillard years, I will find constant references criticising her “No carbon tax under the government I lead” lie? Where Abbott made a major mistake was in his “no new taxes” promise. This was a promise he never had to make, because he was going to win government anyway. Further, on taking office he did not go hard enough against Bowen when it was found that Bowen’s announced $18 billion budget deficit was actually a $48 billion deficit. Abbott’s lack of skills as a politician cost him dearly.

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      wally: GILLARD LIED. Alan Jones used to tell us that repeatedly. I have not heard Jones once mention anything the MANY lies Abbott told.
      Rudd’s debt funding: GFC wally. Tell me if any of your family lost their jobs whilst you denounce Rudd’s waste of money. Damned if you do and damned if you don’t methinks!
      Carbon Tax: a lie yes but a good good policy which WAS WORKING WELL. As late as last week Christine Legard called for the need for countries to introduce a Carbon Tax so that Emissions Trading Schemes could not be corrupted.
      You need to look at the issues in context wally. I do hate both sides of politics mate and only defend Labor because of those who unfairly attack the last 2 governments whilst refusing to consider the turbulent times in which they ruled and the good things which were achieved. You have to be objective and fair lest one becomes a Frank style troll trotting out the 3 words slogans to get a hit.

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      Mick, you talk about “the MANY lies Abbott told.” We know about the “no new taxes” he foolishly and needlessly promised. But perhaps you could list the rest of the MANY (your emphasis) lies. You also speak about “the good things which were achieved” under the two ;labor governments. Perhaps you could also make a list of these “good things” for us – and please don’t list the GFC which every serious economist agrees to have been a gross over-spending of what was needed to do the job.

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    i preferred MT to Abbot,but there is still a built in ARROGANCE in this gov,t and the public servants who are there to serve us.Not much really different.

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      I strongly suspect most people’s response to most political events is largely determined by confirmation bias, eg whether one is right or left wing, basically. So there’s really not very much to be gained by asserting this person is a union hack or that person is a tax cheat but hopefully some of us can rise above partisan politics and just try to assess who is a good person to represent us in parliament, to be our Prime Minister, to impact the kind of place Australia is. So guess which side of politics I support (mainly) – I happen to think the ascent of our new PM is the best thing that’s happened in Australian politics for quite a while. Hopefully now we can have a little more civility and stability within the coalition and also the federal parliament. Fingers crossed!

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      I think that what is needed Ferny is for us all to assess the honesty, or in the case of Tony Abbott his dishonesty, and the actions taken to benefit the nation. This government has totally failed the honesty test and its actions are nothing more than to move money out of the bank accounts of average citizens and into the bank accounts of the wealthy. I fail to understand that people who are staunch supporters of the LNP cannot see the game plan.

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      Whatever the arrogance of this government is, it pales in comparison to the arrogance of the top bureaucrats in both state and federal government agencies. What a great job they have. No accountability, able to exercise ones personal bias whenever the opportunity arises, feign disbelief when criticized and then go back work the next day at their very highly paid position. In the rare occasion when they do suffer a consequence they are typically promoted to a higher paid position somewhere else in the bowel of the machine that really runs this country.

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    O come off it. He’s been in a month. Most people haven’t even noticed that he has ticked Abbott’s policies, most of them, and is very cautious about changing anything; probably because the Cabinet wont let him. ‘He has also been foolish enough to leave the evil Dutton in place, and now is facing huge embarrassment at least, for the potato-head’s dreadful treatment of the raped girl. Sorry, but I don’t believe in stability as long as the LNP is warming the governmental seats.

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    Brilliant new rhetoric from Malcolm – finally a Statesman is at the helm – he would make a great leader of the Labor Party.
    But, while the pit-bull Scot Morrison is yapping away in the wings, thinking he IS the Prime Minister, there will always be instability.

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      I’m afraid that Turnbull wasn’t prepared to do the work to be a Labor PM. Too used to the easy life!

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      Rosscoe, what is ‘work’?

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      Turnbull does not have a union background, does not have a hatred for business, and applauds those who have a go. Not suited for Labor Rosscoe.

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      Scrivener: whilst I have few issues with Turnbull I do have issue with the policies of this government. When you follow the money trail it always ends at the bank accounts of the rich.
      You have no basis for your comment and whether Labor or Liberal your assessment should remain with whether or not the PM and his parliament is acting in the nation’s interest. THAT IS ALL THAT DOES MATTER!

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      Frank and Scrivener – Turnbull asked former ALP senator Graham Richardson how to gain preselection in the ALP. When Turnbull found out that he would have to do a bit of work, eg talk to real workers (the ordinary Australians who actually produce services and assets for Australia ) , he decided that it wasn’t worth the effort. Yeah, we need people like Turnbull to tell us how to run our lives. In your dreams!

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      Rosscoe if you can bring yourself to listen/watch the TURC you will learn 2 things about your beloved Labor Party.
      1. Every man woman and their dogs have been courted by Labor.
      2. Turnbull is too diplomatic to give the real reason. I suspect it is the corruption that didn’t sit well. But let’s allow Richo to make some political ground on it.

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      Roscoe: you can easily tell the LNP trolls on this site. They are the ones who repeatedly shout “TURC” and “Labor” crap. No substance. Just propaganda. The 3 word Abbott slogan methodology. Not worth the time of day!

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    Under Abbott the Lliberals seemed to forget what the word Liberal actually meant and opted to charge down the ultra conservative path. Abbott thought he could black out media reporting and scream that the sky was falling and everyone would go along with him.
    Abbott ignored science and had little Technological vision for this country. Australia has to go beyond this dig it up and cart it away mentality and hopefully under Turnbull we can have a country with a more balanced governance while maintaining a social conscience and life line for those who are truly struggling through no fault of their own. We sadly lack leaders with nous and charisma and the ability to conciliate and compromise so hopefully in Turnbull we will have a long and stable leadership so we can get this Country to be more than a giant sand pit and quarry. Guess time will tell. It seems strange that Turnbull’s worst enemies are within his own party though.

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      Abbott came to office through coal money and Rupert Murdoch propaganda. Of course he had no interest in technology. Only dirty energy which was going to see Australia as the last man standing in a world which understands that we have to change. At least Turnbull has a track record of understanding. That is why he got the boot and Abbott took his place. It will be interesting from here on in though.

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      Abbott got a free ride into power through Labors power hungry factions public squabbling. They should have stuck with Gillard regardless and not gone back to Rudd. They forgot to focus on all the good work Gillard was actually doing and the amount of legislation she was getting through by consensus and compromise. with a minority Government. something Abbott could never do.Already seeing a bit of an about face with some LNP Ministers. Josh Freyberg for one. it’s embarrassing to see Ministers of both persuasions do a complete turn around in rhetoric depending on which way the wind blows. Now all of a sudden Freyberg is an advocate for renewable energy . waiting for them to start telling everyone about man made climate change and how we now need to listen to science.

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      Good to see you guys thinking logically about these issues.

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      Maybe some things haven’t changed. How com the big hole in Queensland is going ahead even after our own banks are withdrawing from funding it.

      Come on Malcolm. You are the businessman why is this happening.

      Even though we don’t think much of our banks they are not that stupid and know when to get out.

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      Mangomick, just wondering where Abbott’s “free ride” came from. Abbott came to the job because Turnbull was making no inroads into a Rudd government which was rapidly sending the country broke. It was Abbott who caused the demise of Rudd and led to Gillard’s rise. Of the following election, as one journalist wrote, “Abbott won the election but lost the negotiation.”

      Gillard’s “consensus and compromise” consisted of signing an agreement with the Greens which cost the country dearly, gaining the support of two renegade independents, who represented two of the most conservative electorates in NSW, but whose prime concern was the security of their own jobs, (and neither of whom even bothered nominating for the following election for obvious reasons), by backing the disgraced Thomson and by courting the obnoxious Peter Slipper. Let us never forget that Gillard’s “misogynist speech” against Abbott was in fact a speech defending the despicable Slipper.

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      The majority of Australian voters have never had a liking of Abbott. He took over Liberal Power from Turnbull by one vote but was never going to win the hearts of the Australian voters. It was only because Labor was sent a very loud message by the voters of Australia that their factional in fighting and back stabbing would not be tolerated, that Abbott got the top job. If Crusty the clown had been leading the LNP at the time he also could have been Prime Minister. As Abbotts honeymoon period wore off more and more Australians and LNP Ministers apparently, came to realise that Abbott was wrong for the job. Just as Gillard had to make compromises with Greens and independents so to could Abbott particularly in the Senate, but he lacked those basic skills as well. Turnbull will fill those deficiencies. Abbott forgot he had to rule for all Australians not just the select few. Turnbull understands that. You only had to look at Abbotts gloating while Bronwyn Bishop run roughshod as speaker with her blatant bias. No fair minded Australian accepts that kind of behaviour. Compare Turnbull’s quiet but polite put down of Shorten, with his jibe about taxi drivers and cleaners ,while defending himself on his wealth, to Abbotts snide bully boy tactics during similar question times.

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      mango: fair enough, but don’t forget that Abbott did not get there on his own. First the Murdoch publications ran anti Labor propaganda for a couple of years. Second the other big media players in Oz (7 and 9 networks) did the same and even refused to run a PAID GetUp advertisement. How does that work? Last of all were the mining industry (predominantly the coal industry) running anti Labor adds. And to top it off off you got the constant attacks on Labor from 7 and 9 whilst ignoring ABbott’s travel rorts….which for all intents and purposes the same as Slipper but were simply ignored. And of course lets not ignore the court attacks on Gillard which is the same stunt we are seeing again with Shorten. In the end Gillard never had a case to answer and walked free…after the political intentions had been achieved.
      I am sort of a ‘fairness’ sort of guy and hate both corruption and the unfair singling out of one person or group for no other reason than dishonest intent. Sort of helps to explain why I defend Labor when I do not want a bar of the Party. Frank the troll would never understand!

      Wstaton: good call. Guess what……….THIS GOVERNMENT IS OWNED BY THE COAL INDUSTRY. Funny how Adani is apparently going ahead when all of our big banks have said no to funding. Lets see where the funds come from. Hope it is not from the coal industry of the current government or I’ll be out on the streets calling for blood…as will many other Australians.
      Like you Wstaton I do not want to see the reef die for a coal industry which in much less than 100 years will be dead. Just imagine the tourism potential which could still be happening then.
      Enough to turn a bloke to drink. Where’s particolor? Anybody know if parti is ok?

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      Can’t see the sense in allowing Adani to go ahead at this point of time when many mines are down sizing and going into maintenance mode. Better off leaving the coal in the ground for now and maintaining a strategic reserve for future generations than allow it to be sold cheap. Strange that Josh Frydenberg would just shrug off Queensland Treasury assessment that the mine at current prices would be financially unviable. Environment Department have a lot to answer for in allowing mines to dump high p.h level tail water into river systems particularly after heavy rain events .The Fitzroy river system in particular supplies water to many towns including Rockhampton and salt content now higher than it should be and yet that is virtually being swept under the carpet.

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    Turnbull is a patrician, a man for the people but not of the people, and there’s nothing intrinsically wrong with that.

    That Abbott can see no difference between the government under his leadership and under Turnbull, speaks volumes for his lack of understanding as to what the Australian public wants from a Prime Minister – vision, respect, engaged not spoken down to, for policies and their need to be explained, optimism, positivity and to behave and sound like a statesman not a street fighter!

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      Good observation.

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      The Australian voting public are no longer “One Party” animals for life. More and more are swing voters looking for Leadership and at Policy. The Party that understands that will be the Party that leads for the longest. Many are prepared to make sacrifices for the good of the Country but not for the good of the few.

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      I appreciate your view Ronin and of course you are dead right. But the proof of the pudding is in the eating so let’s see where one M. Turnbull sends the cash. If it continues to head to the rich with the same Abbott policies then there can be no difference between the two. Time will tell.

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    Malcolm T only looks good because Shorten is so incredibly bad.

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      I don’t think Shorten is bad. He’s simply outclassed. I don’t think Shorten can match it with Turnbull, but I think politically he can on a policy level. It will depend heavily on whether MT can resist the IPA and the various economically powerful lobby groups, such as the coal lobby.

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      And that Shorten policy is what mick?

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      Shorten has already fired his main policy. The Cayman Is business. It has taken a few weeks to formulate that one?

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      Ain’t that the truth Shalshooli. It will however be interesting to find out if Tunbull is paying the right amount of tax or if his Cayman Islands accounts are to dodge AUstralian tax. After all the Cayman Islands are a known tax haven and Turnbull is not parking his money there for the fun of it.
      But given that THIS GOVERNMENT has snuck a bill through the senate in the past couple of days to hide the business dealings of the rich and famous perhaps we will never know. So why do you think that a Turnbull led government wants to hide this?

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      Plenty of truth to your comment.

      But, now that the privately and publicly funded self-appointed propagandists and influence peddlers (AKA journalists) have achieved their goal we will experience a normalizing stage.

      The next stage will be to tear down Malcolm prior to the election.

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