Child-free aeroplane seats

Asia-based airline Scoot has introduced child-free zones on their aircraft.

Child-free aeroplane seats

Singapore Airlines' budget subsidiary Scoot has introduced child-free zones on their aircraft after the successful implementation of a similar policy by AirAsia X earlier this year.

Located directly behind business class, the ScootSilence cabin is similar to premium economy seats offering more leg room on Australian flights. The major difference is that children under 12 are banned from sitting in this area of the plane. Depending on the flight, for an additional $16, or more, an upgrade to the ScootSilence cabin will be available to passengers. An online opinion poll on ABCnews.com in February revealed that one-third of passengers would be willing to pay more for a child-free flight if it were offered by other airlines.

AirAsia X’s international head of marketing, Stuart Myerscough, told the SMH that passenger feedback had been “overwhelmingly positive” and that the new quiet zone, which was introduced on all AirAsia X aircraft in February, had been a “success and one of our most popular innovations”. AirAsia X charges around $15 extra for seating in this section of the aircraft.

Read more from SMH.
Read more form News.com.au.

Opinion: Children ruin holidays for passengers

Long-haul flights, for most passengers, are rough at the best of times, but when you add a disobedient child or a crying baby into the equation, this can result in a sleepless flight. I have nothing against parents taking their children on planes, if anything, I feel sorry for them. The glares and looks they get when their child is misbehaving, or in the case of infants, crying, is simply unfair.

Because of a screaming baby, I still vividly remember a flight from Melbourne to Los Angeles, on my first ever overseas trip. I would estimate that around eight of the 14 hours on board the ‘flight from hell’ involved this couple’s baby crying at least 10 times an hour. The parents tried their best to calm their baby down, but there was simply nothing else they could do.

In hindsight, I may have been in part to blame for my own misery. By choosing an aisle seat at the front of a cabin section, there was always a strong chance that I would be positioned near a baby. This is one of the many reasons why I now always book a seat in the back three rows of the plane. I really like this inovation from Scoot for the new child-free area. It not only assures you of an area free of young children, but it also ensures you have extra leg room, all at an affordable price. If I ever have the opportunity of flying Scoot, I will certainly give the child-free zone a test flight.

How about you? Have you had a ‘flight from hell’? Would you pay a small additional fee to sit in a child-free zone?





    COMMENTS

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    Chat
    22nd Aug 2013
    10:51am
    While I agree that crying babies and disobedient children can be an annoyance on any flight but particularly on long haul flight I find having to sit beside or behind obese people worse. There is so little space in an economy seat anyway and when a person in front is so large that their seat pushes back --- and that is before they recline their seat--- it gives even less space. People who fully recline their seats take away all available space from the person behind making it nearly impossible to even get out of the seat to go to the toilet without doing damage to your back. Didel
    Drew
    22nd Aug 2013
    11:01am
    Hi Didel,

    A little known fact, on most flights, the Aisle seat's arm-rest can actually be pushed back. There is a small button that needs to be pushed backwards with a little bit of force. It is located directly under where you would place your elbow.

    I hope this helps a little in your future flights.
    Drew
    ozirules
    22nd Aug 2013
    11:49am
    perhaps the people with children should be the ones paying more for a sound proof booth. I do know that there is nothing you can do for a baby suffering from painful air pressure problems. You cant exactly tell them to swallow or suck a lolly but this dosnt help long suffering passengers. Beware though Drew as I have noticed on many flights that the back few rows are reserved for passengers with small children so your tactic may work against you. I also agree with Chat that sitting next to an obese person is terrible.They ooze into your seat space which is inadequate enough to start with. Pity we cant all fly first class, cattle class is a well earned title for economy.
    Penqueen1949
    22nd Aug 2013
    12:21pm
    I pity any crying small child or baby on a plane who probably has at the very least fluid in their middle ear causing extreme pain. They can't tell what is wrong, so crying is their only option. A middle ear infection and flying don't mix and can lead to a ruptured ear drum. I took every precaution I could on my recent trip to WA and back because of recurring middle ear infections and I still had some intense ear pain. My stepsister said she flew from Perth to Brisbane with a cold and she was in tears from the pain the whole way. Spare a thought for the little ones who are more than likely in extreme pain......
    Margo
    22nd Aug 2013
    1:34pm
    Yes, I agree - my heart goes out for these little ones.
    Penqueen1949
    22nd Aug 2013
    12:25pm
    I found the large bloke sitting near me and snoring very loudly on a red eye flight from Darwin to Brisbane a few years back to be more annoying than any child could be. Children and babies only cry from distress such as extreme pain.....
    biedronka
    22nd Aug 2013
    1:27pm
    People who drink too much.and vomit are not much fun either or alcohol fumes or no deodrant
    Margo
    22nd Aug 2013
    1:32pm
    I certainly would pay - babies crying I could contend with but uncontrollable children jumping, swinging off the back of my seat, digging into the back of my seat - I can't stand - makes it hard to sleep at night on long overseas trips. I would very much like Qantas to have this option.
    Pass the Ductape
    22nd Aug 2013
    1:50pm
    Or how about seat ejectors Margo!
    Pass the Ductape
    22nd Aug 2013
    1:40pm
    Would I what? Lead me to it son! Whilst I to detest the drying baby moments - and more so as I get older; (it's an probably an oldie thing) but I can attest to the fact that often the cabin pressure in some flights leaves a lot to be desired and some of us a more prone to the pressure changes (like a baby perhaps) or it could be that the child was feeling ill for any number of reasons.

    I think airlines should introduce a big box which is carried underneath the plane, where anyone guilty of these occurrences, (also passengers who leave their seats to look out of the window as the plane is landing or who drop their seat back into your lap without asking) could be placed and made to stay their until the aircraft lands. Should the box hit the ground before the wheels upon landing, then so be it. You can't account for bad luck!
    Pass the Ductape
    22nd Aug 2013
    1:47pm
    Oh dear me thinks me needs me nap! Read 'crying' for drying and 'stay there' - for stay their.... Aha, that's better isn't it?
    PlanB
    22nd Aug 2013
    2:43pm
    I have given up on flights altogether--too much hassle these days
    Pass the Ductape
    22nd Aug 2013
    3:04pm
    I agree PlanB! I now prefer to drive most places I can in Australia within a day or two of the destination I intend to go; this despite the cost of fuel and motel accommodation. The last time I arrived at Sydney airport I was so treated like someone about to be sent to jail: made to take off my shoes, empty my pockets, remove all metal bits and pieces, including my trouser braces - which incidentally are rather difficult to put back on without loosing your strides in the process. All this done in front of dozens of strangers by foreign airport attendants who looked as though THEY themselves should have been the ones requiring to be searched - not myself!
    PlanB
    22nd Aug 2013
    4:38pm
    Yes Duck, Can aslo take what you like and go where you please and NO ONE coughing all over you either
    KKKKatie
    22nd Aug 2013
    5:35pm
    On a flight from Singapore to London I sat behind a lady spraying herself with perfume quite often. Felt quite sick by the time we arrived.
    Figtree
    22nd Aug 2013
    6:32pm
    There should be an designated area, for people travelling with children under three years, where there is more room for them to manage their child, stuck in middle seats with a baby on long haul flights must be a thing of nightmares, stressed Mothers equal stressed bub and irate fellow travellers.
    Also give the flight attendants some authority to remove annoying kids from the cabin, they don't accept bad behaviour from adults with too 'many drinks on board'. Quick to have them met by the authorities, perhaps the same rules of etiquette could be outlined to parents whose offspring are a menace to other fare paying passengers and plane safety. What's the Nanny programme advocate 'a time out room', perhaps in the luggage hold. And it seem very remiss with the number of aeroplane travelling babies, no drug company has explored a produce or better still a non drug remedy, which could help with inner ear pain. Agree with the use of one's own vehicle in preference to Australian flights, but Europe or the Americas.... somewhat of a challenge. Fly well.
    KSS
    22nd Aug 2013
    8:04pm
    I remember the days when smokers were quarantined together in one section of the plane. I have often thought it would be a good idea to quarantine parents with children in one section. This seems to me to afford many advantages, the crew can look after their needs better, the kids would entertain each other and kick the seat in front with impunity, the parents would receive fewer glares and huffing and puffing from other passengers, and the other passengers would have a less disruptive flight. Wins all round!
    KSS
    22nd Aug 2013
    8:05pm
    And no-one has to pay extra!!
    Nightshade
    22nd Aug 2013
    8:14pm
    There is very little imagination when it comes to the design of an airplane's seating -
    A airplane can be designed so that all the "stuff" inside the plane can be repositioned so as to suit the customer intake.
    big ones over here
    small ones over here
    skinny over here
    incontinent next to the toilet.
    THE PEOPLE RUNNING THE SHOW HAVE HAD THE SPELL OF STUPIDITY CAST UPON THEM, THAT'S ALL.
    Ritza
    23rd Aug 2013
    5:48pm
    I like to have lunch at local hotel with good,fairly cheap food...but not on Saturday or Sunday as the families come ( and it is nice to see the families doing something together)
    I asked the publican if he would have a child -free room for those of us who like it a little quieter.

    His answer : No because all the parents would want to sit there :))

    25th Aug 2013
    2:51pm
    how about child-free flights? i think they would be a winner. book me in now.
    MiningMagnet
    25th Aug 2013
    5:37pm
    Sign me up
    I ask at check-in if I am positioned within earshot of babies on planes and act to move to a 'safe zone' on the plane and I know I am not alone.
    On longer flights I have even used business class to escape the spinal-tap intrusion of an uncontrolled child.
    Having traveled with my kids (3 off) for many years I know how much fun a screaming infant can be
    There are lots of things that can be done by parents to minimise the drama....but many seem either unaware of how or unwilling to act
    Pardelope
    25th Aug 2013
    7:05pm
    A visit to the GP to discuss possible problems and preventatives should be a requirement for anyone intending to take an infant or child under 12 on a (longer than 2 hours) flight. The doctor might suggest certain foods or drinks - or perhaps pain-killers or sedatives.

    If the child (or an adult) has had a cold, hay-fever, or other upset within the last fortnight, they should not fly. Even the pressure change at 3,000 feet is enough to cause agony (on non-pressurised aircraft). Pressure is generally kept at 10,000 feet on pressurised aircraft, so the problem can be excruciating for the sufferer (and those listening to them).

    On busy routes, it should be financially viable to have child-free flights - or kiddies flights.

    Seating varies on different aircraft - and different airlines. Some routes have economy "cattle class" or "sardine class", whilst others work on "anchovy class" (squashed, sticky, and smelly). There are websites where you can check the seating plans and compare airlines.
    melbgirl
    26th Aug 2013
    7:34pm
    Last flight was ruined by a boy of about 8 shouting and whinging the whole flight, when he demanded sweets loudly throughout the safety demo I asked the parents to quieten him, and was told he was just a kid-it was obviously me who was the problem. The parents didn't even turn their phones off for take-off and landing - maybe separate flights for rude selfish people would be more appropriate, by the way all the babies and toddlers on board behaved very well.
    Pardelope
    27th Aug 2013
    2:44am
    melbgirl - ah - but don't you know they are the only ones who have ever re-produced and their offspring is so unique they are not bound by normal rules? (Just kidding).

    Leaving electronic equipment switched on - especially during take-off and landing - can be very dangerous. If you see someone who is not following the rules, write a short note and hand it unobtrusively to the flight attendants. Print clearly their seat number and a brief description of them and what they are doing. Ask that they keep your identity secret until the offenders have left the aircraft.
    Pass the Ductape
    27th Aug 2013
    9:11am
    NO WAY Paredelope! You are trying the soft approach with people who are risking your life!

    Stand up - and say in a very loud voice and ike you really mean it - "What the hell is wrong with you people - are you trying to get us all killed?"

    Then calmly sit down and watch the action.
    Pardelope
    27th Aug 2013
    6:30pm
    The reason for doing it that way is (a) because the staff can immediatly warn the Captain - who can then abort the takeoff/landing if necessary - or he/she can make an announcement from the cockpit. (b) is I am not a large, young, male who can easily intimidate and prevent reprisals (without causing distress and concern to other passengers).
    PlanB
    27th Aug 2013
    7:27am
    Hell at the age of 8 and carrying on like that--I know who the problem is and it is the parents and their parenting and why we have so many dead beat kids these days
    Pardelope
    27th Aug 2013
    6:48pm
    "Why do we have so many dead beat kids these days?" I think too many parents and grandparents (who went through hard times), have tried to make life (much too) easy for their kids and grand kids.

    There was also the influence of Dr Spock - who later (much too late) admitted that his theories on bringing up children had been flawed.

    There were also the (sometimes) stupid restrictions placed on occasionally using (mild) corporal punishment. Before anyone gets upset at this comment - I don't believe in the cane, strap, fists, or other weapons - only a light slap on the buttocks to get attention, going without a meal, going without a treat, being denied pocket money, or being sent to bed early (with no book, tv, or other entertainment).

    The result is we now have two generations who have become self-centred and undisciplined.


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