A highly paid job is the first step to owning a home

Liberal MP gives his advice to help young people achieve home ownership.

Michael-Sukkar-speaking-in-parliament

It’s no surprise to anyone that a “highly paid job” is the “first step” to owning your own home. That’s the ground breaking advice given by Victorian Federal Liberal MP Michael Sukkar in a statement about tackling the nation’s housing affordability problems.

Mr Sukkar’s comment echoes the highly-criticised advice of former treasurer Joe Hockey from June 2015, when he suggested Australians wanting to buy their first home should “get a good job that pays good money”.

Mr Sukkar, a former taxation lawyer and Assistant Minister to the Treasurer, is responsible for designing the Government’s policy on housing affordability. In a statement on Monday night, Mr Sukkar said the Government was doing what it could to help young people get their foot in the door of home ownership.

“We’re also enabling young people to get highly-paid jobs, which is the first step to buying a house.

“It’s not the only answer, but it’s the first step and I think this idea that we’re arguing for corporate tax cuts because somehow we love big corporates is absolutely ridiculous,” he said.

“We’re for corporate tax cuts because I want to see young people like me, leave university, I was a terrible university student but I left university because the economy was so good.

The newly-appointed Assistant Minister pointed to his own experience in purchasing property. As he mentioned, he currently has two mortgages: a “Canberra investment property” and another residence.

 “I got a great start and I was able to forge a career. But now if we don’t have that investment coming into our country those opportunities will dry up for really excellent young Australians,” he said.

Mr Sukkar said the Coalition had no plan to reduce the capital gains tax discount.

“If you cap negative gearing and you reduce the discount in the way Labor’s proposed, you suck investment out of residential property which means you make it harder for first-home buyers, more expensive for renters and you ultimately reduce jobs in residential construction,” Mr Sukkar said.

Labor MP Tim Watts has criticised Mr Sukkar’s comments, posting a comment on Twitter saying that the Coalition was “back to where Joe Hockey started on housing affordability”.

While the average wage in Australia is $78,832 per year, MPs such as Mr Sukkar are paid a base salary of $199,040 per year. He also receives the $273-per-day taxpayer-funded living allowance, and lives in a one-bedroom flat while attending Parliament. Mr Sukkar is among many Federal MPs using their top-up perks to assist paying off supplementary investment properties.

Read more at theaustralian.com.au

Read more at theage.com.au

Opinion: Are you sufficiently confused yet?

In December last year, the Government released its findings on a 20-month inquiry into housing affordability, and reported that there was no structural issue (pardon the pun) with housing affordability.

The finding stated: “The committee notes that rates of home ownership and investment in housing have remained broadly steady for many decades and that the current price cycle in the housing market across the nation overall is not inconsistent with historical trends.”

At the time, many people, including the Grattan Institute Chief Executive John Daley, criticised the findings, along with the Government’s failure to provide recommendations.

“They cannot be serious. It's laughable. There's clearly a housing affordability problem for younger households,” he said.

This report came just 18 months after Joe Hockey’s infamous 2015 comment: “get a good job that pays good money” if you want to buy a house.

At the time when Mr Hockey made this comment, Sydney was experiencing some of its worst housing affordability problems to date. Mr Hockey was criticised for being out of touch with regular Australians, particularly when he said that, “if housing were unaffordable in Sydney, no one would be buying it”.

Last year, the Government ruled that housing affordability was a non-issue. Now with Mr Sukkar’s comments, it seems housing affordability is a real issue again – at least in the country's major cities. Why can’t the Government make up its mind long enough to formulate effective real policies that stick?

While writing this piece (at my job, which means I can write for living but not be a homeowner), it was challenging to find many concrete recommendations that Mr Sukkar had to put forward. However, he did make the vague suggestion that the Libs would “pull the levers” required “to increase supply and to put downward pressure on prices,” all while managing to make a well-timed dig at the Labor Party.

“Labor’s view is that you limit demand for housing, you ration housing; their negative gearing policy is that you ration housing like you rationed sugar in the Second World War. It is not going to work.

“Our approach, which is my instinctive approach, is you pull the levers you need to increase supply and to put downward pressure on prices.”

Mr Sukkar said he would reveal more about the government’s policies on housing affordability over the next few months – then had one final dig at the Opposition.

“And at the same time I will be seeking to highlight why Labor’s negative gearing policy­ will be ineffective in dealing with this issue,” he said.

In summary, what we have learned is that housing affordability is an issue (again), you’re going to need to cough up a lot of money to buy a house in the east coast capital cities, and Labor, apparently, is still the pits.

Tell us something that we don’t know, fellas.

Why won’t the Government stop seesawing on housing affordability and produce a solid policy? Does Mr Sukkar’s suggestion that prospective home owners get higher paying jobs reveal that he, like Joe Hockey, is out of touch with the average Australian? Should we even be encouraging private homeownership anymore, or is there another way to house people?

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    COMMENTS

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    jennyc355
    22nd Feb 2017
    10:32am
    Well that would be great if we could get a high paying job....but hey 59 yrs old .raised a family and looked after home now on New start...guess what no experience and in late 50's , its hard to find a high paying job ....
    musicveg
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:40pm
    or even a low paying job!
    MICK
    22nd Feb 2017
    7:11pm
    Typical comment from rich man's government whose supporters have highly paid jobs. I remember Turnbull's response to a question asked by an ordinary Australian about how to get a house. His response was "get rich parents".
    Again this government has no interest in the plight of most of the country's citizens and only has interest in giving more public money to the already well off. Never changes.
    Rae
    23rd Feb 2017
    8:20am
    Well it did change there for a couple of decades MICK. Back during the 50s, 60s and into the 70s when productivity gains were shared up a bit more fairly between workers and owners.

    Top health and education provided by taxpayers helped whole families out of poverty into a home and the middle class.

    Taxes were reasonably high, business was booming, wages increasing and redistribution provided social justice for those in important but low paying jobs.

    The mantra was , we need you, we need lots of you but we can't afford to pay you much so here is a hospital, public train service and a good public school to make up for that poor pay.

    And it worked. We were a wealthy Nation that owned out own infrastructure that made us money but more importantly provided jobs and taxes that kept the whole thing going well.

    Then the 80s rolled around. Greed was good. The world's wealthy saw it was good and coveted it all. Now they have it all. Millions of highly skilled graduates have flooded in taking the best of the jobs.

    Pity about the nasty whiners in the high paying jobs who thought they shouldn't have to pay the teachers, nurses, cleaners. Someone else should. They wanted the money all for themselves. Howard gave it back to them in tax cuts and tax rebates and tax shelters. Middle and Upper class welfare. They were the lifters see.

    Houses are far too expensive on a glut of debt that will unravel at some point. Jobs are hard to come by and still 200 000 flood in to compete.

    And our hospitals, schools and public transport systems are back in 1980 but our population is at 2050 levels.

    And almost everyone, including the government is either broke or living on debt.

    You can't afford to work in those social service jobs any longer. They will never pay you enough for a house in the cities.

    You had better get a high paying job or make one for yourself because third world is coming to a group of people living near you and it's coming closer year by year. The milk has been spilt and is rotting in a puddle.

    Time to clean it up and get saving.
    Rosscoe
    22nd Feb 2017
    10:34am
    I guess you must have to possess no common sense to be elected to federal parliament. What a klutz! Pity the poor Victorians that this MP represents.
    Retired Knowall
    22nd Feb 2017
    4:38pm
    Makes you wonder who his constituents are? or what intellectual affliction they have to enable this muppet to get voted in.
    GeorgeM
    22nd Feb 2017
    11:50pm
    Not only lacking common sense, but also a failed University student as the article notes!
    First, they should stop all foreigners investing in Australian property, especially the out-of-control Chinese.
    Second, stop excessive immigration through the back-door via Students and 457 visa workers finding pathways to becoming Residents.
    Third, stop use of Negative Gearing beyond the 1st property.
    The above 3 simple measures should fix the excessive Demand problem, then the Supply and Demand balance can work out more sensibly for pricing.
    Catch any Political party taking such simple actions!
    inextratime
    22nd Feb 2017
    10:43am
    Had a high paying job, but silly me had children to raise, then got divorced and sold the house and then paid child support for 15 years. Could not afford to buy another house as the prices kept going up. Thanks for the advice tho.
    Brissiegirl
    22nd Feb 2017
    12:55pm
    Who would want to get married when 50% break up and the wife (if there are children) gets 66.6% of all assets, leaving the male to live in poverty for the rest of his life (unless he matches up with a new woman who received 66.6% in her divorce settlement)! Hanson wants to make pre-nuptial agreements prior to co-habitation a compulsory pre-requisite if divorce settlements are to be fair to both parties. Of course the female cry would be, "Oh, you don't love me". I know about a man who had significant assets and when he broached the subject of a pre-nuptial, the woman said, "Oh no, it's 50/50". His reply, "Yes you would receive 50% of my millions and I'd receive 50% of your nothing". Sensibly, that potential domestic relationship ended the next day. Pre-nuptial agreements are mandatory in some European countries. I can't think of anything worse than giving half (or more) of your hard-earned assets to someone you came to dislike. Particularly if a substantial amount of your assets were achieved prior to co-habitation. Clint Eastwood once joked in relation to marriage break-down: "It's easier to just find someone you hate and buy her a house." No wonder single person households is the fastest growing real estate demographic.
    Retired Knowall
    22nd Feb 2017
    4:39pm
    Instead of getting married, find someone you hate and give them your house. Same result in most cases.
    Alby
    22nd Feb 2017
    10:43am
    Mr Sukkar should be analysing the house purchasing prospects of the average worker in todays market in the various capitals. he should establish if an 'average' single person has enough income to provide the fundamentals of life and also purchase an average home in these centres. His analysis could then be extended to a working couple, a working couple with say 2 children and the accompanying costs of child minding. This analysis may demonstrate the current real world of life in Australia.
    ALBY
    Dave R
    22nd Feb 2017
    10:50am
    The Labor policies would reduce house prices by making existing housing less attractive to investors while retaining the incentives for building new housing.
    However, as Dick Smith pointed out this morning, with around 200,000 legal immigrants arriving annually housing will continue to be in demand keeping prices high.
    Our roads will continue to get more choked and other infrastructure strained.
    IMO Australia needs to significantly lower the intake of immigrants if any of these problems are to be solved.
    FrankC
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:38pm
    Why should that keep prices high? of course if you adopt the Gordon Gekko attitude that "Greed is Good ", well you will not be helping those that need it. if you want to sell a property be realistic, remember the real estate agent is thinking of his back pocket, not yours.
    Franky
    23rd Feb 2017
    2:14am
    You hit the nail on the head! We urgently need to look at our migrant intake and population policy. Rampant growth, also called cancer, is unsustainable.
    niemakawa
    23rd Feb 2017
    2:21am
    Franky, you are correct. 20 million Africans on their way to Western Europe in the next 3-5 years. Europe cannot cope with such an influx. Yes and as with our Government, the political elite will do nothing to stop it. The world is a complete mess, mass immigration will only bring civil unrest. But that's is the aim of the Globalists such as Turnbull, Shorten and many others.
    anicca
    22nd Feb 2017
    11:11am
    Mr. Sukkar is obviously out of touch with the average Australian. It will hardly be surprising if we have a voter backlash as in the US, UK and parts of Europe.

    It is my understanding that Turnbull used to be against negative gearing.

    It is also my understanding that 2,000 people are trying to settle into Melbourne every week. This is unsustainable. Are we trying to compete for the worlds most unliveable city by creating disillusioned young people (where only investors can afford houses). Where violence, homelessness and congestion on the roads are considered the norm.
    floss
    22nd Feb 2017
    11:11am
    Great comment Dave R now if this stupid federal government would take note the housing problem would disappear . But there is big money in population growth and this is all they care about , stuff Australia.
    bob
    22nd Feb 2017
    11:23am
    is he not one of the people who made their living out of finding ways for the rich to avoid paying their share of tax and as he says he was a terrible uni student that should qualify him for a government position
    The Librarian
    22nd Feb 2017
    11:33am
    So we are supposed to believe that the LNP can manage an economy in a reasonable manner. This type of irrational statement by one member of the LNP which unfortunately is consistent with LNP policy just shows how far they are from reality. I'm sure the economy will be fine despite the efforts of the LNP to enable a small section of society to grab whatever they can (and I'm not referring to the less well off here)
    Old Geezer
    22nd Feb 2017
    11:35am
    Easy. Just don't buy a house in Sydney or one of the other hot spots.
    Jess M
    22nd Feb 2017
    12:03pm
    Hi Old Geezer, that is the point working people cannot buy a house in Sydney or one of the hot spots.

    But, that is where the jobs are.

    Even the cost of housing far flung is very expensive. Still need two people working to pay for it. Travel is an option but adding several hours to the day who looks after the children.

    When we bought our house even with high interest rates they were in Sydney and a much smaller percentage of our income. Eh!!
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    12:46pm
    Well OG I guess someone with a reasonable job in Sydney but the price of homes are outside his ability should move to Tamworth. (on the advice of another erstwhile politician) Then they could afford a house.

    I guess there are plenty of jobs there. No matter I noticed Tamworth has a small airport they could commute back to Sydney every day. Hard driving Tamworth's a long way to Sydney.

    I guess we deserve the politicians we vote for.
    Old Geezer
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:40pm
    I thought those on welfare could live anywhere.
    Old Geezer
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:45pm
    Another think I fail to understand is that people commute to work every day to sit in front of a computer and then go home. Seems very silly to me when they could make one trip and take the computer home and work from there instead. You could live anywhere then.
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:47pm
    Now what the hell has welfare got to do with it?
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:51pm
    Gee! Are you on the turps early OG. To work from home when you are employed by a business is purely dependent upon the employer allowing this. Also a lot of jobs require accessing sensitive, privileged or private information. You wouldn't want this wizzing around the internet at the peril of being hacked by hackers. Who incidentally probably do work from home.
    Knight Templar
    22nd Feb 2017
    11:44am
    A self evident statement by Mr Sukkar. Unachievable for many who are not fortunate enough to earn high salaries. Even those who are well qualified in high paying positions invariably have student debts and other essential financial commitments. No one appears to have a realistic and pragmatic answer to the question of housing affordability. Reducing demand is probably one answer but that would rightly be unacceptable given the longer term benefits of population growth and the apparent right for people to settle in the location of their choice.
    Rae
    23rd Feb 2017
    8:33am
    Exactly. So if you want to live in Rozelle you had better get a lot of money fast somehow. Start a company, take it to market and get out with a few million. Easy.

    There are at least a billion people that can do that and want to come here to have a go. Millions have wealthy family backing.

    If your an ordinary type who wants to work for the man I'd suggest taking Orgs advice and move into a regional centre with jobs. Most are growing and have jobs that will allow purchase of a home at the much lower prices.
    Rae
    22nd Feb 2017
    12:08pm
    The 2000 to 3000 extra people flooding into Melbourne and Sydney have an distinct advantage.

    They are at the peak of their careers, have decent deposits for home purchase, are often sponsored by their Corporations and have no HECS debt.

    There is absolutely no way a young person starting out even in a very good, high paying job can compete with that. Unless they have wealthy family backing.

    Our population figures have hit the 2050 prediction levels already and still escalate.
    No infrastructure build to sustain that level of population and very little planning apart from developer free for all in habit-warren estates.
    Rosret
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:33pm
    The dwellings that are being built are tiny as well. They are not for families. It will put paid to our consumerism as they will neither have the room for items or any spare money to buy anything.
    Their lives are going to be bonded to a mortgage and their jobs.
    Who knows how the private superannuation scheme will survive when this younger generation comes to retirement age.
    Who would have believed we have gone from the lucky country in 1970 to this in 2010s. 40 years.
    How easy would it be for the government to say that homes must be at least 12 squares and a provision for all medium salaried singles to have the opportunity to purchase one of those homes.
    Rae
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:58pm
    Mum ran a Boarding House when I was a child. We had 4 single male workers living with us as boarders.

    I did a web search for boarding houses in Sydney recently and only ads for hotels came up.

    I'm sure an Air B&B type structure for safely guaranteeing insurance and security would suit a lot of retirees with spare rooms who badly need income.

    Even house sharing to help pay down debt.

    Then again all might just be fabulous and we are worrying about nothing.
    Budwah
    22nd Feb 2017
    12:35pm
    Typical politician arrogance. Unfortunately the majority of us elected them probably thinking 'Better the devil you know than the one you don't' very unfortunate for now we have to put up with their nonsense. They are so out of touch with the real world. The $273/ day allowance is an affront on decency emagin what a pensioner or someone on the street could do with just one day's worth.
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    12:39pm
    Ha! A Hockey replacement.

    "If you want to buy a house get a better job"

    Where do these people come from with their inane types of advice.

    I guess maybe this guy couldn't get a better job so he became a politician.

    I rather like Fred's putdown of Brandis on Q&A. Why do we deserve peop[le like this in our government.
    floss
    22nd Feb 2017
    12:49pm
    Name one problem that can't be solved by reducing population growth in Australia. Our population will grow any way , wake up Australia you can't grow a crop on cement we just do not require immigration.
    Retired Knowall
    22nd Feb 2017
    4:43pm
    That's what the indigenous people said back in 1770
    niemakawa
    22nd Feb 2017
    6:16pm
    Retired Knowall. I doubt that the aborigines said such a thing. Where was their infrastructure, roads, housing?
    casper dude
    22nd Feb 2017
    12:56pm
    My son and his wife and 1 18 month old daughter very excitedly emigrated to Melbourne from Bristol in the UK in December 2014 with the full intention of purchasing a home there. They were reading Melbourne was a very liveable city. Both are qualified chartered accountants though his wife opted not to work for the time being but still in a good position to purchase. My son found a "good" job in the city, though only on a contract, not permanent. They rented for 16 months at a ridiculous rent which took them months to find while they looked for a home to buy. It became impossible to buy, and he certainly wasn't prepared to buy for what was an old old shack for $2million, let alone a good place for $3-4million or move out to the outlying suburbs. They returned to the UK 12 months ago and
    he is earning a salary the same as if his wife was working in Melbourne, ie double that of here. Australia has lost 2 very well educated young people due to the cost of housing and living here. Jobs and growth and housing affordability are huge disadvantages for this country. No long the lucky country sadly.
    Brissiegirl
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:06pm
    That is a terribly sad account but I can see why they left. Housing prices in and around our capital cities are utterly ridiculous - Australia certainly is not paradise. Perhaps years ago when it was a safe country with ample work opportunities it was a destination to aspire to but not now. I think the government should go around and swipe say 25% off the value of all real estate but I guess that would create some form of economic chaos and is therefore an impossible idea.
    Rae
    22nd Feb 2017
    3:08pm
    Australia has been destroyed as we know it since 1975 onwards. It has been sold off to the highest bidder and then contracted back at exorbitant costs.

    I'm sad this happened to you and your family. I'm sad it happened at all.

    Our Grandchildren will wonder why we weren't rioting in the streets as our lifestyle was sold out from under us.

    Self funded retirees were just dudes out of around $4 billion because we can't afford it any more.

    Strange that was the amount Whitlam wanted to borrow to buy up all the mines for us, build the gas pipeline ad set up the Uranium processing Industry.

    If that had happened we would now have plenty of money, wonderful free schools and hospitals, low taxes and universal pensions. We would have the billions that disappear into Tax Havens elsewhere.

    The Road Less Travelled indeed.
    FrankC
    22nd Feb 2017
    4:02pm
    Back in 1976 ,my wife, two children and I moved from NZ to Tassie and lived in hospital accommodation, for $10/week for a 3 bed brick house in Latrobe, where I was employed as a medical Scientist at the local hospital. This allowed us to save for a deposit on a 732 sq.m. block, fully serviced for $3000. (yes 3 noughts ) We built a house on that block 15 square brick, veneer for $25K,and at a mortgage of 14.25% through the Heritage building society. That rate kept homes at a realistic price in keeping with the salaries at that time. The wave of stupidity on prices all started when the Reserve Bank started to lower the rates, and did not see what that would do for R.E. agents and prospective vendors. Each time rates dropped, prices went up, through greed. I lay the blame on the out of this world prices at the door of the Reserve Bank
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    4:17pm
    To True Rae,

    Here is an article that shows what the SECV was replaced with when our all (and I mean all high power lines, local line and power stations) electricity infrastructure was sold off.

    http://www.whytheheck-australia.com/governments-selling-farm/selling-electricity-infrastructure/
    Rae
    22nd Feb 2017
    7:03pm
    Oh certainly Frank the availability of money at cheap rates has fuelled this boom in prices plus the population growth rate.


    Thanks Wstaton I'll take a look.
    Brissiegirl
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:02pm
    Too many people needing to live as close as possible to their places of work, e.g. major cities. Australia is a peculiarly laid-out country. Long, long distances between capital cities. I'd love to see immigration stopped, except for highly skilled applicants who fill positions that otherwise cannot be filled by Australian citizens (non-working immigrants seem to get publicly funded housing priority), free up more land for new residences and give incentives to businesses to re-locate on the capital city fringes. Take out some highway lanes and install very fast trains. A high-paying job should be an avenue to more expensive housing but we need to ensure that young middle-income people can get their foot in the door providing they have realistic ideas - unlike so many today who are trying to start out at the same level of comfort that their elders are finishing up.
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:59pm
    That is the real problem here, all of the jobs are in the big cities. There is virtually no attempt by the government to give subsidies to businesses to open up in any of our regional areas.

    If there was then the comments of our erstwhile politician Barnaby Joyce would have some merit.

    What is this governments idea of creating jobs in the country? Moving existing jobs there. This is not job growth. Yet Mr Turnbull on response to Barnaby Joyce's silly idea for one job move to the count. "It's all about jobs and growth"

    Sometimes I wonder.
    musicveg
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:03pm
    Freeing up more land? Does that mean cutting down all the trees that koalas depend on (happening already) and using viable farming land that feeds many people (happening already).
    Rosret
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:20pm
    musicveg I don't think I have seen a Koala in the wild since I was a kid.
    There is a lot of reasonable land out there. It is a huge country but we do seem to build on prime land at our detriment.
    When you fly over east coast you can see a terrible misuse of our native habit from people wanting small cleared acreage for no other reason than to live in the country.
    The government needs to plan an infrastructure for some satellite cities with the full spectrum of possible careers.
    Franky
    23rd Feb 2017
    2:18am
    Good ideas, we need decentralization and lower our population growth to a more sustainable level.
    Rosret
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:20pm
    The very sad and quite alarming fact is what they are saying is actually the case.
    Foreign investors are looking after their own interests. There was a time our government looked after us. Australia grew as rapidly as it did because Great Britain invested in its growth.
    Now we have forgotten to grow the nation. We still prosper and rely on successful offshore investors.
    If we can't, as a united people, invest in our own future this country will be China's new frontier in 30 years.
    We, as a population, have become so insular in our quest for independent wealth we have abandoned our young adults and the common good.
    There is a balance between Socialism and Capitalism and the countries that continue to live comfortably understand that mix.
    musicveg
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:14pm
    It is already China's new frontier (maybe not quite the right word) but with us buying up all their products and helping them get richer they are looking to buy up our land to grow food for their millions of people. Soon all the rentals will be owned by foreign companies.
    Our government needs to invest in housing so the rent goes back into the country. Simple answer: build low cost housing and put in back into the kitty and end homelessness and make housing more affordable whether for buyers or renters. It has already been proven that once a person get's off the streets they can then concentrate on making their lives better with work and education therefore saving millions of dollars in welfare, health costs and crime.
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:14pm
    It's very interesting that the real growth and when we had a lot of our own industries which now have virtually disappeared was before that great mantra cry "Globalization" came about. Ever since we have slowly gone downhill relying on exporting our dirt.

    We are now in the position of actually export all our LNG and making it not only un-affordable for our use has caused a shortage locally as well. So much so that AGL is even thinking of importing it and recon they can do it cheap than buying it locally. Can't figure how that works mind you.

    This to me is akin to exporting all the food we produce and either letting us starve or importing all the food we need.

    You know what makes this worse? We are getting peanuts for for all our LNG exported. By 2021 it is reckoned that we will get about $800milion for the same amount of LNG Qatar export they are expected to get over $26billion.

    No wonder we have idiots like this politician.
    Lark Force
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:25pm
    By his(Sukkar) own admission he has an investment property. This is why politicians will not end Negative Gearing on existing properties. They have their snouts in the Negative Gearing trough.
    Negative Gearing = Tax avoidance.. and pushes prices up.
    Tax Avoidance = Housing Unaffordability...
    Investors and new migrants = Housing crisis.
    New Migrants = housing crisis, increase in crime, roads congested, trains crowded, hospital waiting lists lengthened.
    I want my Australia Back.
    Rosret
    22nd Feb 2017
    1:40pm
    I don't think negative gearing, higher interest rates or anything the banks do will control this situation.
    Retirees are buying investment properties with cash.
    Foreign investors are buying and building apartments with foreign money.
    Anyone who is already in the pyramid real estate business is OK.
    The problem is for anyone you needs to use REAL money to buy a home.
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:19pm
    Well "Retirees" are buying investment properties with cash!

    I know a lot of retirees, some true, have investment properties but I have not seen any of them throwing cash around to buy properties.
    Old Geezer
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:21pm
    Had a retired couple buy one of my houses in the last month.
    Rosret
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:00pm
    I have been tagging along to my son's house hunting recently. The grey brigade are at every listing and when the real estate agent offers a price range they actually mean any amount above the higher value is a starting point.
    My son doesn't even bother making an offer and the places are sold within a week of going on the market. Its crazy. There just aren't enough homes for sale and the demand is unbelievable.
    Di
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:00pm
    Do we have any politicians of any persuasion that has any idea of how the general population live. Brandis. "if you have a problem with letters of demand from Centrelink,
    Just ring them and sort it out". Obviously has never tried to do that!!!! Then this idiot
    "get a highly paid job". I ask you, and we pay these twits.
    FrankC
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:29pm
    Downward pressure on prices, ! - you can just imagine the R.E. agents have palpitations, albeit briefly, wondering 'will it really happen ?'
    johnp
    22nd Feb 2017
    2:58pm
    Aha; therein lies the problem
    Re
    "MPs such as Mr Sukkar are paid a base salary of $199,040 per year. He also receives the $273-per-day taxpayer-funded living allowance,"

    Extremely high CEO, upper management, etc etc; salaries and perks
    like Ahmed Fahour of Aust Post (gives money to moslem mosques etc), bank executives and all the other CEOs whose high salaries etc add to the high cost base that Australia has
    Earlier examples were like "Sol Trujillo" of Telstra and all his cronies from USA at the time

    excessive pollies, CEOs etc salaries, perks, travel etc
    A problem they are evidently not aware of and which they cause
    the expectation of these entitlements filters down thru the ranks of upper management and on down further in the food chain as well
    so the result - Australia is not competitive and not motivated especially technology wise
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    4:08pm
    Only down to a certain level johnp.

    Then brick wall (or maybe a Trump metal one) is built.

    All ye below this wall are there to make us profits to make us richer not to share in them.

    If you work harder and earn us more don't expect to participate with all our gains they are for us for screwing you.

    Be happy you have a job (like we have) and be satisfied with your lot.
    TREBOR
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:03pm
    Brick Ceiling...... it's the one way above the glass ceiling and affects more people than just a few women....
    Rae
    23rd Feb 2017
    8:42am
    No the big excuse was always we need so many nurses and police and cleaners and mechanics etc, etc that we can't afford to pay you enough. So we'll just take millions and you'll just have to make do because we need you.
    Sundays
    22nd Feb 2017
    3:22pm
    Is there one, just one federal Liberal politician at the moment who has any idea how average Australians live. These comments are on par with those from an interview I saw with Michaelia Cash where she said that her and all her friends started with nothing! In her case, it was and education from a private school, a law degree and a rich family.
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    4:28pm
    Yep ! was born in 1941 and was born with nothing, not even clothes.
    Knight Templar
    22nd Feb 2017
    5:54pm
    I think you're misguided if you believe that only Liberal politicians have no idea how average Australian's live. Labor politicians are equally indifferent and riding the gravy train despite their hollow and pretentious statements about helping working class Australia. Politics is now a career for an elite class who have never held down a real job in their lives.
    Bill
    22nd Feb 2017
    3:43pm
    Try reading what he said and he is dead right. A few, very few, saw that getting the highly paid job was the hard bit but I am glad a lot , across the political spectrum (I always wanted to type that) are getting the clues, COMPULSORY pre-nuptial agreements are the way to go and the family court (an oxymoron if ever I heard on) must NOT be able to overrule them, see family trusts, co9mpanies and other legal entities. COMPULSORY pre-nuptial agreements should be part and parcel of the ridiculously priced marriage licence. No pre-nup. (agreed between the parties) then no licence. Simple and I'll bet that the no. of marriages goes down. There are a LOT of golddiggers out there, of both sexes and anything else floating the surface.
    Personally, I know of quite a few single men and women who won't ever marry for the simple reason that a break-up, will cost them too much. A lot more than dollars and cents. Careers etc is what worries them. I agree. I could go on but I won't ...... and that will keep a lot of people happy. Ta, ta.
    Wstaton
    22nd Feb 2017
    4:30pm
    ?????
    Bill
    22nd Feb 2017
    3:46pm
    Do you take moaning pills before you get up every morning. Because that is all you do. Whinge.
    jackyd
    22nd Feb 2017
    5:50pm
    A bit rich getting stuck into one polie without seeing fit to have a dig at the whole broken down system where the only form of economic progress is in the rampant growth of an immigration policy that only adds to city congestion rather than regional develoment.
    The same kind of immigration policy( Greens 50000 per annum ) that encourages unskilled over qualified.
    Where are the skilled jobs apart from those that service that same rampant growth.
    Why can't we be like a Switzerland where skill is paramount to a modern progressive society.
    TREBOR
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:04pm
    One empty head at a time..... eventually we'll get the lot...
    niemakawa
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:08pm
    Only the people can change things for the better. Until they stop voting for the mainstream political parties expect more of the same.
    Old Man
    22nd Feb 2017
    6:12pm
    Can someone point out that we seem to be living on another planet to these geniuses. No politician has the cojones to do what is really needed in case there is a backlash on donations. Release more government owned land bypass local council regulations and develop it as a government project. This will immediately make cheap land available but will also reduce, albeit temporarily, the value of land in surrounding areas.
    Needy not Greedy
    22nd Feb 2017
    6:20pm
    Can you believe that with all the issues we need to address in this country Turnbull is busy spending his time sucking up to Israil, they have been fighting with Palestine since Samson slew 1000 Palestinians with the arsebone of a Jew, focus Malcom focus !!!
    niemakawa
    22nd Feb 2017
    6:21pm
    "Efficient policies" - an oxymoron for sure.

    22nd Feb 2017
    6:39pm
    plenty of work if youre not fussy no matter what age

    try seek.com.au thousands of jobs and not enough applicants
    niemakawa
    22nd Feb 2017
    7:06pm
    "seek and you will find"
    Anonymous
    22nd Feb 2017
    7:10pm
    absolutely Niema

    those saying they cant find work are just plain lazy in my opinion
    Rosret
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:03pm
    Not high paid jobs that will ensure you can buy a $1m property and be able to make repayments while your young wife stays home to look after her infant children.
    TREBOR
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:06pm
    Well he looks dumb - better to have never opened his mouth to prove it....

    Another Joe Huckster....
    niemakawa
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:43pm
    Politicians come election time focus on the same old chestnuts Health, Education, Families and of course the "deficit". What has any Government really achieved in the past 40 years for the people. Seems to be very little as more people are struggling today than ever before. Lib/Lab/Greens will not change, so the people have to ensure they do, don't vote for them
    Oldman Roo
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:29pm
    The longer I listen to the LNP Government , the more convinced I become that the average citizen is to be treated with contempt and Bull Sh.. .They are reminiscent of the old pharisees and ruthless capitalists with their motto " up the prices , united we stand "
    They are selling out Australia and most of the Public has to carry the burden because they have no real plan to improve the economy but are making sure they prosper and are cashing in on high Real estate prices
    They even have such wonderful phrases to make a heap of sh.. look beautiful .
    niemakawa
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:34pm
    Only the people can change things. Problem is in Australia complacency is rife and most will not change their voting habits. Of course the politicians know this and therefore have the upper hand.
    niemakawa
    22nd Feb 2017
    9:34pm
    Only the people can change things. Problem is in Australia complacency is rife and most will not change their voting habits. Of course the politicians know this and therefore have the upper hand.
    Mercury3640
    22nd Feb 2017
    10:04pm
    Bristol UK is a small city of 428,000 population. A quick Google of house prices there suggests that in the suburbs and satellite towns house prices are at least equal to what one would expect to pay on the outskirts of Melbourne. If any of my children had made a similar migration to Melbourne without researching house prices, locations, transport etc, didn't have a job to go to and couldn't find a house under $2 million I would keep quiet about it!

    The usual band of whingers have had their say - what we haven't heard from is the young people that are actually buying the new houses in the outer suburbs - they are not all speculators, not are they all on politicians salaries. Perhaps they did something really novel like being engaged for a while, living at home and saving like crazy for a deposit rather than shacking up together at the drop of a hat, having kids and paying rent. Yes, an outrageous idea - used to be the norm though.

    The whole subject is made worse by the media showing auctions in the inner city and quoting the median price for houses in Melbourne and then linking this figure to 'first time home buyers'. Channel 9 uses the terms 'average' and 'mean' as equivalent terms without even knowing the difference. First time home buyers typically do not bid at auctions in Toorak and are not interested in the mean price of a house in Melbourne proper. They are buying in Pakenham, Cranbourne, Officer and similar suburbs in the north and west of Melbourne. Yes these are a long way from the city centre but not everyone actually works in the city and those that do just have to put up with the travel, as has always been the case.
    gadsby
    22nd Feb 2017
    10:48pm
    the reason why house prices have gone balistic,is because wealthy Chinese are in the market now,buying top end propertys ,in desirerable suburbs ,near good schools,even well off Australians cant compete with that.
    Affordable houses are still available in Melbourne ,but youve got to be prepared to go to the outer suburbs.Its a pity but thats the way it is ,and thats the way its going to stay.

    and to the kiwi poster (his name escapes me )the reserve bank dropped intrest rate to try and stimulate a slowing economy/
    mogo51
    23rd Feb 2017
    10:56am
    Both major parties are driving a bigger wedge between the voters and their parties. They are out of touch, out of any ideas and in arrogant bliss. Of course o/s investors are damaging the housing market in Australia. I don't have a university degree and I can see that.
    The day is near when we will have a Coalition of Independents running this country - lets hope they can get it right, as Libs and Labor can't or won't.
    PIXAPD
    26th Feb 2017
    12:07am
    So politicians ADVISE folks to become politicians...... so they can rob the taxpayer ?
    PIXAPD
    26th Feb 2017
    12:08am
    RENT and be free


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