New research shows that one in two Australians live payday to payday

One in two Australians live payday to payday, with unrealistic expectations of retirement.

According to research by National Australia Bank (NAB) and MLC, almost half of all working Australians are living from payday to payday and have unrealistic expectations about retirement.

The Australia Today report shows that around 48 per cent of the 2000 people surveyed believe they’ll only need $150,000 for a comfortable retirement. The majority of survey participants also feel that having $1 million set aside for retirement doesn’t necessarily mean a person is rich.

As the Federal Government approaches an election later this year, changes to the superannuation system and to the Age Pension remain a hot topic.

And whilst discussing these changes is a dilemma for the Government, it seems to be even more confusing for most Australians.

The NAB/MLC research was commissioned in the hope that some of this confusion could be dispelled, making for a better informed debate about the future of the superannuation system.

“With almost one in two Australians saying they are living ‘pay cheque to pay cheque’, we’ve got to ask ourselves if we’ve got the settings right to achieve that aim,” said MLC Chief Executive Andrew Hagger. “But in order to have a well informed national conversation about our super system, we need to understand how Australians identify themselves and discover their aspirations. 

Interestingly, many wealthy Australians actually believe they are in the middle class, many of those feel they fall into an even lower class bracket.

One of the most significant findings of the study, was how people define a “comfortable lifestyle”. Around 75 per cent of respondents agreed that a comfortable lifestyle means “having enough money to do what I want, when I want”, but 46 per cent of those surveyed are living pay cheque to pay cheque to fund it, leaving very little for retirement savings.

With the average household earning $77,676 annually, the research suggests there is a “clear disconnect between the definition of lifestyle and standards of living”.

“While we have changed our spending patterns, have we also changed our savings patterns? Is the current super system helping Australians achieve the standard of living they aspire to in retirement?” said Mr Hagger. 

“Super is a long-term product that needs stable policy,” he said. “The stakes are high. When we get super right, it helps Australians in retirement and helps our economy. When we get it wrong, we risk our future prosperity.”

“We do believe a key priority should be to establish a clear objective for our super system – one that all future reforms can be focused on supporting.”

Read the Australia Today report
Read more at www.abc.net.au

Are you living payday to payday? Do you think that knowing which class bracket you fall into really makes a difference as to how the Government should create future policy? Do you feel confident that you are financially prepared for retirement?

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    COMMENTS

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    PIXAPD
    18th Feb 2016
    10:00am
    Maybe if they didn't use credit, if they owed nothing, if they were not a slave to the banks, then they would have savings.
    tia-maria
    18th Feb 2016
    11:16am
    PIXAPD...............look its about living from fortnight to another.........nothing about credit cards.......
    wally
    18th Feb 2016
    11:44am
    Everybody's circumstances are different and there is no one size fits all solution to that. Some people have to spend lots of money on medicine and medical treatment while others are healthy enough to avoid these expenses. The same gees for the cost of housing and lifestyle choices.

    The pension, in a perfect world, should be enough to cover fortnightly expenses so that recourse to credit cards should not be necessary. Unfortunately appliances break down and need replacing. Family visits at Christmas may involve travel and the cost of presents can have the "plastic" come out and get a workout to cover these costs and add to a pensioner's financial burdens.

    Lastly, some people are smarter with their money (and what they spend it on ) than others. So even the best intentions of the Nanny State cannot save us all from ourselves.
    MICK
    18th Feb 2016
    11:44am
    Whilst circumstances vary many many older Australians did without heaps of things other people took for granted.
    Being debt free is attainable but rarely happens for people who want the good life.
    Australians these days expect to spend everything they earn. Their problem. Results almost unavoidable.
    melbgirl
    18th Feb 2016
    12:35pm
    As a young widow raising 4 kids, paying almost half my full time wages in rent means I have always had to live week to week. Medical issues now mean I no longer work, rent is 2/3 of pension - savings, holidays etc are all a pipe dream. The cost of a roof over your head leaves nothing for anything else whether you are a tenant or young person being their first home. Been on public housing list for years, recently told its a 20 year wait. Pensioners fully owning their own home don't have any idea what it is like for us tenants; expensive and insecure housing mean constant stress.
    particolor
    18th Feb 2016
    8:30pm
    Well isn't Life a Bowl of Cherry's for You !! I hope You owe at least 80 Grand on Your Credit Card !! :-) :-)
    ex PS
    19th Feb 2016
    10:16am
    mick, not all debt is bad. The problem is people don't seem to be able to manage it. I was 40 before I had a new car because I was intent on paying off my mortgage. I never did without anything I needed, but I missed out on plenty of things I wanted. Not getting everything I wanted did not do me any long term harm, but paying off our home increased our standard of living expodentially.
    It hasn't changed much in centuries, all you have to do is prioritise, if you can;t afford to change cars every three years don't do it, can't afford to eat out once a week don't eat out etc. etc.
    I aknowledge the people who due to economic circumstances can't get ahead of the game, but most of the people that I come arss who bleat about not having enough money are wasting it on items that they do not really need and in some cases don't use wonce they have them. How many expensive 4X4's are out there that have never been off road, how many houses have built in theatre rooms that never get used?
    buby
    19th Feb 2016
    1:17pm
    YEs ex PS
    I did have a morgage to pay once, but the husband didn't want too, so you have many situations, where life can kick u in the gut.
    Then leave you Like Melbgirl living it tough in rental land, where the landlords then screw you over as well, and rip money off you where ever possible.
    So life can deal you some dirty deals alright.
    So it really sucks when the Pollies do that do ya too.
    I"M OVER IT
    Anonymous
    21st Feb 2016
    8:09am
    Pixapd, your arrogance is matched only by your ignorance.

    I went into debt to buy a house, because if I hadn't, I'd have been crippled with ever-increasing rents for the rest of my life.

    I went into debt to pay for medical care and special-education needs for a special-needs child. Five modest houses worth of debt, actually.

    I went into debt to buy into a business when my partner had an accident and could no longer work and I needed a decent income to support and educate my kids, but being an underprivileged orphan who started work at 14, I had no qualifications to get a job that paid a decent wage.

    I went into debt to continue building that business, forfeiting personal income from it to reinvest. That would have been a good thing to do if a government bureaucrat hadn't lied and conspired with a crooked solicitor to destroy the business so they could steal the intellectual property.

    I never once incurred debt for a consumer item I could reasonably do without. Went 25 years without a holiday of any kind (try going that long without a break while working AND caring for a special needs child and a disabled partner!). Had 5 dinners out in that entire time. Between partner and I, made evey stitch of clothing the family wore and most of the furniture, built our home (living in a shed for 5 years with 3 young kids), renovated old bomb cars, and grew vegetables.

    And now I'm being screwed by a stinking government for having managed to save a little while enduring all that hardship.

    How dare you ''holier than thou'' priviledged presume to pass judgment on others just because you were lucky enough to not face those challenges?

    Frankly, if I had my time over, I'd live it up on a credit card and then declare bankruptcy and claim the full aged pension.
    Glen48
    18th Feb 2016
    10:40am
    60 Minutes are claiming on their show this Sunday house prices will drop 50% so be some bargains around plus a drop tends to over shoot so maybe 60%???
    buby
    19th Feb 2016
    1:25pm
    Its all entirely Possible Glen.
    a REcession is coming i believe, because there are NO jobs.
    How are the ppl going to pay off their morgages???
    YOU know its a frighten situation
    PIXAPD
    18th Feb 2016
    10:42am
    If the ASX crashed and another great depression houses will be sold for a song.... $10,000 - $20,000...be bargain.
    Glen48
    18th Feb 2016
    10:48am
    Yes will affect the ASX as well any companies mixed up in R E..Townsville must be in trouble by now after Clive's business tanking
    Every 80 yrs there has been a depression last one 1930,,but any thing could happen ,,wake up one morning and find Xk in your bank account.
    MICK
    18th Feb 2016
    11:26am
    And anybody with onshore money to buy would have their funds frozen. Or worse. Cyprus?
    HarrysOpinion
    18th Feb 2016
    12:42pm
    Don't fret...the government will rip that of you as well...
    Ritza
    18th Feb 2016
    10:58am
    There were women I worked with who refused to pay super as they were married and "did not need it"
    Of course they have the BIG house and 2 children and two cars and have a very large loan. They also have the biannual foreign holiday.
    I know I sound envious but I have struggled to pay off my home ( through 17% interest )
    and on my small super pension I pay all my bills and enjoy life
    ( of course that was before Mr Morrison kicked me with all his plans to make us pay pay pay now that I am too old to work )

    But life is good here ...good neighbours, good friends, a roof over my head and no bombs going off... and Salim M losing out on that property.... yes a good day
    Mygasheater
    18th Feb 2016
    7:52pm
    The Superannuation Guarentee Act introduced employer paid super in 1992. It was not a choice to have super or not, so I'm not sure how you work mates could opt not to have it after 1992.
    buby
    19th Feb 2016
    1:29pm
    Ritza you probably have some super money laying around in vain. Try to find it, you might as well make use of it, cause if you don't the Gov. will take it back thats for sure.
    PIXAPD
    18th Feb 2016
    11:08am
    Christian folks are to OWE NOTHING, we have no debts, we are not slaves to the lenders, but alas many disobey, they owe and to them it means woe.
    tia-maria
    18th Feb 2016
    11:18am
    WHAT ???????????
    PIXAPD
    18th Feb 2016
    11:22am
    Seems I need repeat it for clarity >>>>>Christian folks are to OWE NOTHING, we have no debts, we are not slaves to the lenders, but alas many disobey, they owe and to them it means woe.
    MICK
    18th Feb 2016
    11:24am
    We all had to go into debt for our house. And then many people did really well by buying rental property. Too much debt or 'bad' debt (self indulgence!) are gambling. If things go wrong then nobody to blame but number 1.
    Anonymous
    21st Feb 2016
    7:57am
    Christian folks don't always have a choice, Pixapd. Perhaps I was ''evil'' borrowing money to pay for essential medical care and special education for my disabled daughter? Or was I ''evil'' having a special child in the first place, huh?

    What I think was ''evil'' is that society doesn't ensure that families whose lives were turned upside down by the need to sacrifice everything to help a special child overcome their difficulties are helped financially so they don't have to incur crippling debt. Oh, but I could have just put her into State care. A doctor recommended that, actually. Told me that would be the end of my worries. I could get on with my life. She'd be a vegetable today, instead of a taxpaying school teacher, wife and mother. But I'd have lived free of debt and be a ''self-funded retiree'', and I wouldn't be suffering the curse of being branded a ''welfare recipient'' (read ''third class citizen, looked down on and declared to have no right to comfort in old age).

    I get very tired of the arrogant ''holier-than-though'' egotists on this site who have no idea about life outside their cosy little environment.
    MICK
    18th Feb 2016
    11:33am
    The rich deserve what they have if they have paid their allotted taxes. Whilst I have nothing against people who have done well having the best of retirements I do Most do not. I draw the line when people accumulate huge sums of money by avoiding paying their fair share as well as the big end of town self admiration society complete with loopholes not meant for anybody else.
    Any survey which unveils the facts should not come as a surprise. The other end of town is good at this game.
    Mygasheater
    18th Feb 2016
    8:02pm
    But the super rich shouldn't have to pay tax. These are the people who ensure pathetic wage earners have jobs.

    Anyone with real initiative can go on to make millions and become super rich. If lazy bogans choose to fail at school, fail to get a well paying job, fail to marry a rich wife, they have no one but themselves to blame.

    After all, we all start from exactly the same place, with the same kind of parents, go to the same school, have the same opportunities for work and in life generally.

    BUT the bogans, the leaners, the losers CHOOSE failure just so they can rort the welfare system. As Centrelink benefits pay soooooooo well.

    Yeah, in your dreams.
    Tom Tank
    18th Feb 2016
    11:34am
    We live in an era of mad consumerism driven by business advertising getting people to buy things they want but don't need.
    The problem we oldies have is that the spending up big generation were brought up by our generation.
    The concept of putting a little by for a rainy day is unheard of today. We have been assured by politicians, as well as business, as to how well off we are so spend spend.
    There will be a day of reckoning and it may not be too far off and then we will all pay the price. I hate to say it again but it all driven by Capitalism and greed and the need for constant growth.
    HarrysOpinion
    18th Feb 2016
    1:19pm
    Not Capitalism Tom Tank but, ULTRA-CAPITALISM. If you google Age Pensioners on Internet there's an array of commissioned reports that stigmatise Age Pensioners almost to the point of inferring that the baby boomer Aged Pensioner with some wealth is the scum-of-this earth, worst than a Refugee. So now, after the governments of present and past have wasted the accumulated Treasury revenues and have got themselves in to deeper debt, the wealthy Aged Pensioner must be punished for being innovative, for their wise investments in r/e that helped the building industry stay afloat, for creating housing that not so wealthy could rent, for contributing a greater share of their taxable income to Medicare or Private Health and contributing to the greater prosperity of mining, manufacturing, retail industries and for being employers in Australia. Yes siree! Let's rip them off but just to make it fair let's rip off every Aged Pensioner in Australia after all the baby boomers contributed sweet fa to Australia's economy and Treasury compared to what today's generation is contributing. It's the entire baby boomers fault, the scum-of-this earth. How dare do they live so long, become wealthy and welch on part pension or full pension? .... I was just interrupted by my 9-year-old grand daughter who asked, " If the government takes possession of all the homes that Aged Pensioners own...grand dad how will you be able to afford a Nursing Home?".........(silence).
    PIXAPD
    18th Feb 2016
    11:37am
    The truth is....the rich rule over the poor and the borrower is slave to the lender
    Glen48
    18th Feb 2016
    11:46am
    Ever one is a renter you rent from the l.lord or the bank Like ants we are set up to pay interest all our lives....die then our kids take over living in debt..
    MICK
    18th Feb 2016
    11:46am
    True. But some people escape.
    PIXAPD
    18th Feb 2016
    11:51am
    The faithful servant RECEIVETH interest... according to the parable, they do NOT [pay interest, they are the head and not the tail
    Golfer
    18th Feb 2016
    1:10pm
    PIXAPD, isn't the faithful servant the TAIL
    Patriot
    18th Feb 2016
    7:05pm
    PIXAPD
    Does not have to be so though!
    Look at Iceland & Hungary.
    Iceland "Jailed" their Banksters and Hungary has just evicted the Rothshield banksters & IMF!

    These countries have Politicians with "B*lls" though who are serving their constituents rather than the "International Money Masters".
    Anonymous
    21st Feb 2016
    7:47am
    In this country, today, the faithful servant definitely DOES NOT receiveth the interest, Pixapd. The faithful servant gets shafted to give the interest to the bludger, the cheat, the fraudster, the spendthrift, and the greedy rich tax evader.
    particolor
    21st Feb 2016
    11:13pm
    Solution ... STOP BEING HONEST ! It's Trending in Canberra ! :-)

    18th Feb 2016
    11:57am
    I think the research proves conclusively that too many of the younger generation have absurd expectations of lifestyle and don't appreciate the hardship their oldies endured or the effort and sacrifice that went in to accumulating their retirement savings. No wonder the young want to strip retirees of everything! They see us living comfortably because we worked, saved, and learned how to go without, and they can't live ''comfortably'' because they expect too much.

    I read the source article and it contained more than is said here. It said most people consider OVERSEAS TRAVEL and REGULAR RESTAURANT DINNERS ''necessities'', not to mention a lot of other luxuries we never expected when we were young - and most don't either have or expect now!

    Instead of attacking retirees, the Government should be educating the young to understand that they need to work and save for what they want - not expect huge salaries, low tax, and handouts from mum and dad to give them everything they want from day one.
    Sundays
    18th Feb 2016
    1:59pm
    I agree completely and remember when fancy restaurants were for special occasions. We didn't go overseas until we had paid off the mortgage, and at that stage our two adult children had travelled a lot more. Sadly, too many people do not know how to budget, save or even how to cook healthy and cheap meals, and do basic maintenance.
    Mygasheater
    18th Feb 2016
    8:08pm
    Personally, I blame the parents and the grandparents for fostering those unrealistic expectations in young people.
    buby
    19th Feb 2016
    1:48pm
    Yes thats how it was for me Sundays, fancy restaurants, were special occasions. Mainly coss my husband stashed his cash, and bought motorbikes instead of the morgage. i had only one child; and i worked hard.
    He wasn't a good example to her at all.
    For now she has 3kids, she does work, but hasn't paid her morgages, puts holidays ahead of bills.
    She will suffer, i tried to steer her in the right direction. But to NO avail. Even the grandkids, when they get some $ they just waiting to splash it, instead of stashing some, and spending some.
    A balance is needed for a well lived life! :)
    Phil1943
    18th Feb 2016
    11:59am
    Everybody's different and some people simply aren't up to managing their finances responsibly. Others just don't earn enough money to participate in what most of us take for granted - from occasional meals in restaurants to interstate travel for example. We don't all have the same economic conditions and some are better off than others.
    Yes, the superannuation system needs a good examination with a view to cutting down on expenses for the costs of having super - fees, accounting charges, etc - as well as to making sure deductibility for contributions can't be used as a tax lurk. Fair enough.
    What I really object to is the government seeing the 'pool' of superannuation funds as some sort of public asset, there to be manipulated or taxed for the benefit of federal revenues. It must be, as Mr Haggar says, 'a long-term product that needs stable policy'.
    Spend the time, be apolitical (especially hard for the ALP with its union ties), and come up with a system that works for everyone who uses it, that won't be fiddled with by governments to raise revenues, and that has rules that stay the same so retirement can be planned from early in the working life.
    This would be a start towards ensuring that retirement doesn't mean poverty for nearly half of the population.
    Mygasheater
    18th Feb 2016
    8:11pm
    That everyone has the same level of knowledge and financial skills is an assumption that runs through many of the posts on this site.

    Along with a lot of blaming the victim.
    Anonymous
    21st Feb 2016
    8:19am
    Also that everyone has opportunity and nobody faces devastating life challenges. Seems the privileged can't see well enough to note that not everyone enjoys their good fortune.

    I had very good money management skills, but try starting out at 14 as an orphan with no money, skills or education and no family support, and then having to shell out the equivalent of the price of 5 houses to provide medical care and special education for a child born with a disability, and THEN having your partner suffer an accident and be unable to ever work again (just when the eldest child was entering high school).

    Despite that, we put all the kids through university and managed to own a home in retirement and even have some savings. And now we are being told we have no right to a small part pension to top up an income of half the aged pension! SICK!

    Frankly, if I had my time over, I wouldn't manage my money well at all. I'd spend up big, ignore the debts for my child's medical care, declare bankruptcy, and collect a full aged pension today.

    No wonder some of the younger generation are irresponsible with money. More power to them!
    PIXAPD
    18th Feb 2016
    12:08pm
    The BABY BOOMERS did their bit and it's about time this generation did theirs.....that's it
    Brue
    18th Feb 2016
    3:50pm
    I am a Baby Boomer. I worked hard all my life. very raely took a sickie. No super for subcontractor tradie. Didn.t smoke or drink(occasionally drink at dinners)Didn't spend on the latest gadgets or fashions. I bought a lot of label clothes second hand .I managed to pay for my house. Owe $500.00 average on plastic. I own a car , a ute and a motorbike(all average 12 years old) look after your vehicles and they will last a long time. I eat well . I have travelled overseas once every two years. anyone can do it. It just takes a bit of determination. I am now enjoying life on the pension.
    Mygasheater
    18th Feb 2016
    8:06pm
    Yes, well lived through the Depression, fought WW2.

    Oh bugger, that was my parents.
    Anonymous
    21st Feb 2016
    8:28am
    ''Anyone can do it''. What if you'd had no trade because you were an orphan forced out to a labouring job at 14, and then your first child was born with a crippling disability and you had to go into debt to the tune of the price of 5 modest homes to give the child the necessary medical care and special education, and then your partner had an accident and could never work again? You think you'd do so well, Brue?

    ''ANYONE'' can't do anything. Everyone's circumstances are different. What the arrogant and ignorant here don't seem to understand is that life presents massive challenges for some.

    That said, I agree that most of today's young are living it up and don't appreciate what they have. I doubt any of them know real hardship. That would be a good thing if there wasn't so much selfishness driving a campaign to strip retirees of everything they worked for and earned, and trying to kick disabled people off welfare and bash people who can't find work in a world where there are tens of thousands more unemployed than job opportunities.
    Anonymous
    21st Feb 2016
    5:24pm
    Brue, this is why I'm furious at the changes in the pension assets test. Okay, you worked hard and didn't take may sickies, didn't smoke and drink, and didn't spend on luxuries. But you admit you travelled overseas once every two years. Now you enjoy life on the pension.
    I, on the other hand, couldn't learn a trade due to early disadvantage, earned shit wages, had a great deal of sickness, and supported a disabled child, but managed to save by NOT going overseas, building my own house on weekends, making furniture, renovating old cars, and generally knocking myself out with hard work and sacrifice. Now I have to drain my savings so people like you can ''enjoy life on the pension''? How is this ''fair''?
    PIXAPD
    18th Feb 2016
    12:45pm
    I'm on the full aged pension, I rent and still save $600 a month..
    Glen48
    18th Feb 2016
    12:46pm
    As long as the Feds keep borrowing 110 M a day to pay the pension
    MICK
    18th Feb 2016
    1:09pm
    And their mates the fossil fuel industry ($8 billion a year!!). And let's not forget about tax avoiding multinationals and the superannuation scam for the rich. And so the list rolls on................
    If we had governments working for the country rather than the bid end of town there would be more than enough money to go around. With the current lot average people are little more than milking cows.
    Mygasheater
    18th Feb 2016
    8:14pm
    mick,

    Please remember our fine politicians have to keep an eye on the future.

    Their future, for a cushy job after politics because as you know the pension is barely enough to live on. Poor devils.
    Anonymous
    21st Feb 2016
    8:30am
    Oh, now the truth comes out, Pixapd. ''Holier than though'' not incurring debt, but despite your claimed superiority, you didn't save enough to even part-fund your own retirement.

    Maybe you should stop gloating and condemning people whose situation you know absolutely nothing about?
    Anonymous
    21st Feb 2016
    5:26pm
    No wonder those hurt by the assets test changes are angry! People like Pixapd, who obviously didn't have much hardship (since debt wasn't necessary) get a full pension while people who did it really tough but struggled to save are forced to drain their hard-won savings to pay pensions to people who lived the high life.
    Alexia_x
    18th Feb 2016
    2:42pm
    The phase
    "With the average household earning $77,676 annually, the research suggests there is a “clear disconnect between the definition of lifestyle and standards of living” really intrigues me, after all pensioners get a lot less than that and are supposed to make ends meet.
    When are pensioners going to get $77,676 a year? NEVER!!!!
    particolor
    21st Feb 2016
    11:26pm
    Put Simply.. I never used to, but I am now !! STRUGGLING ! :-( :-(
    I cant BANK $600 a Month any more ! :-) :-)
    Chris B T
    18th Feb 2016
    3:23pm
    When they say the average household, it would be nice to say how many adults and children.
    This would give a better perspective on the cost of living to the average amount earnt.
    The family allowance/tax concessions with young children.
    Two adults and three young children wouldn't be much better than, a couple on full aged pension. Relative speaking on earning and spending.
    particolor
    18th Feb 2016
    8:27pm
    Yeah OK ! :-( What else is New ? And nothing is going to change any time soon ! :-(
    ex PS
    19th Feb 2016
    10:02am
    You can do the right thing, think about your future and put extra money into Super instead of urinating it against a wall.
    What advantage to your retirement do you get, the people who have done no planning and have spent every cent they have earned on having a good time get to accuse you of exploiting the system, the government changes the rules that you have used to plan your future in order to get their hands on your money and hard working Australians are lumped in with entitled millionaires so that the government can justify doinng them over.
    My advice to young people just starting in the workforce is don't put any extra into Super as there is no guarantee that the government will let you have access in the way you need towhen you expect to claim it. It is almost as if the government wants us to depend on a pension so that we can be more easily controlled. Under this government Superannuation is becoming a dirty word.
    Anonymous
    21st Feb 2016
    8:32am
    Couldn't agree more. Government has killed incentive and reward to over-indulge the filthy rich and to squander our money, and now some fools wonder why the young don't want to work, save and invest!

    21st Feb 2016
    5:28pm
    Another article I read said young folk consider $200,000 p.a. income ''middle class'', not well off. How, then, does anyone conclude retirees are doing well and can afford to have their incomes cut to enable tax cuts for those still earning?
    Anonymous
    23rd Feb 2016
    12:33pm
    People who cannot manage on $200K make me sick. They are obviously living beyond their means and I have zero sympathy for any of them.

    I was one of those who put 10% into super for 5 years before retirement after listening to someone give a talk re retirement planning.

    If they keep changing the rules there is absolutely no incentive for others to do as I did. Becoming self funded has its good points for sure but who knows what will happen now with all the changes in the wind.
    Happy Jack
    21st Feb 2016
    9:09pm
    You, Rainey: are an absolute legend. The stuff that real Ozzie's are made of. And after battling all your life and managing to scrape a few bucks together the leeches are gearing up to move in on you. I bet they they've done their calculations and come to the conclusion that for their political expediency, better to move into you than their leeching financial supporters. ? Take the character that's donated 2 million, you you heard it, two million over the last two years. Does any donor hand that much over without expecting anything in return? I'll let you answer that question.
    Clementine
    23rd Feb 2016
    12:12pm
    Dont you know that you should all just have a 'well-paid job that pays good money'
    particolor
    27th Mar 2016
    7:18pm
    OH If only there were some well paid jobs left in this Country !! :-)
    Outside of Parliament :-)
    Kaz
    27th Mar 2016
    12:03pm
    Reading the December costs budget, figures are not realistic and the amount advised as required for a comfortable retirement will not provide comfort and seem to be off the mark in reality.
    Glen48
    27th Mar 2016
    1:52pm
    Feds about to spend 32 K on a portrait for browwy Bishop so still plenty of money around,,
    particolor
    27th Mar 2016
    7:20pm
    :-) :-)