Nine things that will disappear in your lifetime

Did you know that the newspaper, the post office and television will all disappear in your lifetime?

Did you know that the newspaper, the post office and television will all disappear in your lifetime? So says the author of this forwarded email which has been making the rounds. Although a lot of it refers to the American market, it still makes you think – how much of what we take for granted is going to disappear?

1. The Newspaper
The younger generation simply don’t read the newspaper. They certainly don’t subscribe to a daily delivered print edition. That may go the way of the milkman and the laundry man. As for reading the paper online, get ready to pay for it. The rise in mobile Internet devices and e-readers has caused all the newspaper and magazine publishers to start developing a model for paid subscription services.

2. The Book
You say you will never give up the physical book that you hold in your hand. I said the same thing about downloading music from iTunes. I wanted my hard copy CD. But I quickly changed my mind when I discovered that I could get albums for half the price without ever leaving home to get the latest music. The same thing will happen with books. You can browse a bookstore online and even read a preview chapter before you buy. And the price is less than half that of a real book. And think of the convenience! Once you start flicking your fingers on the screen, you find that you are lost in the story, can’t wait to see what happens next, and forget that you’re holding a gadget instead of a book.

3. The Post Office
Get ready to imagine a world without post offices. They are in such deep financial trouble that there is probably no way to sustain them long term. Email, Fed Ex, and UPS have just about wiped out the minimum revenue needed to keep the post office in America alive, and many other countries are going the same way. Most of your daily mail consists of junk mail and bills.

4. The Cheque
Britain is already laying the groundwork to do away with cheques by 2018. It costs the financial system billions of dollars a year to process cheques. Plastic cards and online transactions will lead to the eventual demise of the cheque. This further contributes to the death of the post office. If you never paid your bills by mail or received them by mail, the post office would go out of business.

5. The Land Line Telephone
Unless you have a large family and make a lot of local calls, you don’t need it anymore. Most people keep it simply because they’ve always had it. But you are paying double charges for that extra service. Many of the mobile phone companies will let you call customers using the same mobile provider for free.

Click NEXT to find out which four other things will disappear in your lifetime

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    COMMENTS

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    Jen
    11th May 2012
    2:43pm
    I think there's a lot of truth there, but I find it hard to believe the Post Office will disappear. Not while Fedex etc. are SO expensive. I have a small online business which I run from home and each day I post out small packets to places within Australia for $1.10 and to the US, UK and NZ for $2.20. The same packet would cost $20 to the US by Fedex. More to Europe.

    Good riddance to TV and their incessant commercials, I barely watch it now. If I do, it's ABC. I get all my news online.
    Nan Norma
    11th May 2012
    6:34pm
    There's always a queue at my local post ofiice. They seem to have reinvented themselves.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    6:37pm
    And shortened the number of people serving. lol Mine is so old-fashioned, it doesn't even have an electric door! One has to open it oneself.
    Nan Norma
    11th May 2012
    7:47pm
    Crunchy. What a terrible inconvenience. Just joking. there's usual three srving but because they offer so many services now, selling stamps has become a sideline.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    8:03pm
    Yes, it's dreadful! As my Grandfather used to say, "Laziness is no good unless it's well carried out!"

    And as I quip back, "And he was often carried out!" Boom! Boom! He was English, hence the latter...

    I have to admit, there's a lot of available impulse buys...
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    2:51pm
    To some extent, I agree. But with the billions of people on this planet, some things will die a hard death, and that includes all of the above in the way of tangibles - especially books, CDs, DVDs.

    Also, re: privacy and cameras. Yes, but look how long it took to find bin Laden. Even with the most sophisticated hard/software, spy satellites, whatever, the fact that there are so many of us on this planet and using other people's identities as bin Laden did makes things a tad tough for those who have spying as a career.

    I recently had someone phish my email account and try to send out spam in my name - twice. I have now changed my password to my account, but I know it's a temporary fix.

    When I was young, I worked with my Mother in her retail jewellery shop. When we first opened, I remember talking to a bloke from Chubb Security, who installed both our alarm and the shatterproof window.

    He guaranteed me that whatever someone can manufacture to keep out nasty people can, of course, be intruded upon.

    Many years later, we had a huge robbery, the cost of which, today, would be a couple of million dollars. A security guard was bribed by the thieves, who then took their own sweet time to devestate all of my Mum's hard work and many years of sacrifice. We were not insured as we couldn't afford it (percentage of total stock worth, couldn't insure individual items, couldn't insure against shoplifting, couldn't insure opal at all, and we specialised in that), so Mum had to sue the Company that owned the building and provided the security. That took years to get to Court and she was finally awarded one third of the amount stolen.

    Don't think I have it in for security guards - my husband is one! lol
    Thai Traveller
    11th May 2012
    3:01pm
    The cost of books in Oz really gets up my nose. I had to buy some good quality dictionaries to take back to my school in Indonesia; these were published in the UK, and cost me $15.00 each in Singapore. A week later I saw the same books on sale in Perth for $45.00.

    I am now a keen fan of Kindle, and have 1300 books loaded which I travel around Asia with. I only have 1250 left to read! Think of all the trees this will save.
    Nan Norma
    11th May 2012
    6:37pm
    My friends and I all exchange books. I have a Kindle but can't very well pass that around. It was a lovely gift,but at this point in time I really have no use for it.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    6:39pm
    So it's an unKindled love.
    Precious
    16th Mar 2013
    2:31pm
    No more book buying then...
    Masuk...Sometimes its worth a call to the Battye Library in Northbdrige there just over the bridge at Station...They have books on sale most of the time and I`ve got some bargains there myself.....
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    3:03pm
    I agree with you there, but I buy at garage sales and op. shops. I get novels and books that I don't believe will ever make it online/Kindle.
    Thai Traveller
    11th May 2012
    4:12pm
    Kindle in Australia now comes with a CD/DVD with many thousands of the older books. I've enjoyed re-reading Kipling, C S Lewis, Wyndham, Sagan, Stevenson. All the books I loved as a kid and a teen are there, plus 100s I've been meaning to read....

    Next is Mark Twain..

    If you're travelling, or your bookshelves are full, it's the way to go.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    8:12pm
    Love the humour of Mr Clements. And especially love the fence painting scene.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    4:16pm
    Gee, I can see that! Wow! I understand about the classics, but, as a f'instance, does Kindle supply (and I cannot think it ever will!) such treasures as 'Anguished English' by Richard Lederer, 'Fowler's Modern English Usage' (both of which I use on a weekly radio programme about the English language for which I have a great, abiding love) and, to show you what a bloodthirsty little thing I am, 'Towards Zero' by Agatha Christie?
    textappa
    11th May 2012
    4:36pm
    Agreed Crunchy - amazing the quality reading you find in the 50c basket at Vinnies or Salvos. Don't be discouraged - you may have to burrow through a mountain of Mills 'n Boon - but there's gold in there. I pick up 10 good books every few months for $5,

    Masuk - I'm sure a Kindle would be very useful if I could afford one and could afford to travel around Asia Kindle in hand. Call me a Luddite if you want, but there is a certain tactile pleasure in holding a book in your hands and turning the pages.

    Though of course I use email, I still write letters in my own hand to friends and relatives and stick them in the postbox - as I have done since I was old enough to scribble. I do hope they don't steal all the postboxes like 'they' stole the phoneboxes
    .
    While it is traditional to denegrate the old in favour of the new, sometimes we throw out the baby with the bathwater in our headlong rush to do whatever faster, more efficiently, etc. I'm a huge fan of technology and can't imagine being without a computer or a mobile, but some things are sacred. Books and Post Offices please.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    8:13pm
    I agree. But this, too, might pass.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    4:58pm
    Oooh, and another advantage of a book - small ones I can fit into my handbag. In the middle of the night, if I can't sleep, within a few seconds, on goes the bedside light and the dogear is found in the book (I no longer worry about such things with el cheapo books!) and I am happily away, not having to start up the Kindle, worry about running out of battery or whatever.

    You are right, textappa, the tactility of a book is matchless!

    And browsing through a bookshop is unparalled wonder and joy!

    I bought an Upper Primary book a couple of days ago - I wouldn't have bothered on Kindle and I prob. wouldn't have seen it even, except by accident. Here's why, from the back cover blurb: 'Dear Dumb Diary,

    'I went back and read some of my very oldest diaries. The entries say things like "I eated salad dressing" and "I got a Barbie shoe stuck in Stinker's' nose again" and "The vet was mean to me about the Barbie shoe so I tried to bite him but vets are quick at not getting bit because dogs try all the time but dogs don't usually kick so I did that." '

    I roared with laughter! Priceless! And yet I paid 50 cents for it!

    I agree, Masuk, per volume size, Kindle beats a library hands down, but oh! the joy of handling books!
    Nan Norma
    11th May 2012
    7:44pm
    Crunchy, How can I share my books if I have them all on kindle. (I do own a kindle. A gift) I think I've spent more time recharging the battery than I have actually reading. That's added cost with the price of electricity, and all these thing could prove to costly to run. Anyway, don't forget the libraries. I have an excellent one across the street. If they never printed another book I'd still have enough to last a lifetime.
    Thai Traveller
    11th May 2012
    7:52pm
    if you're recharging often, maybe your wi-fi is switched on. Mine is off and one recharge lasts about two weeks. Cost would be somewhat less than recharging my mobile phone.

    Kindle does not use power to stay on, and only the wi-fi does.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    8:41pm
    Thankyou, masuk, interesting... I try to recharge every night. I call it (stop me if you've heard this one) 'sleep'. lol Sorry, couldn't resist.

    Interesting statistic: There are more books printed in the English language in one year than you can read full-time in a lifetime. Woo-hoo! Now, there's a challenge. Mind you, some of them, I don't think I WANT to read! lol
    textappa
    11th May 2012
    5:27pm
    All the points Crunchy for your priceless remark - "And browsing through a bookshop is unparalleled wonder and joy". Bless.Woof.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    5:33pm
    'Barky, snap, growl,' as we say in my family. Love your dog. Irish wolfhound? I have two miniature dachshunds, which my husband (I think, fondly) calls the 'barking rats'.

    David Gerrold once wrote (and I read this in a real book), 'A puppy is the only love money can buy'. So true.

    One of my dogs is named 'Mowgli'. When he was born, he looked to me exactly what Mowgli would look like if he was a dog. His mothers name was Caution, so that when we took her for walks, we could be said to be 'exercising Caution'. This is what passes for a sense of humour in my family. Sad, isn't it.
    Anonymous
    11th May 2012
    11:12pm
    Not sad, Crunchy; a lovely funny note to a very serious blog!
    normie 39
    11th May 2012
    5:38pm
    Re the Landline. I was under the impression that I need it to run my Broadband and Wi-Fi on my PC. If it means me buying an expensive iPhone or similar at inflated prices I will stick with the Landline until we see what's around the corner.

    Normie39
    Thai Traveller
    11th May 2012
    5:58pm
    you don't need a line at all now. I had "Telstra' wireless and it was fast and could use it all over Australia.

    use it in a lap top or a desk top.

    However, you are stuck with a 2 year contract, and they know how to charge if you need to bail out.

    Just need to ensure that you're in a good signal area. It's cheaper if you have a mobile phone and have it all in one 'bundle'.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    6:04pm
    Um, masuk, I actually had to switch back to a landline, Telstra kept telling me that lousy reception was at fault. Mind you, in the home before this one, I was on wireless and found that, despite five bars, I had HUGE problems with reception.

    With one thing and another, Telstra gave me about $1000 for my trouble and put the landline on for free. Good value. Pays to know about the Telecommunications Ombudsman.

    Oh, and before you ask (and you are welcome to ask about it all), I'm on a pension, not earning a living from the Internet and therefore some would say my need is not as great as other people's.
    textappa
    11th May 2012
    6:53pm
    HI Normie 39 - haven't had a land line for 10 years and laughing. It goes like this:

    3G Wireless Mobile Broadband for internet connection - Crazy John's (server = Vodafone) postpaid @ $19 monthly for 2 GB (6 month contract)

    Skype Landline subscription - $8 monthly or $83 annually (15% discount)
    Thus equipped you get UNLIMITED calls to landlines within Australia from your PC, no call connection fee!
    UNLIMITED = No more than 50 calls a day; No more than 6 hours a day: No more than 10,000 minutes a month (you would have to be on the phone more than 5 1/2 hours a day every day)

    Mobile - Again Crazy John's - "Flatchat" prepaid = 10c per whole minute; 10c connection fee; 1c texts (100 a day limit)

    Sooo....people call my mobile (only point of contact) then hang up and I call their landline on Skype and talk for hours no charge. Easy, and the cheapest phone on the planet.

    You can also rent an online phone number on Skype (people can call your computer from any phone) for another $8 monthly, or 1/2 price - $48 if you buy an $83 yearly landline sub. Personally I didn't bother as it's cheaper to work it in tandem with the super cheap mobile prepaid.
    Friends of mine do have online numbers and actually run businesses for a total annual phone bill of $83 + 48 = $131. Crazy....yeah crazy john's.com.au

    You owe yourselves to check it out.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    6:56pm
    textappa, I've been interested in Skype for some time but the one thing that has put me off has been the drop-out rate of the line. I'm just about to reveal the Secrets of the Universe to the Nearest and Dearest, and they and I get disconnected! Pwah! I've talked with a very close member of the family and told him about this concern of mine and he did not dispute it.
    textappa
    11th May 2012
    7:06pm
    P.S. Took me so long to type first post I just saw you reply to masuk - well done with the ombudsman by the way!
    But if ever you (or anyone else reading this) go wireless again, whether you are in a good reception area or not - can highly recommend a 5 metre active USB extension cable and hang your modem up in a window. Magic - best 35 bucks I ever spent @ dick Smith's.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    7:09pm
    Thankyou, textappa. A major part of my Secondary Eddoocashun was learning to touch type. You've no idea how useful that has been! I remember punch cards for computers from my Tertiary days! lol
    Thai Traveller
    11th May 2012
    7:30pm
    yep, also had reception problems. I was with a private company, and reception in Townsville was fantastic. Moved to the Gold Coast, and nil 3G and pathetic ADSL. Ombudsman sorted them out and I moved to Telstra with the tower across the road. Got two upgrades at no cost after grumbling about the opposition offering more!

    Get my Aussie digital papers delivered to the lap top every morning, listen to the ABC a lot of the day. Miss ABC TV.

    A big advantage is that you can use the same USB modem whether you're in Darwin, Perth or Hobart.

    As textappa says, often a booster or just moving the USB can help if the signal is not the best. That Dick Smith cable sounds sounds the bees knees!

    Regarding Skype, I chat to friends in China and haven't had a disconnection yet.

    I'm in my 70s, and seems I'm not alone here ;-) Living in Thailand as I can't afford to rent and eat and drive a car in my own country.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    7:32pm
    Thankyou for those kind words of encouragement, masuk. At least you get mangoes all through the year! Or perhaps I'm presuming too much!
    Thai Traveller
    11th May 2012
    7:37pm
    It's in the middle of the mango, rambutan and mangosteen season right now! I didn't do too badly for mangos in Townsville I might add, at the right time of the year.

    I've got 100baht ($3.00) in my hot little hand right now, as the fruit lady has just arrived and will stock up for the next few days. Keeps me regular!!
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    8:06pm
    Did you know, masuk, that the first person in Australia to start up a mango plantation was actually a woman.

    Yep! She figured, where woman goes, man-goes. Sad, isn't it...

    I dread to think how much 100baht could buy in the way of tropical fruit. Still, they don't have our wages over there. What about fruit fly? Lurrve tropical fruit. Also very fond of temperate fruit.

    Ahh! What the hey! I love fruit!
    Thai Traveller
    11th May 2012
    9:06pm
    The fruit lady, who has excellent English, almost filled my plastic bag with ready to eat mangoes, two kinds of banana (lady finger and Cavendish I think) and gave me back 60 baht change. Promised to have lychees and mangosteen on Sunday.

    Yup, I just made a bowl of custard to go with a sliced mango.
    Anonymous
    11th May 2012
    11:18pm
    Masuk, can I visit you in Thailand? I love fresh tropical fruit too.. and custard.
    Thai Traveller
    11th May 2012
    5:52pm
    I agree about the feel of books; it broke my heart to sell off my great collection of books when I had to move to a 1 roomer. (living on a pension)

    However, QLD and TAS have fantastic library services (don't know about the other states) so everything is also there, from 'hear a book' to DVDs, TV series, biographies .

    In the Kindle collection I have, looks like Agatha Christie is still in copyright, so not there. No Fowler's Dictionary but it comes with Oxford.

    Amazon books often have free books for DVD, and I just bought one for 99cents
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    8:11pm
    I am really blessed and do not have any habits (except, perhaps, breathing, eating (food is addictive, the withdrawal symptoms are fatal), garage sales and, of course, books. Oh, and talking and bad jokes. Other than that, none at all. Oh, and dachshunds. Weird, but there you are), so a lot of my pension goes in rent but there's a bit left over for other necessities - see above list.

    I am so very sorry about your having to sell your books. At least you know they went into loving arms.
    Crunchy
    11th May 2012
    6:11pm
    Fowler's Dictionary is entirely unlike the Oxford. To give you an idea, here's what Fowler's has to say about pedantry: 'Pedantry may be defined, for the purpose of this book, as the saying of things in language so learned or so demonstratively accurae as to imply a slur upon the generality, who are not capable or not desirous of such displays. The term, then, is obviously a relative one; my pendantry is your scholarship, his reasonable accuracy, her irreducible minimum of education, and someone else's ignorance. It is therefore not very profitable to dogmatize here on the subject; an essay would establish not what p. is, but only the place in the scale occupied by the author.'

    And so it goes on, hilariously. You ought to read the descriptions of oxymorons! lol

    I quote it a lot on my radio segment. Love it.
    textappa
    11th May 2012
    10:06pm
    Have to ask about this radio segment Crunchy. Are you a female shock-jock on talkback radio, or is it a more culchooral affair?
    Crunchy
    12th May 2012
    3:44pm
    Strickly culchooral, Mate! Vision Radio, Thursday mornings, usually before 9AM. It's only a short segment and it's on the peculiarities of the English language. They call me, bless 'em!

    The English language is the only language where a fat chance and a slim chance mean exactly the same thing! lol
    bizilizy
    12th May 2012
    3:34pm
    I know it's not really newspaper or book but I read a funny quote the other day by Agnes Brown from Mrs Browns Boys on BBC. Sanitised somewhat it said: For all those that think that computers will make paper obsolete obviously have never tried to wipe their bottom with a laptop!
    Crunchy
    12th May 2012
    3:46pm
    bizilizy, that's priceless! And thankyou for cleaning it up.

    I like computers, they make excellent anchors... Well, the older, heavier models do. Okay, now here's a challenge: imaginative ideas for computers for when they become too frustrating to use any more.
    kateW
    12th May 2012
    11:18pm
    I will always prefer a good book - one that I can "dog ear" if I choose, or underline a paragraph and more importantly one that I won't have to recharge every 10 hours or so!
    Crunchy
    13th May 2012
    1:43pm
    Good ol' Gutenberg! And his First Edition is still more expensive than the first Kindle! lol
    CindyLou
    13th May 2012
    12:48am
    Progress, two steps forward, one back...there are great advances such as medicine, however think something's are lost along the way. Technology, shopping online, downloading books or music, where is the human interaction, if this is the future it's a bit sad.
    Crunchy
    13th May 2012
    1:47pm
    That's so true, CindyLou. For my BA, I majored in non-verbal communication (you wouldn't believe it, considering how much talking I do!), and I am wondering if our NVC will change radically, given the way we 'talk' now. Studies seem to be backing that up.

    Found, lately, has also been the disturbing news that we actually get a 'high' from being on the Internet, with that high happening when we are on a game or checking our emails. Hence, the teenagers of today with no way to keep their minds on those around them because they are so busy texting via their iPhones.

    It's not just the electronic object that is getting a charge!
    Thai Traveller
    13th May 2012
    2:10am
    I read my Kindle for hours each day and recharge it once a fortnight. Maybe you're thinking of the energy consuming tablets and ipod.
    Crunchy
    13th May 2012
    1:48pm
    Thankyou, masuk, that's interesting information.
    Henry
    14th May 2012
    12:33pm
    Firstly, I agree with the list of things that will dissapear on my lifetime. I would like to add 2 more: hand writing and adding machines. Do you agree with me?
    Crunchy
    14th May 2012
    2:12pm
    Yup! And here's another one - politeness. The number of people (adults, too!) who just walk in front of me when I'm looking at things in the supermarket aisles without a 'Pardon me', just amazing. And then there's the idea that a mobile 'phone call is more important than the person in front of one.

    Diaries might well go the way of books, too.

    I was sort-of hoping a few years back that ironing might disappear too, but it seems not...

    Dominus tecum
    Leonie
    Thai Traveller
    14th May 2012
    5:38pm
    To be fair to all, I have found that as I grow older, the prices become blurrier, and I stand further back for them to come into focus! So lots walk between me and the goods.

    Maybe we should point out to supermarket managers, that larger print would be rather nice!

    It also takes me longer to find a bag of good ol' Aussie CHIPS! Lots if these French Fry thingies, whatever they might be, but I prefer to stick to English.
    Crunchy
    14th May 2012
    5:46pm
    I like to look at the whole selection, and up close, no matter how good my vision, can't do that! I get up close to find a product, so I'm the opposite of you, masuk!

    Can you get together with any other ex-pats. and put pressure on a retailer to carry a range of Smith's Crisps or whatever?

    Or get Olivia Newton-John to open another Koala Blue there? lol

    If things were in large print, the manufacturers would not be able to hide the truth... What's in there in what sort of quantities. I startled an older lady today by pointing out that the moisturiser she was looking at had, as its two largest components, water ('aqua', they call it) and urine ('urea'). I don't know which disgusted her more! lol
    Thai Traveller
    15th May 2012
    12:42pm
    ooooh! you are so mean. water and urine. hihi

    Yesterday I needed to buy some more shower wash, and I searched and searched.

    As with most Asian soaps and the like, they contain sodium or potassium hydroxide, which is a strong bleach and certainly dries the skin. This is a vanity thing, as the locals try to whiten their skin. Fortunately, the ingredients are mostly in English, and not Thai, so I could check them out. Out of the whole rack of washes, I eventually found one which does not have bleaching chemicals in.

    BTW: I was referring to chips, the sort one has with fish, not crisps.
    Crunchy
    15th May 2012
    1:03pm
    You have my sympathy. I'm sure you could import soap, though, or get it made to order with a backyard mob of greenies.

    Sorry about the misunderstanding with chips. Grow your own! lol
    bluemoon
    20th May 2012
    7:32am
    Yes get rid of the landline,rental is too high,pre paid mobile is the way to go,if your friends call you ,call them back as the deal I am on for 1 month is cheaper and you can call any mobile,landline 1300 numbers std.The soap is a worry when we live in our climate,dries your skin up,better off using a product with no soap,a body wash
    bluemoon
    20th May 2012
    7:32am
    Yes get rid of the landline,rental is too high,pre paid mobile is the way to go,if your friends call you ,call them back as the deal I am on for 1 month is cheaper and you can call any mobile,landline 1300 numbers std.The soap is a worry when we live in our climate,dries your skin up,better off using a product with no soap,a body wash
    Crunchy
    20th May 2012
    6:23pm
    A good friend of mine passed on a hint about body wash - less need to clean the shower glass as it is less likely to leave scum! I'm still using soap, mind you! As one nun said to another, "Old habits die hard...".
    Thai Traveller
    20th May 2012
    8:52pm
    I learned about the body wash trick about 18 months ago. It made a big difference in how often I had to scrub the shower bay tiles and glass.
    Precious
    16th Mar 2013
    2:13pm
    Heavens we ae are aging I myself rarely listen to music on radio etc anyway, Visiting the post office means renewing my GPO Box which will of course be online next time...Phones well I have landline cos one friend and a couple from UK still ring me...I use mobile all the time never IPOD havent a need and I will be getting myself a E Reader this week...lolololTV well lets hope it doesnt go before I do....its natural transition isnt it really...I dare say people will on the finish up before long or the ones that are no longer useful...??? Altho with TV it could go and I get a huge tv screen and put all my Techn o on that then and sit in another room with the zapper........


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