The rate of homeless people who are seniors has risen

Australia's rate of homelessness is now almost on par with Britain.

The rate of homeless people who are seniors has risen

In the past five years, the rate of Australians aged 65 and over who have become homeless has grown from 25 in 10,000 people to 27, according to 2016 Census analysis released this week.

Australia’s rate of homelessness has now climbed to be almost on par with the UK’s, with about one in every 200 people having no fixed address.

On Census night, 116,427 people described themselves as homeless, a figure that was 13.7 per cent higher than the previous survey, said the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS).

The new data prompted Mission Australia chief executive James Toomey to label the figures an “international embarrassment”, which he said was caused by a lack of national political commitment to building more social housing and affordable homes.

Out of a population of around 24 million, Australia’s homelessness rate is 0.48 per cent, which while comparable to Britain’s 0.5 per cent, is much higher than rates in the US and Ireland, which are just 0.17 per cent each.

In fact, Australia has a much larger number of homeless people proportionate to the population compared with many countries.

European countries such as Italy (0.08%) and Greece (0.2%), have lower rates of homelessness than Australia. India and China have rates of 0.2 per cent or less, and Japan’s figure is a tiny 0.005 per cent.

Professor Guy Johnson, of the Urban Housing and Homelessness unit at RMIT, told YourLifeChoices that not too much should be read into measurements against other countries.

“It’s hard to compare rates when different places count homelessness differently,” he said.

“Many people in India for instance would be counted as homeless if a similar definition to what we use here was applied.”

The ABS General Manager of Population and Social Statistics, Dr Paul Jelfs, said in a statement that “while there was an overall increase in the estimate of homelessness in Australia, this number was made up of various distinct groups and each tells a different story’’.

Some 8200 of the more than 116,000 self-described homeless people were sleeping rough on Census night, which was down six per cent on the previous period. The biggest category, at  over 51,000, said they were sleeping in overcrowded houses. More than 38,700 were living in boarding houses or other accommodation for the homeless, and 17,700 were temporarily staying in other people’s homes.

Have you ever had a close brush with homelessness? Do you think more social housing needs to be built? Has the Government done enough to help the homeless?

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    COMMENTS

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    jackie
    16th Mar 2018
    10:35am
    This is disgusting. High rents are to blame for this as well as the lack of care for the mentally ill. Australia needs more rooming houses to accommodate them instead of looking after the land developers.
    AutumnOz
    16th Mar 2018
    11:35am
    After the death of my grandmother my grandfather and father lived in a boarding house until Dad married.
    There used to be a lot of boarding houses when I first started working in Sydney the late 1960s, these provided a room plus breakfast and dinner at night, they gave security and also allowed people to save money instead of having to rent a two or three bedroom house and then let out a room in that house to afford the rent.
    Somewhere along the line the rules and regulations have taken a wrong turn and now there are very few places people can rent a single room which is affordable.
    Rae
    16th Mar 2018
    12:57pm
    Yes Autumn. I grew up in a boarding house in Sydney through the 50s and into the 60s. It was a terrific way for the home owner to pay the mortgage and provided accomodation.

    I think it might be reasonable for some of the thousands of motels to be purchased in regions for providing accomodation to the homeless. There would have to be a manager couple employed to oversee this and services to support them.

    With the cost of holidays now I'm sure a lot of motels must be struggling and would welcome a sale to the government.

    We also possibly need more hospitals to cope with the mental health crisis we seem to have developed here.
    HarrysOpinion
    16th Mar 2018
    1:30pm
    The high rents keep the unsavoury renters out. Too many historical cases of renters abusing and wrecking rented accomodation. A high cost of repairs to landlords. Boarding house rooms are rented by drug addicts, alcoholics and the violent mentally ill. Also rented by
    single "economic refugees" who are not only on govt welfare but have part time or full time work as well as their own cars.
    I know of one mentally ill woman in Sydney who rented a room in a boarding house and instead of disposing her rubbish to the garbage bin outside, piled the rubbish in plastic bags in her room to the point where the piles reached waist high filling the entire room. She then absconded owing a months rent. On top of it it cost the landlord $500 to clear out the filth and 3 weeks to air the room of the stench. Lo and behold, two months later the woman's photograph and a story appeared in a local charity mag how difficult it was for this woman to find accommodation and how she seemed to be discriminated against but nothing about her filthy deeds.
    A " economic refugee" from mid-east on govt welfare, part time work , his own car, waiting for approval from Sweden to migrate there to join his girlfriend. Using Australia as a means of bludging income from govt welfare for his real motive in life to prosper his travels.
    A mentally ill man in his mid 30s, acute schitz, drug addict,with a criminal record for stealing cars in ACT would get into violent fits and violently smash the furniture in his room yelling out loud abuse at god how badly he has been treated by life but no concern that he was creating alarming concern and fear by his violence for other residents.
    A Pacific Islander, alcoholic,would dirty the common kitchen time after time after it was cleaned by the caretaker dropping food stuff on the floor and stomping on it so particle embedded on the floor tiles.
    A unknown resident in a boarding house used the shower to defecate himself leaving the mess for the caretaker to clean up.
    A Pacific Islander, drug addict and drug dealer intimidated other residents to buy drugs from him, if they didn't buy, he would violently bash them up.
    A man in his 20s from NZ, worked as painter. Ice user would react violently to other residents.
    A couple in early 30s rented a room solely for cooking up heroin shooting up.
    There are thousands untold stories about unsavoury residents of boarding house rooms, these are just some of them.
    And you wonder why landlords charge high room rent?
    In boarding homes the landlord pays for the council rates, water and sewerage rates, electricity and gas costs,safety maintenance costs, the supply of furniture including bedding , fees to R/E property management agent and hefty insurance premiums.
    How much would you charge for a room knowing all the costs and the damage renters do?
    Come on...put a price on it!
    The rules and regulations may have changed somewhat but what has really predominantly changed renter's character to commit reckless evil.
    Rae
    16th Mar 2018
    4:08pm
    That is awful HS.

    My memories of the boarding house were all great. It was spotless and the meals were a lot of fun. As the only child I was very happy there and everyone was polite, well mannered and clean.

    Things have gone downhill very fast haven't they.
    MICK
    16th Mar 2018
    6:32pm
    HS: welcome to being a landlord. The people business may appear to be wonderful and profitable but apart from the wonderful handful of renters it's a hard slog and makes a dent in one's perception of human nature. I see it has likely ruined you.

    The issue at hand is 'homelessness' and Australia has joined the rest of the western world declaring a war on those who for whatever reason cannot or will not have sufficient money to survive. There all colours out there. The thing that should be clear in our minds though is that our governments have gotten out of public housing and forced the destitute and incapable to fend for themselves. At the same time these governments have not touched the mechanisms which helped to force up the price of housing: negative gearing. The result is first home buyers find it nigh well impossible to own a house and the poor never will.

    I would like to see governments build public housing again as it is obscene that a country like ours which burns money on so called refugees (=immigrants) has no money to provide for the destitute. Of course expect the well heeled to object because they want high rents and they want negative gearing. Both need to be regulated. Until then expect more Australians to be acceptable discards in this cruel game of life. That is how the top end of society operates.
    TREBOR
    17th Mar 2018
    12:51am
    Couldn't have said it better myself.
    The Bronze Anzac
    17th Mar 2018
    9:47am
    I think it would be interesting to know the breakup of the ABS figures in relation to (a) age groups, (b) gender, & (c) ethnic groups, as these would help identify those in need of priority help.

    16th Mar 2018
    10:51am
    Where I live we have a fair number but unfortunately, even though they are getting quite a bit of money thru pensions they prefer to live in old cars and spend the money on ciggies,
    booze and gambling. Having closed all the mental homes has also added to the problem and that might have to be looked at again. I know that mental care accommodation is not sexy in these enlightened times but neither is the sight of dishevelled people lying in doorways every morning. Renting costs are a secondary concern if you do not even want to pay $100 a week. I do not live in a posh area and see these people daily.
    David
    16th Mar 2018
    10:53am
    I do not deny that homelessness is a problem, and that most homeless people are victims of circumstances, and would prefer not to be homeless.
    However, some actually choose this option. If in a permanent home they have obligations to maintain the home, and if sharing with others they have no choice as to who these others are. On the other hand, some prefer to live in a "community" of homeless people as it brings them a feeling of "belonging", "friendship" and "connection" with others, which they do not experience otherwise. These feelings are, to some, more important than having a soft bed at night and all the other comforts of a place to call home. Loneliness in your own home is often worse than sleeping rough with others in that "community".
    Ironman162
    16th Mar 2018
    12:10pm
    Well said David!
    You have a good point there, loneliness is a factor that is often overlooked especially if someone does not fit the social mould too well.
    Added to that is the older you get the more transparent you are. Ultimately there is no room in society for you and you gravitate to where you fit best.
    Rae
    16th Mar 2018
    1:06pm
    Yes David. I was in the US in 2009 and there were thousands on the streets.

    It was well organised though for those not mentally ill.

    People were not looked down on and surprisingly the supermarkets stepped in to provide cheap food from bistro type food bars inside the stores and also provided extra security for the carparks and porta loos.

    I spoke to a lot of people and they were there because their investor landlord had lost the investment property they were renting or they'd lost everything by investing in the housing boom.
    It could happen here.

    Gyms had $9 memberships that provided showering.

    It was sad but there was some help through this and people were helping themselves and others.
    There was a sense of camaraderie and all in this together going on.

    We tend to rely on government who are not helping at all apparently.

    Maybe soon time to start organising ourselves like the yanks have to as they have never been able to rely on their government for welfare.
    floss
    16th Mar 2018
    10:56am
    It is not the country I was bought up in the gap between the have and the have nots is far to great and the Labor party that once look after the worker and the weak are now just a cheap copy of the Libs.I really feel for people that are homeless through no fault of their own.
    Ted Wards
    16th Mar 2018
    11:27am
    We have a very real solution here in Brisbane but no one will undertake it. We have a glut of new multipurpose buildings that they cannot sell the apartments and no one is getting any income. Why cant we match homeless to the empty units as they will get an aged pension once they have a permanent address and at least reduced rental is better than no rental income.
    Anonymous
    16th Mar 2018
    11:35am
    Wish you luck Ted, trying to sell those apartments after you let homeless people live in them. Maybe you live in a nice area in Brisbane; I did 11 years in Spring Hill and saw the great unwashed every day. You do not need a permanent address to get the Age Pension, the ones I know here on the NSW north coast have a pension and quite a few have a car but as David above mentioned, they prefer sleeping rough in a "community".
    Rae
    16th Mar 2018
    1:11pm
    Would be better to use halls and public spaces and provide stretcher bedding. Someone would have to organise this plus food. It seems government won't.

    It would have to be set up each night and packed away. There would be rules which the homeless aren't often good about. Showering and toilets.

    Even tents in parks.

    We seem capable of providing for refugees in far off lands but not our own.
    KSS
    16th Mar 2018
    1:23pm
    So why are you not doing it Rae instead of waiting for 'someone'?
    Rae
    16th Mar 2018
    4:12pm
    I'm expecting we'll have to KSS. At the moment our local charities are coping and I am donating money. If my time is needed I'm sure they'll let me know.

    As for fighting government I've done my bit there as well. It's like slamming into a brick wall over and over.

    It needs an established group with links and some funding avenues.
    AutumnOz
    16th Mar 2018
    11:29am
    It is a disgrace that so many of Australia's people are living rough, some of this is attributable to the closing of mental hospitals and other live in facilities for those unable to care for themselves.
    However, some of the regulations passed by both state and federal gov't departments prevents people from offering a spare room to people in need. It is just too expensive to provided the extras needed to do so these days.
    When I was young we often had a relative or friend living with us for a few months or years until they 'found their feet' and were able to afford their own flat or house.
    Anonymous
    16th Mar 2018
    11:38am
    A rather large problem I noticed is that the people will not take their medicines prescribed for them once they are sleeping rough and you
    find a lot of funny behaviour like shouting and screaming for apparently no reason.
    Ironman162
    16th Mar 2018
    11:57am
    It's surpringly easier to become homeless than to get out of it.
    Ask yourself what you would do if you are too old to get a job, Centerlink refuses you a pension and you have sold just about everything of value to pay your credit card account.
    It's real, it happens and it's not the fault of the Government. A GFC or bad investment can wipe your super over night!
    TREBOR
    16th Mar 2018
    1:02pm
    I know - I was there at 50 or so - and climbed back on my feet again.

    Damned hard, and not for the faint-hearted.
    tisme
    16th Mar 2018
    11:57am
    my mother is in hospital awaiting nursing home placement for dementia , that leaves me her carer and my autistic daughter facing homelessness. we cant afford 700.00 per fortnight rent have no money to move etc all these years of caring for family and others saving the government millions and this it the thanks I get in a lucky country
    Rae
    16th Mar 2018
    1:18pm
    I didn't think they could force you out of the family home if you are a dependent. It sounds as if you are a dependent of your mother. You need to seek legal advice from the local courthouse or similar.

    Don't sign anything until you do.

    Don't wait go get advice straight away. Even the JP at the library will be able to tell you where to go for help.
    Rae
    16th Mar 2018
    1:23pm
    At least 10% of nursing home placement is covered by the taxpayer and there is no bond. Your family may very well fit into this group.

    You'll need to see Centrelink anyway but I'd be also seeing your local member for parliament or anyone who can help you in this stressful time.

    Good luck.
    Brissiegirl
    16th Mar 2018
    5:24pm
    tisme, if you have been living with your mum I doubt you can be turfed out of her home. She would be entitled to nursing home care without selling her home if it is shared by a family member or a carer but I don't know what the qualifying time to be categorised as a dependant is, but check it out. You can probably get a lot of information about this online. Best of luck.
    cupoftea
    16th Mar 2018
    12:11pm
    Jackie you are so right I lived in a boarding house I payed for the room there was a communal kitchen I was on the dole (Centrelink) but I had a roof over my head
    thommo
    16th Mar 2018
    12:13pm
    Our governments, both federal and state, are responsible for this disgraceful situation. People give to charities but they alone can't fix the problem. only our governments can, but they're more concerned about looking after the rich and big end of town to have any compassion or empathy for the poor. Our politicians are a disgusting bunch of morons...
    Anonymous
    16th Mar 2018
    2:52pm
    ... particularly the Lieberal vermin.
    Triss
    16th Mar 2018
    12:25pm
    This illustrates why the family home should never be assessed for pensions. If pensioners are forced into selling their homes to move to a smaller, cheaper place it becomes a downward spiral. The cheaper home will also appreciate in value so the pensioner has to move, again and again until in the end they're forced out of the housing market and become homeless.
    Focusing on one section of the community is not an intelligent way to go.
    Tib
    16th Mar 2018
    1:11pm
    I agree assessing the family home will drive people to sell their homes. It will be sell or starve. Till they have nothing left. It's just plain wrong. That's why I think people who support it are just mean spirited.
    TREBOR
    16th Mar 2018
    1:43pm
    Those people who advocate this atrocity know full well what they are doing, Tib - they're called sociopaths, and they've lost all touch with humanity.
    TREBOR
    16th Mar 2018
    12:55pm
    When you are a big chunk of the dirty third world, the beggars are some of the scenery...

    Besides, the guv wants to slap the family home in as an asset for pensioners as a way of forcing them to expend their assets to eat, and soon many such will have no assets at all and will join the crowds under the awnings and bridges.

    It could get so bad the rich business people will have to boot them aside to get into their ivory towers....
    Tib
    16th Mar 2018
    1:06pm
    There seems to be a broadening of the definition of homeless, probably to make women look more needy. I lived in a boarding house when I was a young man and I didn't consider myself homeless, nor would I have considered living temporary at someone else's house homeless , I think we have all done that. As far as living in overcrowded housing is concerned , that's a choice , the pension still allows you to share a three bedroom house with three people which gives you all a room and reduces costs. And before you say you don't want to do that , if you don't have money hard choices need to be made , so grow up. I have seen women who consider themselves homeless making demands for housing that has rooms for grandchildren when they visit and hobbies and no end of special treatment. I can guarantee these women aren't sleeping rough and their sense of entitlement is ridiculous. My definition of homeless is sleeping rough and sleeping outside and it's mostly men. As far as the rest of you are concerned, grow up you're not homeless you're just not getting everything you want your way.
    TREBOR
    16th Mar 2018
    1:18pm
    You are correct - you are regarded as homeless if you are staying with friends/relatives short term, are in temporary homing and so forth -and women get immediate priority in all areas including funding.

    http://www.abc.net.au/news/2016-02-11/fact-check-do-women-sleeping-rough-outnumber-army-soldiers/7132982
    Tib
    16th Mar 2018
    1:29pm
    Thanks Trebor the ABC article shows this BS for what it is, BS.
    Knight Templar
    16th Mar 2018
    2:15pm
    Tib, You are right. The ABS estimates for Census night 2011, show that 59% of people aged 18 or over, counted as experiencing homelessness, were men. However, while more males were homeless, the majority of homeless people supported by specialist homelessness services were female. Approximately 68 percent of males sleep rough compared with 33 percent females.
    Tib
    16th Mar 2018
    2:28pm
    It's just another silly feminist game to get more preferential treatment for women instead of treating homelessness fairly and getting the real homeless the support they need. Broadening definitions until women look the most needy is a common trick used by feminists to suck up every support dollar ,instead of the money being used to support the real needy in our community. You will find it in mental health and the like as well, it will always end in men getting no support. Claiming everything is a gender issue is another one, which never happens when men are the most disadvantaged. It's disgusting behaviour but all to common.
    Triss
    16th Mar 2018
    2:39pm
    Women are given homes first because, unfortunately, and you can research the truth of this, they are vulnerable to attack by males if they sleep rough.
    Anonymous
    16th Mar 2018
    2:55pm
    @TREBOR & Triss

    "and women get immediate priority in all areas including funding."

    Disgusting, given that most of the homeless are MEN. Gender equality? It's a LIE.
    Triss
    16th Mar 2018
    3:09pm
    Perhaps if homeless males practised gender equality instead of thinking that women were fair game, it wouldn’t be necessary for women to get safely housed first.
    Knight Templar
    16th Mar 2018
    3:59pm
    Triss men die at a younger age than women and have higher mortality rates from cardiac arrest and strokes. Additionally, more men are now dying of prostate cancer then women with breast cancer. Despite these facts, the bulk of health funding goes to women's health.

    The reality is that regardless of whether women are 'fair game' as you put it, women are invariably treated more favourably than men, regardless of merit, particularly in relation to health matters and the justice system. Men throughout history have been little short of cannon fodder!
    Tib
    16th Mar 2018
    4:11pm
    Triss all people who sleep rough are in danger from one source or another to use this as an excuse for preferential treatment is ridiculous. How safe do you think anyone is sleeping behind a dumpster. So stop trying to think up silly reasons why women should get all the support.
    You think they should be practicing gender equality behind the dumpster. Ha ha you must be a feminist that is just too stupid to believe.
    TREBOR
    16th Mar 2018
    7:31pm
    I have no real objection to women getting first call rather than be exposed to the potential nasty side of the street life... only the very far gone women actually sleep rough,and that is often due to mental health issues.

    Government has a lot to answer for selling off the psychiatric institutions for a few dollars.

    I'm fond of the end scene from Fargo - where Margie says to Peter Stormare - "There's more to life than a bit of money. (pause) Don't you know that?"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmoYpJIUWhY
    Tib
    16th Mar 2018
    8:08pm
    Trebor it's only the far gone men that sleep rough as well and they deserve the same care and compassion as women , it's only women that think that men deserve less , but we shouldn't.
    KSS
    16th Mar 2018
    1:36pm
    There is a growing number of youth homelessness too in these figures. Aided and abetted by Centrelink, kids who don't like the rules at home simply up and leave, doss down at a mate's house before they get centrelink payments to enable them to stay away. Meanwhile the parents have no rights, centrelink will not tell parents where their child is citing privacy legislation even when the child is under 16 never mind 18. Then if the child claims abuse ( eg the parents told them no, or heaven forbid wanted them to do household chores) then Centrelink will inform child services who then investigate unnecessarily which not only takes months but can cause irreparable damage as well as taking services away from those in desperate need.
    ray from Bondi
    16th Mar 2018
    2:34pm
    Jackie, you mention the mentally ill and you are so right, governments have turned their back on the care of its citizens, they were chucked out of comfortable safe though their freedoms may have been negligible in those hospitals and do not get going on the empty lies of follow up care. The high cost of housing is also a factor, who can afford to spend 3/4 of their wage on second-rate housing. I know the governments answer it is their fault they should have been millionaires so we do not have to do anything except ensure the trogh is full and brimming with goodies.

    16th Mar 2018
    2:49pm
    Greed and the Lieberal-Hillbilly COALition government are to blame for this. Also, the article fails to note that an overwhelming percentage of homeless people are MEN - the Disposable Sex. If it were women, there would be repeated squawking ad nauseum.
    Anonymous
    16th Mar 2018
    3:29pm
    Yeah, lots of men with no teeth and quite a smell about them. I suppose women know how to look after themselves better and so you will have better reports about them.
    Tib
    16th Mar 2018
    4:20pm
    Cowboy Jim I've seen quite a few women with no teeth and a smell about them. :)
    Sadie
    16th Mar 2018
    5:48pm
    It is way past time the Government helped to look after these people BEFORE giving SOO much Aid overseas!
    Sundays
    16th Mar 2018
    5:55pm
    We definitely need more social housing but Governments have opted out years ago. Aged Pensioners in Housing Commission count your lucky stars. Anyone else trying to rent is doing it tough. I think that share accommodation is the answer
    Elizzy
    16th Mar 2018
    6:09pm
    I think an increase in the supply of co-housing for young people starting work life, for retirees, and for people with care needs could go a long way to alleviating homelessness. Co-housing is better than a boarding house but not as financially restrictive as a retirement village or a classic house mortgage. Google 'co-housing UK and Denmark '.
    TREBOR
    16th Mar 2018
    7:22pm
    Interestingly, I just dropped off a homeless guy I gave a lift... yes - I still do that in this day and age - he's on a waiting list for a bed-sitter, been there three years and the list is at least ten years long. He bit me for my loose change - I had about $3...

    He'd seen the Sydney and Malbun violent places, and headed for the bush again... Byron Bay.

    The annual migration of the homeless to warmer climes has begun.
    TREBOR
    16th Mar 2018
    7:35pm
    We're about to get dinner on the table - might be taking him a plate of roast beef and stuff.... I know where he's sleeping tonight.

    I once said to an old Digger mate, when I was in my homeless time - that once I was paid to sleep under trees in the rain... now I got to do it for free.
    Tib
    16th Mar 2018
    8:18pm
    If what you say is true you shouldn't immediately assume that a woman who ihas seen mild inconvenience should be first in line for support before a mate who has risked his life for his country. I assure you most of these woman would give no consideration to you. Only for herself.
    TREBOR
    17th Mar 2018
    6:20pm
    I try to remain fair and impartial and to some extent chivalrous.... hard when there's been a government initiated and sponsored brushfire war between man and women for forty years no....
    Tib
    17th Mar 2018
    10:16pm
    Trebor I would not like to see a man sleeping rough just because a woman didn't like her accomodation in a boarding house ,she gets first pick because she is considered homeless. This bushfire war was not started by government it was started by feminists. These feminists groups are incredibly powerful, they receive government funds which they use to support political parties which gives them more power. They have been treating men like the enemy since the 70s and if anything they are getting worse. It's chivalry that got us into this mess. Men look after women , women look after women and no one looks after men, and if it's a war their winning. But the more vile they are the less support they get from men. They don't want chivalry ......done.
    Jezemeg8
    16th Mar 2018
    9:06pm
    I keep myself busy most nights by packing up my mobility scooter, putting my two furry companions into their pet slings either side of my body and heading out to be with our friends among the street folk and homeless. YES, I know there is little that I can do to help them, me being a single person on a very limited income, but doing SOMETHING is always far better than sitting 'twiddling one's thumbs' and ending up doing NOTHING! If nothing else I can help someone struggling with their literacy skills, or a mum trying to cope with having no shelter whilst raising her children as best she can, or offer friendship to all who wish to accept my friendship. There is a widespread belief that being homeless means one has no job, therefore can be relocated to anywhere with no problem. Unfortunately those who have jobs don't tell anyone they have nowhere to live, because to do so more often than not results in one losing that very job. There is also a widely held belief that those who are homeless are responsible for the rising crime rate, whereas in reality the homeless are often the victims of crime not the perpetrators. I know recently I was with a group of friends, enjoying some time together and we were mugged, our shoes demanded and as our lives are worth far more than our shoes we surrendered them. The friends I was with didn't want to call the police, as they said in all likelihood nothing would eventuate anyway and they might end up in gaol themselves even though they'd done nothing wrong.
    Yes there are rising numbers of older people becoming homeless for a variety of reasons, but it seems our Governments local, state and federal are far more interested in splashing millions on more sports stadiums etc rather than addressing the issue of homelessness.
    TREBOR
    17th Mar 2018
    6:21pm
    Bread and circuses - you have to provide a decent forum for the gladiators...
    The Bronze Anzac
    17th Mar 2018
    9:30am
    I would like to know how the ABS obtain their figures, especially those who are over 65 years, as most of these "homeless" people have no fixed address, & therefore do not qualify for the aged pension. These homeless would not have received the census papers. I believe that many of our homeless choose that lifestyle, with most being called vagrants, beggars, vagabonds, tramps, paupers, hobos, scroungers, & even able bodied bludgers. Can anyone enlighten me regarding my question on the ABS figures & the census ?
    Lyn
    17th Mar 2018
    12:57pm
    When I was living in StKilda (Vic) 20 years ago there were several well serviced boarding houses for itinerant and homeless people, and they were affordabvle.
    it is disgraceful in our country that the cost of housing and renting is beyond many people.
    There are many young people who cannot get permanent or full time work and then find it difficult to obtain a mortgage from a bank to buy a house. There is now a shortage of housing, and in some states land lords actually auction the rental property to the highest bidder forcing rents up even higher. This greedy society is pushing people into homelessness. Also our governments could do more to provide cheaper accommodation for the homeless.
    Anonymous
    18th Mar 2018
    12:14pm
    Lyn - I remember the boarding houses in St Kilda well, stayed in them at the beginning of my Australian life, were comfortable but not flash. Unfortunately we have become a bit too fussy to start at the bottom these days. Also, the insurance premiums and the new laws make it impossible to run places like that. An owner of one here in Brisbane told me that the tenants take the batteries out of the smoke detectors and he had to pay a fine after inspection by the fire brigade. Suppose that will take the fun out of being host.