Friday Flash Poll: Has ANZAC Day become overhyped?

Have we forgotten the true meaning of ANZAC Day?

Friday Flash Poll: Has ANZAC Day become overhyped?

As a young’un, I remember ANZAC Day was a reserved day of quiet contemplation and respect for the fallen who fought in wars and conflicts.

Nowadays, it seems, it’s treated more as an alternative Australia Day.

And that’s okay with me, so long as the original sentiment is not forgotten. But some traditionalists are concerned that ANZAC Day is viewed by too many as a celebration and not so much as a commemoration, that it is overrun by hype and nationalism and is treated by some as ‘just a day off work’.

You might think that when the last of the Gallipoli veterans passed, that the day itself might have lost significance. Not so. ANZAC Day crowds have grown to record numbers. Festivals fire up after dawn services. Expect to find expensive food trucks, vendors selling overpriced ‘patriotic’ products and whatever other commercial opportunities can be milked from ‘Australian pride’ – oh, and the odd Australian Armed Services stall here and there.

A day that was once set aside to honour and respect the ANZACs has become a day of flag-waving and jingoism.

Last year, around $320 million was spent to mark the 100th anniversary of ANZAC Day – $140 million of which came from taxpayers.

While honouring the heroism, bravery and commitment to freedom shown by our long fallen soldiers is certainly not to be scorned, could that money have been better spent on helping living service personnel?

Hundreds of defence force personnel suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Many veterans struggle to cope when they return to civilian life, sometimes resulting in drug and alcohol abuse, domestic violence and mental health issues. That $140 million would have gone a long way to easing their situations.

The ANZAC Day slogan is Lest we forget. Have we forgotten the true meaning of this solemn day? Why not tell us what you think in our Friday Flash Poll?

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What is ‘the ANZAC spirit’? What does ANZAC Day mean to you? Why not share your opinion in the comments section below?





    COMMENTS

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    ianfin
    19th Apr 2019
    10:12am
    Anzac Day means a lot to me and family having members who have fought in most theatres of war we attend the Dawn Service and I march with other Veterans on this day in remembrance of mates who did not return and those that have passed since and particularly those that still suffer from War Caused disabilities.
    MICK
    19th Apr 2019
    11:06am
    And that's exactly what it should be ianfin. A remembrance by all of us with the families of affected Australians at the top of this list.
    I've been watching Anzac Day being hijacked by the media and business trying to cash in and the show created has drowned out what the day should signify to all of us: remembering the price of war and the marking of family of their loss.
    Anonymous
    19th Apr 2019
    1:21pm
    As a TPI Veteran Anzac Day is important as it reminds us of the great sacrifices many young Australians made so our country can be free - they symbolise our customs, values and traditions.
    I utterly detest those so called academics and others who chose to denigrate Anzac Day.
    If we ever come under attack these cowards would be the first to seek help
    Tom Tank
    19th Apr 2019
    1:25pm
    Not to mention the politicians who muscle in with the same old trite comments. Given wars are the result of the failure by politicians to act in the best interests of their country. Very few politicians who have served in a war actually take their country into another war.
    Tom Tank
    19th Apr 2019
    1:25pm
    Not to mention the politicians who muscle in with the same old trite comments. Given wars are the result of the failure by politicians to act in the best interests of their country. Very few politicians who have served in a war actually take their country into another war.
    TREBOR
    20th Apr 2019
    11:29am
    Totally correct, Bob Menzies. 'jingo-ism' - where does someone come up with such a thing to remember the sacrifice and hard toil and such of the many? Grandfathers, fathers, uncles and ladies of families have fought and suffered and sometimes died for this nation, so some five minute Aussie can call it 'trite' and 'jingoistic', just like that furruner in WA who said that Australians who wave flags etc on Australia Day (now deemed by a remote minority to be 'invasion day') are 'yobs' and 'bogans'.

    **dusts off slouch hat and multiple berets of various kinds - I don't go to services, BTW**
    Anonymous
    22nd Apr 2019
    8:22am
    Trebor, Your not alone in not going to services - does not mean you don't care - I know many who stay at home and reflect - I lost my beret 30 years ago
    Arisaid
    19th Apr 2019
    10:28am
    Perhaps a little. However by encouraging young people to take part in ceremonies, school curriculum etc. The brave men and women will not be forgotten. My Grandad was at Gallipoli and an Uncle killed on the long March after the fall of Singapore. Lest we forget
    Jenny
    19th Apr 2019
    10:29am
    I am concerned that friction between nations, along with the rise in nationalism worldwide, could increase the likelihood of future large-scale wars similar to the two World Wars. Inappropriate celebration of war could influence the way we choose to negotiate with those nations with whom we are in disagreement.. Anzac Day must remain an occasion for quiet reflection on the terrible losses that war creates.
    TREBOR
    19th Apr 2019
    10:54am
    Hmm .. agree with you about current trends internationally... and of course, quiet reflection on the tragedy of war is the go. Not entirely sure that many really see it as a jingoistic thing or whatever.
    Crowcrag
    19th Apr 2019
    10:36am
    Both my mother and father, my father in law and my grandfather were enlisted in either of the two world wars. Two attended A Days until they became jingo-used. They then refused.
    I understood their point of view. I agree with it. When do we stop ‘remembering’ wars?
    It was not until the 19th century that the British stopped selling the remains of dead soldiers from the battlefield to fertiliser manufacturers. So much for patriotism!
    Cowboy Jim
    20th Apr 2019
    9:30am
    After we go we all somehow become fertiliser but we PAY a few thousand bucks for the process. What I do not understand is the importance of digging the old boys up and bury them again in some dedicated place. Let them rest in peace where they fell.
    Deborah advocating for an Australian as head of state
    19th Apr 2019
    10:39am
    ANZAC day has become a celebration and less a commemoration of the sacrifice. It is also being used as a tool to forge an Australian identity -that this is the day Australia became a nation. But Australians were sacrificed to an ill conceived and poorly executed plan of which we had little part in organising. Australia became a nation at Federation. We are using Australia Day and ANZAC Day as a means to build identity -both times in history that were directed by non-Australians.
    Sundays
    19th Apr 2019
    12:10pm
    We attend our local Dawn service each year along with hundreds of others of all ages. It’s nothing like a celebration but a very moving service of commemoration. The Anzac March is a more heartwarming event but the format hasn’t changed. It was always a flag waving event
    Anonymous
    19th Apr 2019
    1:24pm
    no thanks our constitutional monarchy system has served us well
    ronloby
    19th Apr 2019
    10:49am
    I am ex-Air Force and I had an Uncle killed on the Sandakan Death March in WW2 and 2 great Uncles killed in France in WW1. These along with thousands of other brave diggers MUST NEVER be FORGOTTEN! "Lest We Forget".
    Anonymous
    19th Apr 2019
    4:57pm
    I went to university with a fellow who was the son of one of the 12 survivors of Sandakan, Dr Frank Mills. My late father was a naval commando who participated in the liberation of Australian prisoners from POW camps. He once told me they were scheduled to attack the Japanese running Sandakan, but that the operation was cancelled at the last minute, the reason for which ever since has been a closely guarded military secret. Some sort of political bastardry?
    TREBOR
    19th Apr 2019
    10:51am
    No ... next question....
    feefifofum
    19th Apr 2019
    10:55am
    ANZAC Day is the opportunity to remember all those who sacrificed their lives in all wars; a chance to thank those who fought in past wars; and a chance to thank those who still serve today to protect our country. It’s not a day of celebration but a day of remembrance and commemoration
    80 plus
    19th Apr 2019
    7:19pm
    Well said, I lay a wreath on ANZAC day and on the 11th of November, my father and all my uncles served in world war 2, and I am an ex serviceman, my wreath is a tribute to those who defended our way of life and not a glorification of war.
    Troubadour
    19th Apr 2019
    8:31pm
    Fully agree with you. We have had some in the 1st world War - my
    husbands uncle being killed at Ypres, and members of our family in every
    service of the defence forces in the 2nd World War - and thankfully all
    came home. So yes it ia a day of Remembrance and thankfulness.
    It is so heartening to see young people marching and taking part in
    Anzac activities and being given the opportunity to know more about
    the 2 Great Wars and the others since.
    Bellbird
    19th Apr 2019
    11:18am
    Keep Anzac day as a lower-key, solemn commemoration of the loss of lives in war. Don't get carried away with nationalism and near-glorification of conflicts. Look at the utter stupidity and futility of the Gallipoli campaign, and WW1 in general, and the tens of thousands of lives lost. My great uncle who died at Gallipoli on 27 April 1915, and so many of his generation, were sent to their deaths by fools. In WW2 we had no choice but to fight, but it was a nasty business. My father just wanted to forget his PNG campaign experiences. Let's think how we might prevent further wars: Howard's blind following of the US into Afghanistan and Iraq were particularly ill advised commitments.
    Anonymous
    19th Apr 2019
    4:59pm
    The prime culprit for the Gallipoli debacle was the Lord of the Admiralty, Winston Churchill.
    Anonymous
    22nd Apr 2019
    8:30am
    Knows-a lot - not quite true - Churchill was heavily involved in the planning and approved the operation BUT his generals did not follow the plan and were inept. Kitchner was a worse culprit
    PerthSV
    19th Apr 2019
    11:27am
    The last time Australian soldiers defended our shores was during the second world war, since then we have been subservient to the US military business juggernaut invading third world countries and killing innocent civilians.

    The US political system and now the Australian political system uses media to glorify war and place soldiers on a pedestal. Soldiers these days are nothing but mercenaries being paid to push buttons to remotely bomb children. During the Vietnam war the American people condemned returning soldiers for the atrocities caused there, now the atrocities continue but the media sanitises the news and these murdering soldiers return as heroes.

    Scomo uses poor asylum seekers as political fodder to beat his chest and build up nationalism, he will very quickly pour money into the military and send us to war just to demonstrate how tough he is.

    War is nothing but a farce.
    Anonymous
    19th Apr 2019
    11:48am
    I find your post totally offensive. Thanks to the soldiers who you condemn, your right to post rubbish such as this is enshrined in our Constitution.
    strikey
    19th Apr 2019
    12:03pm
    Old Man sadly political trolls are everywhere these days. Their left wing rhetoric thrives on trolling every social media space known. I am glad there are some like you around to call it for what it is. Offensive!
    ghoti
    19th Apr 2019
    12:12pm
    I don't find PerthSV's comment at all offensive. Not even mildly. What, in your view, is offensive about it?
    PerthSV
    19th Apr 2019
    12:39pm
    So Old Man and Strikey, both of you can justify Australia being part of the coalition of the willing invading Iraq and killing 1,200,000 people because of lies perpetrated by Bush, Blair and Howard. The US soldiers openly admit to murdering the very same Iraqis that they were supposed to be there to liberate.

    I hope Old Man and Strikey you are offended by third world countries being invaded for no justifiable reason.
    Sceptic
    19th Apr 2019
    12:58pm
    So PerthSV, and ghoti, The original comment from PerthSV is extremely offensive. He may well have a distorted opinion on service personnel, and he is entitled to that opinion, and entitled to voice it. but I am sure that he/she knew that it was offensive and was posted for just that reason. ghoti, your comment is purely provocative as the offensiveness is obvious. The end comment is purely ridiculous and clearly false political nonsense. Clearly, you, PerthSV are just declaring your political leanings.
    PerthSV
    19th Apr 2019
    1:16pm
    So Australia gets invaded by the US or China. A soldier sitting in his air-conditioned office controlling a drone to bomb the hell out of Sydney destroying the infrastructure including power stations, hospitals, dams, waste treatment plants, bridges and airports. Eventually half a million dead, 3 million refugees seeking asylum in Indonesia and 1 million unaccounted for. He returns to his country as a heroic veteran for putting his life on the line. Is he a hero or a murdering mercenary?

    We helped in the invasion of Afghanistan. Our soldiers suffered 41 dead of those 6 were helicopter accidents, 8 by our allies the Afghan National army, 1 non-combat death. No mention of how many by friendly fire. In the meantime, conservatively, well over 100,000 mainly civilian Afghanis have lost their lives.
    Anonymous
    19th Apr 2019
    1:27pm
    PerthSV and dhoti - I'm a TPI Vet and you comments are offensive to me
    PerthSV
    19th Apr 2019
    1:36pm
    Well Bob, being a soldier isn’t even the in the list of the most dangerous occupations out there. Many Australians are serving your needs who have a greater chance of dying then you did and are not being glorified yearly.

    Australia’s 10 most dangerous professions are:
    1. Agriculture, forestry and fishing
    2. Transport, postal and warehousing
    3. Construction
    4. Manufacturing
    5. Wholesale trade
    6. Mining
    7. Health care and social assistance
    8. Public administration and safety
    9. Electricity, gas, water and waste services
    10. Administration and support services

    Perhaps we should recognise our farmers who put their life on the line every day of the year to provide you with food. Our truckies who deliver the food. The builders who give you shelter. They take greater risk in looking after Australia then our soldiers did in invading other countries. Perhaps they should be offended.
    TREBOR
    20th Apr 2019
    11:32am
    A soldier/sailor/airperson may hold his/her own views about a conflict to which he/she is committed - duty comes first, not politics.

    It's the politicians who've screwed us all.... blame them.
    Anonymous
    22nd Apr 2019
    8:28am
    Pertt SV - your an idiot - only military can be called upon to defend nation and be shot and killed - I am aware of the list you provide and ADF was not considered as it was domestic jobs.
    I was a sailor not a soldier but airmen,sailors and soldiers it does not matter - it is what they have done and are still doing that matters.
    should this country ever be in danger then you'd be the first to yell out for help.
    The others on the list would not be offended as most understand why Anzac Day occurs - your views are repulsive, repugnant to me and lack coherency and cogency.
    MJM
    19th Apr 2019
    11:48am
    Anzac Day is my birthday. So yes too much about the day not enough about me. Haha
    violet
    19th Apr 2019
    11:50am
    My father spent years in a German POW (although not an Anzac - I'm an immigrant) and I appreciate his and another family MEMBER'S current service in the ADF, and other ancestors in WW1 - but find the hype these days over the top, getting worse and assuming political overtones. The idea of Anzac day as being sacred, and the more flags you wave and money you throw at memorials, the better, is verging on dangerous IMO.
    Also, the historical focus on the white Anglo Australian archetypal digger is insulting to aboriginal diggers, women and and others who helped the war effort, dealt with the loss of or life-changing injuries (mental and physical) of their loved ones, etc. And then there are our new immigrants, some of whom would be descendants of Indians and East Africans who fought for the British...and others not involved in "our" wars.
    I could go on...

    19th Apr 2019
    11:52am
    Whenever there is criticism of Anzac Day, those against it wrongly suggest that is glorification of war. Those of us who have served or are descendants of those who served all know the truth that it is a day of reflection and commemoration, remembering those who made the supreme sacrifice or came home with physical or psychological wounds.

    Lest we forget.
    strikey
    19th Apr 2019
    11:56am
    Tell me then if the lefty nutters see AUSTRALIA Day as Invasion Day and now you suggest in your headline Anzac Day is Over Hyped! What do we as a nation have left that is truly Australian? Seems like another attempt to bash anything that is truly ours!!
    Anonymous
    19th Apr 2019
    1:28pm
    well said
    Digby
    19th Apr 2019
    2:08pm
    very well said couldn't agree more
    Tom Tank
    19th Apr 2019
    2:19pm
    I have hardly missed participating in an Anzac Day march in the last 50 years even although I didn't serve in the military. Back in the 60's and 70's it had a different feel to it than it does today. The jingo-ism wasn't there then and that was very Australian. We were there for the Diggers. The media treated it with a feeling of respect rather than the false hushed reverential tones now used. The politicians didn't look on it as a photo opportunity to garner votes.

    Overall it was simpler and not overdone, in other words lacked the hype it gets now. look at the footy played on Anzac Day as that is a good demonstration of what hype is all about.
    Tom Tank
    19th Apr 2019
    2:19pm
    I have hardly missed participating in an Anzac Day march in the last 50 years even although I didn't serve in the military. Back in the 60's and 70's it had a different feel to it than it does today. The jingo-ism wasn't there then and that was very Australian. We were there for the Diggers. The media treated it with a feeling of respect rather than the false hushed reverential tones now used. The politicians didn't look on it as a photo opportunity to garner votes.

    Overall it was simpler and not overdone, in other words lacked the hype it gets now. look at the footy played on Anzac Day as that is a good demonstration of what hype is all about.
    Adrianus
    20th Apr 2019
    9:06am
    Struth strikey! You hit the nail on the head mate!!
    It makes no sense that 1500 people arrive by boat in 1778 are called invaders, but 50,000 people arrive by boat during Labor's last try of government, and we're told they are refugees?? Crikey, strikey, the whole place has turned upside down.
    TREBOR
    20th Apr 2019
    11:37am
    My first experience was with my grand-father, who had a four digit enlistment number for WW I, then my father and two uncles in WWII - another uncle was considered a lesser being for not serving ... my first boss was at Tobruk (mentioned in Peter Fitzsimons book) and never said anything about it and his sidekick had lost an arm ... nobody 'honoured war' and this was in the 50's and 60's - it was a sad remembrance, with funny stories laughed about but an underlying quietness and reflection.
    Eddy
    19th Apr 2019
    12:41pm
    What does 'overhyped' mean? Commercialized (like Christmas and Easter), jingoistic, politicized, I am not sure. I do not attend the mid-morning marches but I do make a point of attending the local Dawn Service, the 'official' dawn service at the Cenotaph or Shrine (or whatever you call your State memorial) are too orchestrated for me, I like the simplicity of an intimate gathering with minimal organisation. I will always, as long as I am able, attend Dawn Services.
    TREBOR
    20th Apr 2019
    11:40am
    Sh*t happens, as Tony bumbled to the serving troops.... an outsider trying to talk tough.... then there was Howard racing beside a striding Cosgrove and saying "They're a fine body of men, aren't they, Peter?".. to be met with a stony silence, then a grunt and a curt nod...

    Blame the politicos for making it into a circus and trying to catch the coat tails for a free ride.
    Lou
    19th Apr 2019
    1:04pm
    My husband is a Vietnam Veteran. His father served in WWII. There is no glory in war. We attend a service every year. Anzac Day to us is a time to reflect. To remember those who did not come home and those who are still serving. Those who serve and do come home live with the memories forever. The effects are not always obvious to others. Many suffer in silence. So do their families. We should all be proud of service men and women; past, present and future. Their mission is to keep us from harm's way. Our Government must care for these people throughout their lives providing support and assistance whenever needed. DVA pension should not be means tested. If a Veteran has made it through to retirement age then he/she deserves to be rewarded. Wave the flag politicians, but back up your patriotism with real support.
    TREBOR
    20th Apr 2019
    11:45am
    I support the view that every active service man/woman should have a guaranteed minimum income for life - not the dole that many get these days... one day a rooster, the next a feather duster or pimple on the arse of society... no wonder there is so much depression and such and the same old feeling of rejection and being out of synch .... this adds to the problems for active service people, and I call it PSSD - Post Service Separation Disorder, and it is something that doesn't even require active service, but certainly doesn't help.

    Some have even turned to crime to make ends meet.... their pride will not permit them to accept charity.

    We need a VETS - Veterans Employment Transition Service... and some real opportunity in this once-great nation and not just the parceled out nonsense that masquerades as opportunity (but only for selected groups).
    Midge
    19th Apr 2019
    1:05pm
    I go o the local service, and there is a parade. People of all ages attend and march some even wearing a family members medal. I don't think this glorifies war we are really giving thanks to those who went to war and fought, so we could enjoy the lifestyle and freedom we have today. the village I live in lost 17 local boys 3 of them brothers this village was even smaller at that time and that was a huge amount of young men to lose. So I go to the ANZAC Day Service to pay my respects and give thanks for their courage.
    Midge
    19th Apr 2019
    1:05pm
    I go o the local service, and there is a parade. People of all ages attend and march some even wearing a family members medal. I don't think this glorifies war we are really giving thanks to those who went to war and fought, so we could enjoy the lifestyle and freedom we have today. the village I live in lost 17 local boys 3 of them brothers this village was even smaller at that time and that was a huge amount of young men to lose. So I go to the ANZAC Day Service to pay my respects and give thanks for their courage.
    Debe
    19th Apr 2019
    1:20pm
    ANZAC DAY, from my prospective, l remember the fallen and rejoice with the living who returned and respect the day for what it is. Lot of sadness lot of good memories of times served truly a service persons day to remember their mates past and present...We will remember them....
    Digby
    19th Apr 2019
    2:05pm
    As the article says it is a day of commemoration not celebration. It is to remind us of the tragedy of all wars. I shall be at the dawn service in memory of a gay great uncle I never knew ( as I was born long after the war's end, but he was my mother's favourite uncle who was blown to bits by a landmine when landing on a beach in Italy). It always brings back to me to horrors and the waste of all wars, and I am proud to attend in memory of the Anzacs as it because of their sacrifices that I can live the wonderful life that I do now.
    bandy
    19th Apr 2019
    2:22pm
    debe we will remember them
    Farside
    19th Apr 2019
    2:46pm
    I grew up in a RAAF family and have many relatives with war service. Interestingly none of them speak well of the jingoistic, PC event that ANZAC day has become. Perhaps it's because they are curmudgeonly, but I tend to think they regard it as a solemn occasion for remembrance of their fallen comrades and acknowledging the hardships of war. They still go to dawn service and the diggers breakfast and toast friends that have passed since previous ANZAC day.
    tactful
    19th Apr 2019
    4:04pm
    What has been played down for so long was the invasion of Australia by both Japanese and Germans.
    It has never been truthfully discussed, I was never taught about it as school. I only knew because I have a military family and they all spoke about this.
    Perhaps if we did show due respect to our lost service personal, serving members and returned service personal this country would grow and mature showing respect.
    I am quite sure that had both Japan and Germany been successful none of us would be speaking English, this country would have been divided into separate little countries.
    ANZAC DAY is not about glorifying war, it is a time to remember those who gave their lives in the service of this country.
    Their service, their loss of life, those who returned, those who currently serve ALL KEEP US SAFE FROM HARM.
    If you think for one second we are not considered a target, think again, it is our natural resources that are wanted and our labour.
    Those who disagree with ANZAC DAY can only do so because without all the efforts and sacrifice (death) they would not have a voice nor would we be living in Australia or speaking English.
    Perhaps if we stopped and considered what could have been without our Air Force, Navy or Army carrying out their duties.
    A sobering thought is would any of us be here if not for our service personal doing what they did at the time.
    Anonymous
    19th Apr 2019
    5:04pm
    Well said. Bravo!
    Missskinnylegs
    19th Apr 2019
    4:16pm
    Being UK born I never understood ANZAC Day until I lived in NZ and then came to Australia. Watching my first ANZAC parade many years ago I cried and silently thanked all those who went and returned, and those who went and did not return. I wish more foreigners in Australia realised that those ANZACS made Australia what it is today and not try and change it!
    Charlie
    19th Apr 2019
    4:28pm
    I don't like the idea of children wearing the medals of their deceased relatives.

    Also I don't agree with children marching in the ranks of veterans. Schools provide for where children should march.

    You can only go so far to make Anzac a family issue. Families may have suffered in war but they were not there, in the capacity of soldiers.
    Anonymous
    19th Apr 2019
    5:06pm
    I agree 100%. I don't agree with women marching either, unless they were nurses near the front (as my grandmother was in the Somme, WW1).
    Anonymous
    20th Apr 2019
    5:24am
    As a child, I marched every year with other wards of Legacy, proudly wearing my deceased father's medals. I resent your comment, Charlie and Knows-a-lot. All I ever had of my father was his medals and reports of his sacrifice in war to keep this nation free. That ANZAC Day March was a way of honouring a man I never had the privilege of knowing, and of promoting Legacy - a wonderful organization that made sure war orphans had at least some compensation for the loss of their father. They provided firewood and warm coats and paid for spectacles, and my Legatees drove me places and were there with sage advice in times of difficulty and words of comfort in times of grief.

    I will wear those medals again this year, as a salute to the father I never knew. I don't march, but I will participate in other ways in the service of remembrance.

    I have female relatives who march, as they were part of the Land Army. It took many decades for their service to be recognized, but it was a very necessary and valuable service and they deserve to be acknowledged.
    Anonymous
    22nd Apr 2019
    8:37am
    Charlie and Knows a Lot - I fully understand your views but I've no views one way or the other - I'm OK with it - I've spoken with some young guns and been impressed by their knowledge - my grandkids have my medals
    JAID
    24th Apr 2019
    6:40pm
    An understandable view but a child carrying its parent's medals is a special and personal type of memorial. Their gone parents would likely feel honoured that their children valued their contribution.
    hyacinth
    19th Apr 2019
    4:28pm
    I totally agree with Old Man . Your comments, Perth SV, are most offensive. If it hadn't been for our soldiers in the past you would not be able to get on this platform and voice your slanderous opinion. The defence forces today are working to stop terrorism ...a different kind of war.
    They are doing a great job and I thank them for keeping us safe.
    hyacinth
    19th Apr 2019
    4:28pm
    I totally agree with Old Man . Your comments, Perth SV, are most offensive. If it hadn't been for our soldiers in the past you would not be able to get on this platform and voice your slanderous opinion. The defence forces today are working to stop terrorism ...a different kind of war.
    They are doing a great job and I thank them for keeping us safe.
    Dorliz
    19th Apr 2019
    4:49pm
    On Anzac Day, in the Morning, We Will Remember them
    On Anzac Day, in the Afternoon we will Celebrate the Freedoms their sacrifice provided to us, For some a Swim, for some a game of Cricket in the backyard for others a few beers maybe. Not all died some returned but their sacrifice was no less than those who died on the battleground.
    Lest WE Forget
    Anonymous
    22nd Apr 2019
    8:39am
    or as sailors say:
    They have no grave but the cruel sea
    No flowers lay at their head
    A rusting hulk is their tombstone
    A'fast on the ocean bed.
    They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
    Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
    At the going down of the sun and in the morning
    We will remember them.
    LEST WE FORGET
    MD
    19th Apr 2019
    6:12pm
    I'nt it marvellous, that so many readily jump-up to register their patriotism whether by means of association with family members, actual service or sheer bloody mindedness. In the absence of 'gongs' to wear then spriuk your loyalty and patriotism louder than evryone else ? Service men/women aside - the minority perhaps - I seriously wonder how many of the remainder have the vaguest idea of the sheer brutality of war ? All very well for them to pontificate, parrot fashion, the well rehearsed cliches and hyperbole associated with this respective day of remembrance.
    It is a matter of mental expediency that our pollies will us to 'remember them' - it ensures ongoing awareness and (maybe) preparedness for another repeat of past atrocities...mostly at the behest of (and for reasons incomprehensible to the average 'digger') our most loyal and subservient 'masters' !

    By all means, remember the diggers, but first and foremost maybe we have a need to question the motivational forces lying behind this perpetuated day or remembrance ?
    Anonymous
    22nd Apr 2019
    8:43am
    MD - you just don't understand and never will - you should take the time to read why Anzac Day was created in Australia.
    War is abhorrent and we should everything to stop it happening BUT lets truly remember those that paid the ultimate sacrifice so we can have peace and freedom
    80 plus
    19th Apr 2019
    7:22pm
    Well said, I lay a wreath on ANZAC day and on the 11th of November, my father and all my uncles served in world war 2, and I am an ex serviceman, my wreath is a tribute to those who defended our way of life and not a glorification of war.
    DaveL
    19th Apr 2019
    7:48pm
    Lost my dad in wwII, mates in Vietnam. We will remember them, Lest we forget.
    Chicky Dee
    19th Apr 2019
    10:37pm
    I feel even though there certainly is media Hype we are seeing more families attending the Dawn Services etc and young people do have respect for those who have served. There are those who are affected by the post trauma of their service and yes money should be spent on them and not on the big fancy tax payer dollar events the governments hold trying to out do each other from State to State. Given the choice we tax payers would prefer the money to be spent where it is most needed.
    BillF2
    19th Apr 2019
    10:52pm
    Anzac Day should not only be for remembrance of those who served their country and lost their lives, but also of the futility of war. I remember Ian Bogle's (?) plaintive song "And the band played Waltzing Matilda" from the 1970's. It's rarely heard now, yet should be compulsory at every Anzac Day service.
    And when it comes to hypocrisy, nobody ever mentions or criticises the politicians who get us involved in wars, especially illegal ones like Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria. Rather they are given places of honour.
    Farside
    20th Apr 2019
    7:36am
    In my experience those who served would agree with you, the remembrance of the brutality and futility of war has been supplanted by a commemoration and thanksgiving celebration better suited to Remembrance Day.

    and it was Eric Bogle that wrote the song. There are also many good covers of this song.
    Anonymous
    22nd Apr 2019
    8:47am
    For those who are not familiar with the song:

    Now when I was a young man I carried me pack, and I lived the free life of a rover
    From the Murray's green basin to the dusty outback, well, I waltzed my Matilda all over

    Then in 1915, my country said son, it's time you stopped rambling, there's work to be done
    So they gave me a tin hat, and they gave me a gun, and they marched me away to the war
    And the band played Waltzing Matilda, as the ship pulled away from the Quay
    And amidst all the cheers, the flag-waving and tears, we sailed off for Gallipoli
    And how well I remember that terrible day, how our blood stained the sand and the water
    And of how in that hell that they called Suvla Bay, we were butchered like lambs at the slaughter
    Johnny Turk he was waiting, he'd primed himself well, he showered us with bullets
    And he rained us with shell, and in five minutes flat, he'd blown us all straight to hell
    Nearly blew us right back to Australia
    But the band played Waltzing Matilda, when we stopped to bury our slain
    We buried ours, and the Turks buried theirs, then we started all over again
    And those that were left, well we tried to survive, in that mad world of blood, death and fire
    And for ten weary weeks I kept myself alive, though around me the corpses piled higher
    Then a big Turkish shell knocked me arse over head, and when I woke up in my hospital bed
    And saw what it had done, well I wished I was dead: never knew there was worse things than dyin'
    For I'll go no more waltzing Matilda, all around the green bush far and free
    To hang tent and pegs, a man needs both legs-no more waltzing Matilda for me
    So they gathered the crippled, the wounded, the maimed, and they shipped us back home to Australia
    The legless, the armless, the blind, the insane, those proud wounded heroes of Suvla
    And as our ship pulled into Circular Quay, I looked at the place where me legs used to be
    And thanked Christ there was nobody waiting for me, to grieve, to mourn, and to pity
    But the band played Waltzing Matilda, as they carried us down the gangway
    But nobody cheered, they just stood and stared, then they turned all their faces away
    And so now every April, I sit on me porch, and I watch the parades pass before me
    And I see my old comrades, how proudly they march, reviving old dreams of past glories
    And the old men march slowly, old bones stiff and sore, the forgotten heroes of a forgotten war
    And the young people ask, what are they marching for? ...and I ask myself the same question
    But the band plays Waltzing Matilda, and the old men still answer the call
    But as year follows year, more old men disappear, someday no one will march there at all
    "Waltzing Matilda, Waltzing Matilda, who'll come a-waltzing Matilda with me?
    And their ghosts may be heard as they march by that billabong, who'll come a-waltzing Matilda with me?"
    Jennifer
    20th Apr 2019
    1:07am
    I'm a migrant, we came to this beautiful country Australia in 1975 so really we are Australian now as most of our lives have been lived here. For me Anzac Day is a day of quiet reflection, of grateful thanks to the veterans who sacrificed so much to make Australia this wonderful country that accepted us (through the official/legal application process) and that we are privileged to live in. I'm passionate about Australia and the Australian way of life. We are truly blessed to be living in this wonderful homeland.
    Jennifer
    20th Apr 2019
    1:07am
    I'm a migrant, we came to this beautiful country Australia in 1975 so really we are Australian now as most of our lives have been lived here. For me Anzac Day is a day of quiet reflection, of grateful thanks to the veterans who sacrificed so much to make Australia this wonderful country that accepted us (through the official/legal application process) and that we are privileged to live in. I'm passionate about Australia and the Australian way of life. We are truly blessed to be living in this wonderful homeland.
    kamelmusic
    20th Apr 2019
    1:15am
    This is another poorly worded poll question. It is two questions in one, but excludes me! For me, the answers are NO (it hasn't become overhyped) and I LIKE IT (as it is, respectful, multicultural, multi-generational and unifying).
    Raff
    20th Apr 2019
    4:49am
    I respect Anzac Day and always observe it but it I question those speakers who see Gallipoli as our "Baptism of Fire". It wasn't. Our first engagement (as a new nation) took place in German New Guinea 7 months earlier when six Australian military personnel were killed (11 September 1914). Three days later a further 35 naval personnel died when the submarine AE1 went missing
    Cowboy Jim
    20th Apr 2019
    9:39am
    Been to PNG last year, the Australians are still remembered there. Visiting the grave sites there and on Guadalcanal is very moving indeed. The antenna of the German Radio station was still standing. Most Aussies do not know that part of PNG was under the kaiser and think only of the Dutch Indies.
    Aussie
    20th Apr 2019
    11:19am
    We close our children's business on Anzac Day and every year cop abuse from people about what they are going to do with their kids. We tell "do what we do, attend the local dawn service and the march" I wish that the laws would change so no businesses could open in the morning.
    mudGecko
    20th Apr 2019
    1:20pm
    The original question was whether Anzac Day was overhyped... not the right and wrongs of using troops (at Gallipoli, of several nations, as well as homeland soldiers) to invade another country.

    I say yes, of course it is a frantic media flurry, descending at times to utter jingoistic nonsense; it is embarrassing to, and boycotted by, many who actually served in the worst of the front line horrors.

    May I, sincerely, offer this eternal truth for all to consider:

    "Self-praise is never a recommendation."
    Cowboy Jim
    20th Apr 2019
    2:29pm
    A stupid comment, let us remember a great sacrifice. I suppose you'd rather have old Hitler running the show. It's his birthday today. Lest we forget!!
    Farside
    21st Apr 2019
    11:20am
    Just because Cowboy Jim thinks the comment stupid does not make it so.

    I suspect many vets share mudGecko's view "it is embarrassing to, and boycotted by, many who actually served in the worst of the front line horrors.". The vets I know talk little to outsiders about the wars they fought in and eschew the parade celebrations for quiet reflection and remembrance at the local dawn service followed by the diggers' breakfast with fellow vets.
    JAID
    24th Apr 2019
    1:10pm
    "Self-praise is never a recommendation."

    Perhaps the most worthy comment here. Yet, Anzac day is nothing to do with self-praise for me and I think it is largely presented as something beyond that also.
    World Prophet
    20th Apr 2019
    3:52pm
    Anzac Day is an opportunity to reflect on past sacrifices, honour those who served and those who are still serving, and give thanks for the freedom we enjoy as a result of all of the above. It is the one day per year we can do this. Contrast the way serving servicemen are treated in the US with here. A soldier who goes into any restaurant will most likely have his or her meal paid for by the restaurant of a fellow diner. A soldier boarding a flight will often get an upgrade, or have an upgrade seat swap offered by a fellow flyer. And with every acknowledgement of his or her position, it is accompanied by "Thank you for your service". This happens for serving personnel and vets. And it is well deserved.
    Cowboy Jim
    20th Apr 2019
    9:05pm
    Thank you for mentioning that! Even on cruise lines ex service people are getting special recognition, some also give it to ex service personnel from Australia and Canada.

    21st Apr 2019
    6:03am
    In recent years there have been repeated attempts by 'Progressive' (Regressive) Left activists and certain media celebrities to politicise Anzac Day. Their malicious criticism and mocking of Anzac Day and even of a Victoria Cross recipient were thoroughly rejected by the public. An idiot of a PM, Turnbull, should have educated some of the main suspects but he dined with them instead. Most likely the taxpayer footed the bill :(
    The attempts to politicise Anzac Day are just part of the ongoing wider campaign in the media to tear down significant Australian institutions and culture.
    Franky
    21st Apr 2019
    2:29pm
    I can't relate to it at all. We are the only country in the world as far as I know who is celebrating a defeat. Not even fighting for Australia but a foreign country on foreign soil. Paul Keating had it right, if we celebrate it should be at Kokoda. That was a heroic battle to keep the Japanese at bay.
    Anonymous
    22nd Apr 2019
    8:51am
    Franky - we were still British in 1914 but your right about Kokoda.
    Adrianus
    22nd Apr 2019
    10:51am
    I doubt very much that war battles are a reason for celebration of defeat or victory. The ceremony is a recognition to those who fought the battles and serves as a reminder that there are no victors. Would we do it again? Yes, for the right reasons.
    Adrianus
    22nd Apr 2019
    10:51am
    I doubt very much that war battles are a reason for celebration of defeat or victory. The ceremony is a recognition to those who fought the battles and serves as a reminder that there are no victors. Would we do it again? Yes, for the right reasons.

    22nd Apr 2019
    12:59pm
    My late father a WW2 veteran never joined the RSL and never went to an Anzac Day ceremony. I never asked why and he never said.
    Farside
    22nd Apr 2019
    1:33pm
    There are many vets like your late father who have no time for the RSL or going to Anzac Day ceremonies or talking about their war experiences. Many like my grandfather just wanted to put it behind them and move on as best they could even when their injuries were a constant reminder.
    JAID
    24th Apr 2019
    1:07pm
    I have had family with similar feelings but that does not mean we cannot acknowledge our debt to them.
    danielboonjp
    24th Apr 2019
    10:51am
    a photo shoot opportunity for the same people who send you off to war
    what not George Pell and his victimes too?
    JAID
    24th Apr 2019
    1:04pm
    Good comment Leon,
    I strongly support Anzac day however. There are two primary reasons.

    We will always owe our present to the sacrifice given. Yes there are innumerable other reasons we are what we are but all should know that where people seriously put there lives on the line for the common good they will not be forgotten.

    The second follows from that. We do not want to solve differences through war but the world has not changed so much yet that we can expect to do that without preparedness to back up the positions integrity suggests. Jingoism is intolerable because it is superficial but we are part of an independent, free-thinking nation which should exist as one example for others.

    When the world comes to be able to deal with opinion and need appropriately, in the best and most humane interests of all, borders will dissolve since there will be no need for them. Until then, military awareness and preparedness is a necessary form of defence. Anzac day helps keep that even in superficial minds.
    maxchugg
    25th Apr 2019
    10:57am
    I remember going to the pictures with my mother around 1943 because there was a show being screened about the war in New Guinea where my father and a couple of uncles were at the time. I knew that my mother was quietly worried, although no explanation was given, I now know that there was a fear that the war in New Guinea was not going well, the propaganda reports notwithstanding, There was also an awareness that if the battle was lost in New Guinea, invasion of Australia would follow – fortress Singapore had fallen and we were on our own as far as Churchill was concerned, he wanted to win in Europe first and retake Australia later.

    Hopes were raised after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour which brought the United States into the war and the combined US/Australian victory in the Battle of the Coral Sea, followed by Curtin’s defiance of Churchill in returning troops from the Middle East to fight in New Guinea. Eventually the extreme gallantry of our troops in New Guinea who eventually defeated the Japanese in new Guinea, despite the incompetence and criminal neglect they received from MacArthur and our own General Blamey was to raise hopes higher.

    From that time forward I have always had the utmost respect for our servicemen, had it not been for them, I shudder to think what Australia would be like today. It is encouraging to see that our young people are showing interest in the Anzac Day celebrations, yet there is also cause for concern at the way in which our freedom appears to be no longer the matter of concern it was during the days of WW2 and national pride appears to be extinct.
    maxchugg
    25th Apr 2019
    10:57am
    I remember going to the pictures with my mother around 1943 because there was a show being screened about the war in New Guinea where my father and a couple of uncles were at the time. I knew that my mother was quietly worried, although no explanation was given, I now know that there was a fear that the war in New Guinea was not going well, the propaganda reports notwithstanding, There was also an awareness that if the battle was lost in New Guinea, invasion of Australia would follow – fortress Singapore had fallen and we were on our own as far as Churchill was concerned, he wanted to win in Europe first and retake Australia later.

    Hopes were raised after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbour which brought the United States into the war and the combined US/Australian victory in the Battle of the Coral Sea, followed by Curtin’s defiance of Churchill in returning troops from the Middle East to fight in New Guinea. Eventually the extreme gallantry of our troops in New Guinea who eventually defeated the Japanese in new Guinea, despite the incompetence and criminal neglect they received from MacArthur and our own General Blamey was to raise hopes higher.

    From that time forward I have always had the utmost respect for our servicemen, had it not been for them, I shudder to think what Australia would be like today. It is encouraging to see that our young people are showing interest in the Anzac Day celebrations, yet there is also cause for concern at the way in which our freedom appears to be no longer the matter of concern it was during the days of WW2 and national pride appears to be extinct.
    Bottle-O-Rum
    25th Apr 2019
    2:51pm
    I am a veteran who puts great value on the commemoration. That value includes reinforcing to young and old alike that it all could happen again with incautious and/or negligent governments.
    Lest we forget.