Single, older women at risk of homelessness

Why are so many single, older women becoming homeless?

Single, older women at risk of homelessness

Imagine a homeless person. What comes to mind? Most of us think of a down-trodden man, begging for change and sleeping on the street. While 56 per cent of homeless people are indeed male, the number of women over the age of 55 experiencing homelessness is growing rapidly.

According to the 2011 Census, there are over 5000 homeless women over the age of 55 in Australia, with single women being the most vulnerable group. In fact, Homelessness Australia suggests that being over the age of 45 and single, along with renting, significantly increases a woman’s risk of becoming homeless.

Homelessness Australia research also found that 64 per cent of older people living on the street are at risk of death within five years.

So what causes homelessness and why is it rising particularly among women?

There are a number of contributing factors. Mission Australia identifies domestic violence as the single biggest cause of homelessness in the nation. Along with issues related to elder abuse, “family and domestic violence is the leading cause of people seeking help for homelessness,” says Catherine Yeomans, CEO of Mission Australia.

Family violence and abuse aren’t the only reasons women find themselves on the street. A lack of financial resources and assets makes it difficult for women who fall victim to homelessness to sustain their housing situation.

“These are women who never thought they would ever find themselves in this predicament and it can be that they’ve had work that’s been intermittent, perhaps even part-time, as they balance family responsibilities and caring responsibilities,” says Ms Yeomans.

The housing affordability crisis also plays a massive part. In an ABC interview with Ms Yeomans last week, host Adam West made the statement that five per cent of all households occupied by seniors are paying 50 per cent of their income in rent.

Ms Yeomans says that as rental rates increase, older people living on fixed incomes or pensions are spending most of their income on accommodation, “leaving very little for the basics of life: food, health and transport”.

Recent research has found that in Melbourne and elsewhere in Australia, single women are being priced out a third of the rental market and forced into outer-city suburbs, due to the gender pay gap.

While the homeless rates overall are dire enough, the situation for Australia’s indigenous people is far worse. A staggering 25 per cent of Australia’s homeless are Aboriginals and Torres Strait Islanders. When it comes to homelessness, indigenous women are the most vulnerable group in Australia.

Sometimes there are 20 and 30 people living in a three-bedroom home,” says Ms Yeomans.  “Imagine a woman in her late 50s, 60s or 70s living with large [sic] family members.”

So what’s being done to tackle homelessness?

Ms Yeomans says Australia must increase the number of available homes if we are truly to address the housing crisis.

To that end, Mission Australia is putting pressure on the Commonwealth, state and territory governments to fund at least 200,000 new social homes by 2025.

“If there's not enough affordable housing now – and we know there is not – and we know that there is an ageing population…then of course the situation is going to get worse unless we take action now,” says Ms Yeomans.

Have you felt the effects of the housing affordability crisis? Do you struggle to pay rent and living costs on a fixed income or pension? What can be done to help tackle homelessness in Australia?

Read more at missionaustralia.org
Listen online at abc.net.au
Read more at abc.net.au

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    COMMENTS

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    CindyLou
    5th Oct 2016
    10:30am
    This is truly awful...I think the government and agencies need to think 'outside the square' to address these problems as it seems the current practices and planning is inadequate.

    Maybe it's a matter of supporting homeless folk to relocate to more affordable regional areas, I realize this means individuals loosing connection to familiar places, however, to continue to do the same thing, ie try to live in expensive capital cities is clearly too hard for people on limited means.

    I'd dislike having to have to relocate myself, however, I think if the choice was safety and a room to call my own, I'd bite the bullet so to speak and move.

    Just a thought re above suggestions, however, something needs to be planned as this problem is not going away ???
    Jannie
    5th Oct 2016
    6:49pm
    You all have to have your heads read, we cannot possibly house all of the refugees coming here and there are no jobs for them. Do not send them to country towns because the crime rate will be out of hand... no jobs.... what are they going to do.... would you all like to live next door to these ghettos no I think not....
    buby
    5th Oct 2016
    6:52pm
    This is truly awful Cindy, and in the past the elderly were looked after. and they were housed, there were not many ever that i saw on the street, unless they wanted to be there.
    but these days i find more and more are sitting around begging and sleeping out, and yes i also found that they are just not building to house older ppl nowadays, they build more to house families. Its a real sad fact, we are going down the USA way of living, its a cruel life.
    And also when families turn their backs on their own. They should be ashamed of themselves. Have they forgotten who fed them, kept them warm, and safe!!!!
    buby
    5th Oct 2016
    6:57pm
    Also Cindy many regional areas just don't have the rentals for singles, and again they only care about housing families.
    The Government is slack, they forgot who helped to build their nation, and have left a lot of oldies worn out and too tired to look after themselves even, and their families, have brushed them asides, its disgusting! OUR culture is a bad one, what have we taught the young ones. NOT much, they don't show respect, they abuse the older generation. thats what i see.
    Jannie
    5th Oct 2016
    6:57pm
    Buby everyone is struggling including the younger ones who you state should be looking after their elders, they cannot afford to look after themselves and their children let alone the elders. I feel there needs to be a stop to people breeding to get welfare from the government.. the Muslims are breeding ten fold they are the ones ripping off the system...stop this now before it is too late.
    CindyLou
    5th Oct 2016
    7:13pm
    Jannie, I was referring to our elderly Aussie folk and in regard to regional towns, I have found them to be friendly, welcoming to strangers. (my favorite Blackall, Queensland). I think that the government and or agencies could create enclaves for seniors with very simple accommodation - these folk would spend their money in the local town on groceries, etc. naturally this would place a strain on existing medical and other services but something has to give...
    ????

    In regard to refugees, it would be hoped that they could be housed throughout metropolitan and regional areas, however that's a complex and completely different situation.
    LiveItUp
    10th Oct 2016
    7:06am
    Our factories are full of overseas workers on work visas no wonder our kids and refugees cannot get jobs. Our farms are worked by backpackers. Our mines also have lots of overseas workers. There can be only one reason why this is so. They simply cost less due to our industrial relations laws for Australians. No wonder we have homeless people.
    Nan Norma
    5th Oct 2016
    11:05am
    Years ago Qld Housing Commission sold a lot of its "stock' saying it was proving too costly. The houses were renovated and sold very cheap. many were bought by investors. Today, where I live, when Qld housing tenants move out the houses are given to refugees. I could be wrong that houses build by Qld Houses and sold years ago, are being bought and rented out to refuges.
    I do realize that these families must have somewhere to live - but so must our own.
    There is a retirement village with only rental accommodation near me. Its a nice place, although over priced. (But still affordable on the pension) I think if there were more of these the price would come down.
    Happy cyclist
    5th Oct 2016
    11:50am
    NN, refugees are legitimate residents of the country once they have been processed and accepted and they too must have access to housing. The poor refugees who have been through untold horrors are not the problem. The problem is the total lack of housing which is suitable and affordable for people who for any number of reasons, find themselves on hard times and become homeless. You are right, what we need is much more stock available which can be afforded on a pension. That is what we need.
    There but for the grace of God etc. etc.
    Peanuts
    5th Oct 2016
    12:51pm
    Whilst I agree with Hc that refugees are entitled to accommodation, it would surely make sense to house them outside the expensive cities? Firstly, unlike older Australians (like Cl and NN), anywhere is unfamiliar territory. Secondly, unlike older Australians, younger refugees should be working, doing the types of jobs that Ozzies do not want to do. If they are genuine refugees (not just economic refugees), then whilst we have obligations like housing them and keeping them safe, they also have obligations, like working.
    Happy cyclist
    5th Oct 2016
    2:18pm
    Peanuts, my anglo ancestors were economic refugees as I imagine your ancestors were too. The flood of immigrants which came into Australia last century were all economic 'refugees'. It currently serves some political agendas to denigrate 'economic refugees' but what does it mean other than people who seek a better life and want to work hard to achieve that. Nothing wrong with it. They pay taxes and consume so its win/win for the economy and, therefore, the country.
    Not Amused
    5th Oct 2016
    3:13pm
    HC the economic refugees that came to this country post WWII were ready to put up with hardships. They lived in sub-standard accommodation, worked enthusiastically at any job offered, travelled long distances in order to be employed, built businesses, adopted our culture, learned the language quickly and were socially similar. so They received little to no benefits unlike what happens today where families of 6+ are housed in new 4-bedroom 2 bathroom houses and here we are talking about homelessness.Statistics show that certain refugee groups in very large numbers are still unemployed 12 years after they arrive in the Land of Centrelink.
    Happy cyclist
    5th Oct 2016
    6:02pm
    You make me laugh NA, it's attitudes like yours that refugees come up against when seeking employment. Talk to the residents of Young who turned around the town by employing a bunch of young Afghan men who worked tirelessly in the abattoir doing work most Australians would not do these days. There are many examples of recent refugees working hard in such businesses in previously dying towns around the country. Both unemployment stats and crime stats are slightly lower among refugees than non-refugees but attitudes like yours are to blame for holding them back.
    Jannie
    5th Oct 2016
    7:00pm
    PEOPLE PLEASE CUT THE POOR REFUGEES COMMENTS
    buby
    5th Oct 2016
    7:03pm
    and i can tell ya cyclist, God won't help there. IF the government won't help and invest in our own. God won't help much more either lol.
    REally this should have been done long ago, our own ppl housed, mostly the elderly, then the refugees, and in that order.
    It doesn't help now that we have so many of them, and the jobs are at such a down turn, and they roam the streets many of them, causing problems, cause they don't get disciplined, by their own, cause they have come from bad circumstances.
    and i do understand for my own mother and father came here to this great land after the war, but you know they had plenty of work after the war, and they worked hard, built their home. the refugees many now don't work they live on hand outs. Some may. and Good luck to them if they can find work. Cause many of our own, kids and adults alike can't find work, now?
    Jannie
    11th Oct 2016
    12:33pm
    Re the poor refugees FYI they are going to house them with the elderly in retirement villages hope all the do gooders get to be in amongst them. I for one will not go into any care when needed if refugees are there. It is not humanly right that only a few refugees get residency in Australia what about the countless millions who are suffering. You all don't forget it is not our wars that are causing this it is the corrupt governments all around the world they should be looking after their own. We do not have the funds to do this anymore. And also I live in an area that has a large amount of muslims and house prices have dropped, go figger.
    Erf
    5th Oct 2016
    11:05am
    From my recollections (no data) the homeless years ago were mainly men. There now seems to be a focus on women BUT the homeless men are still out there, in the same conditions, under the same circumstances. The issues have been neglected for decades and now more women are joining the pool perhaps some relief will occur. Homelessness is not the domain of any gender so any articles should present a statistical gender balance
    Not Amused
    5th Oct 2016
    3:05pm
    Gender balance only happens when the balance is all about women. I'm a woman so I'm not biased just stating the bleeding obvious.
    sexeebear
    5th Oct 2016
    11:59am
    the ammount of rescourses spent by do gooders in this field would fund goodness knows how many homes for homeless women and men. then lets take 50% off the minister for overstaffing/perks then the cost of admin for the charities as in 200k salleries and cars galore and nothing gets improved.. we could do with out all this and then we would have money to proprley subsidise rentals and whats to stop several homeless people living together in a property... re moving us on to the suburbs im 69 and have just moved to an outer area of brisbane for financial reasons. its very disorienting and im sort of feeling disconnected . this remedy is not recomended... re refugees .. if we HAVE to take them as the federal govt seem hell bent on doing so they can grandstand then the fed govt should provide housing for them as well as all the other rescourses they seem to take like dental interpreters etc. and now lets talk single mums.. these lasses mostly know the fathers of the kids.. let them jointly pay to house mother and child and if the fathers cant then we have armed forces for them where they will get 50k+ a year to pay for the kid.... i lived in brisbane in a 12x2 bed unit complex. i single mum, 2 single dads, 4 older single mums hanging onto their units no kids, 3 disabeled and 2 refugee one a single mum and one older.
    we need some people in the suport mechanisims and govt who actually know what they are doing and are not just there for the salleries and perks. overall on most fronts and states housing is a disaster and is abused shamefully. grass roots staffing dont give a damn. as i see it the bigest rorts are refugees and single parents with/without kids sort that youll sort the problems of supply.
    and while im on my soap box where ive moved to there are an unusually high number of single guys all having made themselves unemployable buy moving away from work.. can i suggest 8 weeks on the dole then in the forces for a couple of years.. theyre cheep cannon fodder if the alternative is the drain on the public purse and a growong number of unknown fathered children i exppect a plethoira of indignation about the above... im too old to care abiut that but im not to oldto have an opinion.. have a good day b
    Josie4
    5th Oct 2016
    2:52pm
    Do try to use some punctuation. Almost a gabble. Impossible to read.
    Rae
    5th Oct 2016
    5:19pm
    And you are entitled to an opinion.

    As a person living with one of the main causes of poverty, that is young people with no jobs or prospects I respect your viewpoint.

    We need more 36 X 1 bedroom units and bed sits that can be rented cheaply but with a manager to maintain the place and provide a bit of care.

    Pension management would also be an option if needed.

    Education within these complexes would be useful. Maybe using volunteers.

    They could teach punctuation Josie to those forced out of school after grade 4 to go off to work at very poorly paid jobs. There were hundreds of thousands never made it out of primary school.

    Or those with useless parents who couldn't bother to send them.

    If a crisis eventuates we will have to use halls etc and army stretchers and local soup kitchens.

    Anyone who hasn't read Orwell's Road To Wigan Pier" should do so.

    We are not there yet but we are on the way.

    A few new hospitals for the mentally ill and drug damaged would be welcome addition to the wealthy nation that can afford to hand back taxes to all and sundry and encourage the top 10% to pay none at all.

    We have so much money, some spent on the frail, ill, damaged and in poverty would be a good use of a fraction of that spent buying seats on UN councils, corporations and incompetent politicians.
    buby
    5th Oct 2016
    7:21pm
    yes sexee you are on the right trail there, some very good ideas, pity the pollies won't take much notice, WE are only OLd ppl.
    'and another good idea Rae is perhaps the volunteers could teach the refugees on how to speak english and perhaps they could help with some volunteer work, they could blend in nicely :)
    and I'm sure Josie wouldn't mind helping :)
    Pamiea
    5th Oct 2016
    12:05pm
    Very sad situation. In San Francisco near Fishermans Wharf the homeless live in large cardboard boxes. Disgraceful and they spend so much money launching rockets to the moon and research. Give me people any day. Why cant someone cone up with a Telethon type of scenario to raise money for housing for these people. I think a lot of people would donate.
    sexeebear
    5th Oct 2016
    12:17pm
    oh dear
    pamiea.. you seem to have missed the point comletely. it should not be up to tax paying public to house people. thats what we pay taxes for.. the fact that these taxes are misused (ministers saleries and staffing levels) or used to grandstand(refugees) is the issue as is the costs of building social housing especially for minorities is between 30-50 % higher that conventonal housing. the system needs a radical overhall and some sense put into the equasion
    so heres a quandry. housing 1 disabled non australian or housing 6 non disabled australians. now you deci
    de. 0h happy days
    FM
    5th Oct 2016
    12:26pm
    There has not been adequate social housing for decades. In the 1970s it was most unusual to see a homeless person on the streets of Sydney now they are on every street corner, most of them older people who look ill and helpless. The need for social housing was increased by the closure of mental health institutions which meant many people with mental health issues were left to find their way in the community. The accommodation provided for them was often truly awful, unsafe, dirty and partly open to the elements.
    buby
    5th Oct 2016
    7:27pm
    and do you know why many become mentally ill.
    Often cause their families put them down, then they become inept to think for themselves and they know not what to do.
    The pscho, and doctors that work in that area, think that feeding them drugs will help them. But it only makes them worse. And most will never ever get back to any sort of normality.
    the governments have a big part to play, and certainly they are not helping ppl, and more will become homeless and mentally ill as this type of behavior is left unaddressed?
    Ozbanislam
    5th Oct 2016
    1:20pm
    Not long now,YESHUA HA'MOSHIACH (aka Jesus Christ) is coming very soon.Those who endure to the end will be saved.Stay faithful through it all my friends.Nearly there!
    Old Geezer
    5th Oct 2016
    2:29pm
    How will you know when he has arrived? I can just see your reaction if I knocked on your door and said I was Jesus Christ.
    grounded
    5th Oct 2016
    3:15pm
    @ Old Geezer...Thank you, ever so much, for your understanding OG. My eternal blessings are with you. I'm tired of having doors constantly slammed in my face. Last time I was here, they strung me up on a cross between two thieves...probably druggies trying to support their habit.

    My old man just doesn't understand. He sends me off on these wild goose chase gigs...telling me how much I must love 'my people'. Lordy, Lordy I say...(that's me dad's family handle), how do you love these cretins...with my nose now near recessed a full inch back into my head...from near rocket propelled slamming closed door handles enlarging my nostrils to size of mini Grand Canyons.

    Right on you are OG...this 'saviour' business brings out some very strange reactions....even St. Mary's now has Tongan bouncers who hunt me every time I drop by for a yarn with the Cardinal.

    I despair at times OG. I can't see my Second Coming being anywhere near the hit as those Three Crosses on the Mount First Coming were.

    Ah well, a Redeemers work is never done....and the Arch-Bishop has promised to give me directions as to where I can score a bowl of soup this evening. Now, if only I can sort out this severe nasal problem I have.....
    Bookworm
    5th Oct 2016
    3:17pm
    Oh dear, is there a full moon tonight? What with John's foul mouthed tirade above (I shall come around and wash out your mouth with soap, John), and now Ozbanislam and his invisible sky friend, I do believe I must have a cup of tea and a good lie down.
    This is a classy site, John, and it's not for pushing a particular tribal god, Ozban, so please desist, both of you.
    MD
    6th Oct 2016
    4:07pm
    Oh JC no, not you again OG ---- (door slams) ! Bless my soul.
    LiveItUp
    10th Oct 2016
    7:14am
    Well I myself have found that most genuinely religious people have mental problems but good on them for finding a way to cope in this less less than perfect world.
    KSS
    5th Oct 2016
    1:27pm
    Every time there is an 'issue' up goes the cry to strip the parliamentarians of their salaries and pensions to pay for it: pensions, healthcare, hospitals, education, mental health needs now homelessness. Just how much do you think this would raise? How will you apportion it to all the 'worthy' causes?

    Public housing is a state government responsibility not the Commonwealth. It should also be a safety net for a limited period of time. As with all types of welfare there are those who rort the system. In the case of housing there are those who have fulltime jobs, new cars in the driveway and holidays every year yet still live in public housing. These people should be moved on. Then as the family age, the house is bequeathed to the next generation. This should be stopped. Likewise all those older people whose families have all moved out leaving a single or a couple in a three bedroom house for example. Whilst they are there, they are denying a home to another family in need. It is NOT their property, never was, and they should be moved into smaller accommodation even if that means moving to another district.

    Yes there should be some public housing specifically for older singles (men and women) perhaps in shared housing e.g. 3-4 singles in a 3-4 bedroom house (all men, all women or mixed) perhaps as studio apartments. And who takes priority anyway and who would be prepared to make that decision? Children? Young teens/adults? Victims of abuse (male or female)? Those with mental illness - which type of mental illness would qualify? Old men or women? The chronically sick?

    At the end of the day public housing is not and never should be an 'entitlement' or a 'right'. It is welfare and should not be allowed to morph into a lifetime occupancy. Give a hand up with appropriate support NOT a handout and a lifetime of welfare.

    I also object to this sentence in the article: " “Imagine a woman in her late 50s, 60s or 70s living with large [sic] family members.” made with reference or association to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. It maybe an anathema to Ms Yeomans, but in many cultures (including some indigenous communities, even some European communities ) it is the culturally expected and acceptable thing to do. We simply cannot impose a different view on any situation just because we think differently. Why not advocate for seeking the opinion of those affected before making such ill-informed claims?
    buby
    5th Oct 2016
    7:32pm
    aw common Kss, I reckon we could make a killing standing outside parliament, rattling our tins. Yelling MONEY for the homeless, and giving them sleepy head in parliament a run for their money, perhaps we could take over their jobs. I'm sure some of us could do better than them. I wonder if they could live like some of the homeless do.
    I reckon they would crack in a day?>
    Not Amused
    5th Oct 2016
    3:04pm
    And there are people such as ACOSS advocating that the value of the family home should be included in the assets test for a pension. That would be a major disincentive to strive for home ownership, why bother. If that idea ever gets a run we can look forward to more people wanting even more taxpayer funded housing. But is this really another story about poor woe-begotten women? If women leave the family home we usually take 3/4 or more of everything with us, whether or not we ever contributed anything in the financial sense. Someone says Australia is taking 12,000 "refugees" from Syria - what's wrong with the Arabs looking after their own and us looking after ourselves? I'm truly sick of the crying woman syndrome and I know charities allocate good housing to refugees while host citizens have to get on waiting lists and beg for a roof over their heads. Charities heavily subsidise government funded, high quality housing for newcomers and bugger Australians we can fend for ourselves.
    Jannie
    5th Oct 2016
    6:52pm
    AGREE
    Mez
    6th Oct 2016
    10:06am
    NOT AMUSED.....You had better read my other comments in this discussion rather than me repeating it all.
    You forget that nearly 2 women each week in Australia are killed by their partner!
    DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ACCOUNTS FOR THE INCREASING HOMELESSNESS OF WOMEN INCLUDING OLDER WOMEN!
    The rest speaks for itself.
    Also, it is men like you who have been responsible for women being paid 20% less than men on the average in wages!
    Adrianus
    6th Oct 2016
    10:22am
    Mez, maybe you had better read "Not Amused's" post again? That way you can perform a reverse sex change on her :)
    Do you know why women are paid 20% less than men?
    I would be interested to know because I've not seen any evidence of that?
    You make it sound like an employer would opt for a female (cheap labour) to do the job instead of an overpaid male?
    If that were the case, then why are there less females in the workforce?
    Why?
    When female workers are cheaper?
    Something is not adding up for me?
    Mez
    6th Oct 2016
    10:35am
    FRANK....You need to read my comments and think more about them as well as others comments to obtain your answers.
    The media gives figures of 20% and wages are lower because itis mostly men in business and in management who squeeze the figures for women because women have not been assertive enough to demand them as a result of having kids to look after because their partners had not shared the load of child rearing!
    Women also by nature of their genetic makeup have mostly been worried about their attractiveness and need to please so fearing losing their jobs if making demands.
    Adrianus
    6th Oct 2016
    11:19am
    MEZ..... I think you may be talking about the USA statistically? Where the gender pay gap is 20%. But here in Australia it is 15%, which is based on AWOTE of full time workers. It varies within industries. For example, in the Financial Services Industry it is over 30%, while in Public Admin. it is only 7%. But again the overall gender pay gap here in OZ is 15%.
    The biggest gap overall is seen when the individual employee negotiates their own rate of pay. I've employed many women who are damn good at getting a better than average pay rate. Their communication skills and conflict resolution skills are top notch. But I think where the issue lies is with "time out of the workforce."
    Women are more inclined to be away from the workforce and this can effect those negotiating skills. The old adage, if you don't use it, you lose it. So I agree with your assessment in part. But the problem I have is that many women want to make this a gender bias issue. It is not a gender bias issue.
    If men were away from the workforce for extended periods then they too would encounter the same degradation of skills.
    LiveItUp
    10th Oct 2016
    7:22am
    I am disgusted with modern women who now enforce upon men that what is mine is mine and what is yours is mine too. It is simply disgusting that many women today live with men long enough to get everything they possibly can from a man. Any children should be taken away from these woman because they being used as pawns to get as much out of men they can. If a woman wants money she should work for it not prostitute herself in this way.
    Adrianus
    10th Oct 2016
    11:01am
    Bonny if that is the case, I mean if there is a culture of this sort of behaviour from women in relationships. Then it may help explain why the divorce rate is so high, particularly with older couples?
    Tassie
    5th Oct 2016
    3:42pm
    The Govt needs to have good cheap accommodation for these poor women who find themselves in this horrid situation through no fault if their own...being the age they are and single they would make good tenants...opposed to some who just abuse govt cheap accommodation..and we all know their out there in hordes .they should be housed in seperate accommodation like units, somewhere together so they won't have to live next door to some of the worst tenants that we often see on thee television. They already have to give up friends and family often..this is shameful for Australia, that it goes on today..
    MICK
    5th Oct 2016
    5:44pm
    "56% of homeless people are male".

    So why are you pushing the women's barrow again? It's bad enough that men repeatedly hear the women's lament about female cancers (like every fortnight!) whilst the men get perhaps one airing a year.
    Your story is the sort of bias which has become the norm in Australia Amelia. Unashamed one sided BS. Give it a break! We do not need this sort of nonsense!
    Not Amused
    5th Oct 2016
    6:34pm
    Why not get some experts to write columns here from a male perspective - their despair, the high incidence of male suicide, the slow miserable psychological damage perpetrated on men by clever female "partners" until they are pushed beyond the limit. Why do we get these continual stories sympathetic to the female gender while our opposite sex is left floundering and suffering in typical male "must be strong" silence. If a few Men's Sheds is the best our society can offer then we should be thoroughly ashamed. One day the worm will turn but who is going to jolt men into action I don't know because they will be shouted down, called sexist misogynists, demonised... you know the routine.
    Mez
    6th Oct 2016
    9:59am
    MICK....The facts are that figures for female homelessness is increasing MORE RAPIDLY as a result of the elderly men who used to be in businesses and management responsible for paying lower wages for women!
    Women earn 20 %less than men in Australia on the average NOW and this has not improved either!
    Jannie
    5th Oct 2016
    6:46pm
    I am sick and tired of hearing about the poor refugees. We need to look after our own homeless before letting refugees into Australia. The countries where these so called refugees come from need to be made accountable for their own. We cannot possibly care for the billions of refugees left homeless after their conflicts. It is not humane to care for a handful of refugees when there are billions around the globe.. Go figure...
    Rae
    5th Oct 2016
    7:13pm
    It is sad Jannie but so true.These country's do not have the resources for the populations and they keep spitting out kids.

    The middle east cut down their last forest hundreds of years ago. It no longer rains there. There is very little water.

    There was a photo of two men running from bombs in Syria holding newborn babies.

    Are they insane?

    Have they no control?

    I just don't understand it either.

    If our country had been racked with civil war for 6 years would you be having a baby?
    Even the Burka doesn't seem to stop the baby making from continuing. Fat lot of good it seems to be doing.

    I honestly believe the Celts and the Muslims have such a chasm in understanding it will take generations to come to grips with it all.

    Meanwhile we need to do something about the increasing homeless amongst us here and now.
    Adrianus
    6th Oct 2016
    9:19am
    Jannie, sadly it is all about votes. I wouldn't know but I guess homeless people rarely vote.
    All those $millions paid to the Clinton Foundation and The Global Education Fund could have been used here at home.
    Adrianus
    5th Oct 2016
    7:07pm
    I think if one is homeless then housing affordability does not play a major negative factor.
    There are many cheap homes around the country but for a homeless person the trauma and cost of a change of scenery can be significant. I was once a homeless person so I can have some real empathy with their plight.
    Rae
    5th Oct 2016
    7:27pm
    It must be terrifying Frank.

    We need a Caroline Chisholm to set up support networks.

    What an example to all Australians that Lady was.

    We may have to do something before too long because this neoliberal government is so lost in the ideology that we won't be able to count on them.

    It isn't looking good for an awful lot of the meek, frail, ill, damaged and mentally ill.

    We should be ashamed of ourselves.

    Even in the Middle Ages these people were cared for by their communities.
    Mez
    6th Oct 2016
    9:54am
    Sad to learn of your previous homelessness.
    Hope that it will not happen again.
    Also, it is nothing to be ashamed of because it may happen suddenly overnight to the most wealthy even depending on their lifestyles or vice styles.
    Very hard on mothers with young children as a result of lack of support structures for victims of domestic violence which is shamefully prevalent!
    Adrianus
    6th Oct 2016
    10:00am
    You need to find a place to hide. In the old days there was a "Vagrancy Law" so the police would come and move the homeless people along. They were very kind hearted about it and occasionally a good cop would ask when you last ate a meal. If you were honest and said 2 days ago then the cop would offer to arrest you so you could spend a night in the cell. "we've got chicken and vegetables back at the station, it's not much but probably more than you've had recently? These days I doubt that hunger is the real issue it was.
    As Bilby has mentioned elsewhere, there are many reasons people could be sleeping rough and mostly it's due to substance abuse. In my case it was due to emotional and physical abuse from parents. I found I was safer on the street.
    Aussie
    5th Oct 2016
    7:42pm
    Hurray Hurray lets bring more poor suffering refugees and stuff up all out oldies and needy citizens of Australia.
    We spend bloody millions on the f... poor refugees ....and providing homes and cash money Hurray Hurray to our own poor, old and needy citizens that have to sleep on a car or on the streets but hey hey the refugees have a home and money

    This is all bulshit ....

    Maybe I am insensitive to the refugees but I feel for our own people FIRST ...F FIRST ...then the rest of refugees

    Yes we need to help the refugees I agree but our people First

    This is my opinion
    tendj
    5th Oct 2016
    8:35pm
    Mine too look after our own first the rest can wait
    Aussie
    6th Oct 2016
    1:11am
    tendj
    Yes but to many politicians with their head on their bum so they forget about our own people but they are Ok with a big pension to come when they go away from their political life.

    What they doing this is total Bullshit ....
    Mez
    6th Oct 2016
    9:47am
    AUSSIE....Very good point about the looney Leftists wanting to bring in all the Muslim refugees when AUSTRALIA HAS OVER 100,000 HOMELESS PEOPLE!
    We cannot afford that but these Leftists have their heads in the clouds that they do not see reality!
    Aussie
    6th Oct 2016
    4:32pm
    Mez
    Totally agreed ... I am an very old (he he) new Australian but today the immigration and assistance to foreign people is totally wrong I came in the 70's with my own money pay my own way work for over 45 years very grateful to AU that give me a great life but now the new do gooders are giving all to the famous refugees and forget totally about our own people.

    SHIT ... we have a major problem here look at Melbourne with the APEX gang ... jail the basters or deport them we do not need rubbish people here we only need good people like in the old days with the Italians and Greeks that help to build our country and build good families and contribute to the AU way of life.

    So Yeahhhh this is Bulkshit ...HELP OUR OWN FIRST THEN LOOK TO OTHERS

    I work very hard, pay big taxes to help others on a pension and build the country - Provide 3 professional Australian kids now working hard.

    That is my view as old-New Australian (Not refugee he he he he).
    Rae
    6th Oct 2016
    4:32pm
    Except Mez it has actually been the loony far right bringing in immigrants by the hundreds of thousands and 457 visa by the 1.5 million to keep unemployment high, wages stagnant and house prices high.
    Aussie
    6th Oct 2016
    4:37pm
    Mez

    Australia is Now an image of USA ..... and now we lost our own identity ... We are followers of USA in almost everything.

    How terrible this is ....Back in the 70's our country was free, beautiful, peaceful .....if you were in Sydney may remember a good night out around Kings Cross just for fun then walk around anywhere free, safe and happy .....??? Can you do that today ????? I do not think so

    Let be sure we carry some sort of defence with us if you walk around .... to many APEX gangs supported by our Gov. providing Centrelink assistance .....Another Joke
    Aussie
    6th Oct 2016
    4:37pm
    Mez

    Australia is Now an image of USA ..... and now we lost our own identity ... We are followers of USA in almost everything.

    How terrible this is ....Back in the 70's our country was free, beautiful, peaceful .....if you were in Sydney may remember a good night out around Kings Cross just for fun then walk around anywhere free, safe and happy .....??? Can you do that today ????? I do not think so

    Let be sure we carry some sort of defence with us if you walk around .... to many APEX gangs supported by our Gov. providing Centrelink assistance .....Another Joke
    Adrianus
    6th Oct 2016
    5:06pm
    Rae, I don't know where you get that information. More 457 workers arrived in Australia under the Labor government. In fact the ALP and the Unions were a big employer of 457 workers. PM Gillard's political strategist was on a 457.

    5th Oct 2016
    9:33pm
    while a lot of the points you people bring up are relevant factors, i find that almost all the homeless people i have met are homeless because of their addictions to alcohol and gambling and in some cases drugs.
    i met a homeless guy, about 40ish in sydney who had been twice been given housing commision units but preferred to be homeless. spent all his pension on beer and cigarettes within 24 hours of being paid and spends the rest of the fortnight picking up cigarette butts and asking people for cigarettes. sleeps on suburban trains, and has been reported countless times for travelling without a ticket on the trains. doesnt bother fronting court though, and i doubt he ever receives a summons because he has no address.

    another homeless guy i knew was a compulsive gambler. tab used to get all of his pension each payday, except for what he spent on a bottle of whiskey prior to going to the tab. occasionally he got a big win and usually moved interstate.

    eventually his mother pulled strings and got him a housing commission unit in a posh part of melbourne. she pays his rent so he is no longer homeless. however his fortnightly ritual on payday hasnt changed. 1 bottle of whiskey, a fortnightly supply of transport tickets, then off to the tab. he gets about 4 to 5 free meals a day from various charities that are heavily govt funded.

    you can spend an extra ten billion dollars a week on the homeless problem and it won't go away.

    only way to get rid of it is to provide full employment and abolish the dole. even then there will still be a few homeless left.
    its a sad problem but i cant see it ever going away.
    MD
    6th Oct 2016
    4:12pm
    All good noname, at least the $ are being recycled. Somebody gets the benefit from the benefit.
    Anonymous
    7th Oct 2016
    6:09pm
    md - i dunno why they took my name off the post. on most articles i dont have "reply" to click on. they have threatened to ban me because i dont kiss islamic butt like most people do. apparently it is "racism" if you point out the indisputable fact that islam is a sick minded hate based cult, founded by a paediphile named mohammed who took child brides from among slaves, some as young as 6 years old, and used "politically correct" laws of the ancient meccans which insisted on religious freedom, and used those laws to flourish in mecca and then wiped them out tribe by tribe and made his hate cult (islam) the only legal religion in mecca. would you consent to your 6 year old daughter being forced to marry an old bearded pervert who had grandkids much older than her? would you consent to her having her clitoris amputated?

    however on this site, you can get banned from it for "racism" despite the fact that islam isnt a race. its simply a sick minded hate based cult, about on par with the teachings of charles manson or jim jones.
    if you want to keep an open mind and look into it. check out a private website at HOTHEADS.COM.AU
    also do a google search on mohammed and read up on what the scumbag really was, then ask yourself, how could any sane person condone his teachings let alone kill for the prick's ideas?

    however be prepared to be banned for "racism" despite the fact that islam isnt a race
    apparently they dont see australian as a race or nationality because muslims can freely bad name australians in public and on tv without fear of being called "racist" or "bigoted".
    Mez
    7th Oct 2016
    11:58pm
    It's a vicious circle.......many homeless do not start out as druggies nor alcoholics but have resorted to it as relief and comfort from the emotionak pains that they are suffering from being abused by their parent/s.
    Those in juvenile detention centres or homes are the same where ghey meet with other so called bad company then its prison and more prison because of homekessness.
    Same happening with our aboriginals!
    Drugs may lead to psychosis to those genetically predisposed to becoming psychotic as schizophrenics or either they were mentally disturbed because of abuse and resort to drugs as self medication!
    Most older women will not be in that category but are homeless as a result oc many other family and financial hardships often caused BY MEN!
    War veterans homelessness is also on the increase as indeed are suicides!
    There are more deaths by suicides in homeless war veterans as a result of PTSD than deaths on the battlefields!
    I did not believe this at first when I had read about it on Americans but later found it to be the same with us Aussies! Shameful!

    5th Oct 2016
    9:41pm
    one little known factor in causing homelessness or housing shortages is the closure of mental hospitals and inner city retirement homes whose real estate value becomes so high that the salvation army or whomever owns the property cannot resist selling it, and the elderly residents have to fend for themselves. in some cases the property ends up as some useless "community organisation". a classic example is callum park in sydney. hillcrest hospital in adelaide is another example of greed selling.
    there was a huge elderley residential complex on the beach in melbourne, i think it was black rock beach. anyway somebody made the salvation army an offer they couldnt refuse so the salvos sold it and told the residents to go fend for themselves.

    then the salvos have the hide to demand more govt funding.

    another factor for homelessness, is that some people can only handle living in rented rooms, as they cannot organise a household. problem is that boarding houses cant get insurance any more due to the amount of bullshit injury claims so most of them have closed down. this valuable service used to keep a lot of single people from being homeless but those days are gone now, thanks to scumbag lawyers who specialise in suing insurance companies.
    Mez
    6th Oct 2016
    9:41am
    Very good points there, BILBY!
    Mez
    6th Oct 2016
    9:38am
    This is something that I have written about in my previous comments in the past year.
    Older women are increasingly becoming homeless due to rising realestate prices caused by Chinese buyers as well as women on the average have been earning TWENTY PERCENT LESS THAN MEN IN AUSTRALIA!
    Rents have risen skyhigh yet PENSION RENT ALLOWANCE HAS ONLY INCREASED BY ONE MEASLY DOLLAR THIS YEAR!
    SHAME ON THD GOVERNMENT!
    Rent accounts for most of the pension, if not all if one finds a more comfortable and better condition accommodation!
    Lower wages for women have been caused by many of these elderly men who were in managements or in businesses and now they are the ones here who rave on about their super funds and houses they own and complain bitterly about everything and the government when these men have it REAL GOOD!
    SHAMEFUL!
    Mez
    6th Oct 2016
    10:22am
    Besides the increase of women becoming homeless including elderly women, no one has mentioned that there has also been a rise in WAR VETERANS BECOMING HOMELESS!
    Many of these are also suffering from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) which is comprised mainly of acute anxiety and depression as a result of their traumatic experiences when in Vietnam or Afghanistan.
    They also experience poor sleep, nightmares and selfmedicate with excess alcohol and or drugs then losing their families and home and of course their jobs IF they were able to find one.
    Also the rate of suicides are higher in returned war veterans than the total number of deaths on the battlefield or in action!
    Adrianus
    6th Oct 2016
    10:34am
    Yes, it's a real pity that Bill Shorten wasn't elected. He promised to halve the suicide rate but only if he was elected.
    Mez
    6th Oct 2016
    10:43am
    Frank....I'm disillusioned with the major parties and will vote Independents next time around. I was a swinging voter.
    Don't like Shorten and feel that Anthony Albanese would be a better leader who has a working class background from a single parent family whose mother worked hard.
    Malcom has to please the Nationals first unfortunately and the Greens are not practical enough.
    Adrianus
    7th Oct 2016
    10:06am
    Many people just don't understand the extraordinary lengths the left will go to in order to tug on our emotional strings. I'm sorry but to me it sounded like a cheap card trick.
    Hands up those who know someone who has committed suicide?
    That's tragic, nearly the whole audience!
    Well make me PM and I will drop that rate by 50%.

    Is nobody thinking ...why cant he do that anyway? As opposition leader? When I heard Shorten say that, it was at that moment he revealed his true self.

    The last time we gave Labor some extra power they had trouble stopping accidental deaths.
    Anonymous
    7th Oct 2016
    6:20pm
    how was he going to "halve" the suicide rate franks? execute half of them that feel suicidal?

    considering that returned servicemen get a repat pension AS WELL AS a disability or age pension. they get almost double what any other pensioner gets, more than double what people on the dole get, plus they get free dental, free lawyers, and many other benefits that pensioners dont get, including large cash grants on top of regular payments.

    almost all males in the generation before me served in ww2 including my father and uncles and my grandfather who served in ww1 and ww2, and they seemed to cope after the war. i think the high rate of alcoholism among returned servicemen is due to the traditional heavy drinking that goes with being in the army. i have worked with ex army guys who never served overseas and they drink very heavily, and just as much as the ones who served on active duty overseas. there is more to the "problem" than we know i think.

    i remember one prick who blamed his petty crime and alcoholism and drug addiction on the "horrors he had to put up with in vietnam". turned out the prick had never ever been in the army let alone served overseas ......

    the real vets i have met rarely if ever speak of their experiences in war. and they act pretty normal i think.

    7th Oct 2016
    9:14am
    sick and tired of hearing lowlifes say that we need turd worlders to "do the jobs that aussies wont do". it is total bs.

    i have worked with turd worlders and i have found them to be less capable than australians except for the youngsters who have never worked and roamed the streets for a few years and are not conditioned to working.
    although it isnt publicised, businesses get a bonus from the aussie taxpayer if they discriminate against australians and employ "diversified origin employees". this is discrimination against australians but apparently it isnt a problem, and not classed as such .

    if however on the rare occasion where an aussie gets the job over a non english speaking, illiterate immigrant THEN it is classed as discrimination.
    best way to fix the problem is to not give jobs to immigrants unless the employer can prove he cant get australian labour for the job. also there shouldnt be any welfare benefits to anybody who hasnt lived in the country for more than 15 years. that would get rid of the bogus "refugees" who come here for our pension benefits, despite not having contributed anything towards it.

    come on you sheeple! stop blindly agreeing with the government that there is a "labor shortage" and put it to the test, by making it illegal to employ foreign labour unless it can be proven that there is no australian labour available.
    instead of bleating agreement, complain to your unions about discrimination against australians, and complain to your politicians as well.
    union members in essential industries such as electricity, water, petrol, gas, etc should shut off supplies until the issue is dealt with. problem with that idea is that the unions are in bed with both the labor and the liberal parties and have been bought off by the creeps, using our tax dollars to do so.
    i dont believe that the majority of australians are fooled by that shit so why are so few of us complaining out loud? scared of being branded a racist? or a nazi? or a commo? or a fascist?
    Adrianus
    7th Oct 2016
    9:53am
    ha ha ha ha. that's funny bilby. The unions are in bed with the liberal party. he he he, do you have any evidence of this?

    7th Oct 2016
    5:45pm
    the best way to get rid of the homeless situation is to smash unemployment and make employment available for EVERYBODY. then cut out the dole and 95 percent of the homelessness will disappear over the horizon in no time.

    as for homeless pensioners, the only homeless pensioners are homeless by choice.
    i agree there is an acute shortage of FREE ACCOMMODATION, but if somebody is prepared to put their hand in their pocket each fortnight on payday and pull out 300 dollars for a fortnights rent, then accommodation isnt a problem, unless you want a place in toorak, or la perouse, or point piper, and expect a 4 bedroom mansion overlooking a beach, with its own private swimming pool and golf course.
    the vast majority of homeless people are homeless by choice. it wouldnt matter how much you paid them not to work because if you give them an extra 600 dollars a week they will simply spend an extra 600 week on their habit, be it gambling, drugs or booze or whatever. then they would complain that the "system stinks" and snivel that they need help urgently.
    most homeless people in city areas are obese because they can get 4 to 6 meals per day from different charities.

    the ones i feel sorry for are the ones who are institutionalised in psyche centres that have closed down, and they get the person a housing commission flat and expect them to budget and shop, and dodge the people who hound them on payday for money and cigarettes, and in some cases threaten them with violence if they refuse to hand over their money. i have seen people in this situation who leave their housing commission flat to get away from the scumbags who prey on them. when they end up homeless they have no clue how to save up for a bond on a private flat and set it up etc. these are the genuine homeless people.

    in the old days these people would have simply rented a room in a boarding house on a week to week basis, where they had communal kitchens and bathrooms and toilets, and these places were cheap, and usually clean and basically comfortable. however these places have shut down now because of scumbag lawyers suing them on a regular basis to the stage where insurance companies will simply not insure them. plus some state govts have introduced legislation enabling the lodgers to run the place and paying rent is a voluntary option, and the landlord no longer has any rights as such, so they are forced out of business. the end result is that many people are forced onto the street and simply dont have the life skills to set up a place of their own, or organise a share accommodation deal with other homeless people. depression sets in and they become alcoholics or junkies or both and they are then a lost cause.

    deliberately creating massive unemployment is obviously not fixing the problem and neither is excessive immigration. you dont see many (if any) homeless new arrivals though. they are given priority for housing commission places and jump in ahead of people who have been waiting for years.
    i have seen cases where people in housing commission have gotten a year or so behind on their rent, and the housing commission offers to forgive the debt if they will pay their rent on time in future. these scumbags will readily sign the agreement but still wont pay any rent, then they snivel when a court gives them 60 days notice to vacate. many of them trash the place before they leave out of spite.

    obviously this policy of forcing high unemployment figures "in order to create a healthier economy" is just as big a crock of shit as it was when they first introduced it. yet economic "experts" still teach university students that "in order to have a healthy economy you need a large pool of unemployed labor" to force the people with jobs to "work harder in order to avoid job loss" and refrain from "excessive pay increase demands". to an intelligent person this is obviously bullshit but the "experts" still agree that it is logic. these experts however have never had a real job or owned a business.
    Anonymous
    9th Oct 2016
    7:23pm
    mez
    you are right in that not ALL homeless are homeless by choice, but many, possibly majority, of them are. females in abusive situations have numerous women's shelters to go to, but not necessarily in the area they would choose.

    also, in most if not all states, emergency housing will arrange accommodation for you if you are really stuck, but only on a tempory basis. if necessary they will put you up in a motel or a hotel, but only for a limited time. you are expected to look for affordable accommodation while you are in the emergency system, but many people wont bother to look and will exploit the system for as long as they can. these people cant seem to put their hand in their pocket on payday and pay rent, preferring to keep their money for vices, such as gambling, drugs, booze etc. many of the homeless are smokers, and because of the heavy govt tax on smokes, plus the fact that most landlords wont allow smoking in rental accom, some smokers prefer to be homeless rather than go without a smoke.
    got to admit though, the dole has gotten behind, and people on the dole should get a substantial increase. at one time the pension and the dole were identical in pay amounts, until the govt started skipping rises for people on the dole and now the dole is about 520 per fortnight i think, whereas the pension is about 880 (these figures dont include rental assistance but that isnt a lot). 360 per fornight less than a pensioner isnt a liveable wage imho, but for many it is the only money they can get till they can bullshit their way onto an idiots pension, or get a job. jobs being scarce, plus immigrants getting preference for jobs makes it impossible for some people to get work no matter how hard they try. the steady stream of unneeded immigrants ensures this is a permanent situation and i think its a disgrace.
    saw on tv years ago there was a band of urban aussie gypsys who saved money on rent by living in their kombi vans. there was about 10 of them and they changed location every night. dunno if they are still doing it. other homeless people catch a train to an outer suburb like campbelltown and sleep on the station. one guy i met used to sleep on the trains, though he never bought tickets. he had heaps of warrants against him for fare evasion but he didnt care. many people live in their cars nowadays. i figure its a shame the lawyers forced closure of the rooming houses. they were always a good backup in the old days while you were looking for a place. for a relatively cheap rent you got a single room, share bathroom and kitchen, no bond to pay, and no bills such as electricity. usually sheets and blankets were provided, and laundered for you once a week. many people lived in them full time but they were good if you were a traveller or in need of tempory accommodation .
    shit, if i were young and starting out now, if i couldnt find a job i think i would either look for a mining job in the country, or leave australia. we age pensioners should be ashamed of ourselves in that our generation changed a once prosperous country into a third world shithole for young australians just starting out, and instead of urging the govt to fix the problem, we snivel about being "poor pensioners". in the meantime the govt tells us we have a "labor shortage" and desperately "need more migrant labor" and we may have to "work until we drop". meantime, the dole queues get longer, and despite transferring able bodied workers from the dole to the idiots pension, the unemployment problem continues to worsen. as far as i can tell, the only "labor shortage" is doctors and specialists, because of all the migrants they have to cater to, and only a minute percentage of migrants are doctors or specialists. sure we can train more doctors, but that doesnt help because the govt will continue to bring in more patients for them from overseas. the doctors probably believe there is "plenty of work" given that they dont have problems finding it.

    7th Oct 2016
    5:55pm
    well frank - if you will notice that the loudest silence comes from the unions when the govt does things to promote unemployment, like abolishing import taxes, and giving contractcs to overseas companies , and importing huge numbers of workers from the turd world for the aussie workers to compete with, its kind of a dead giveaway. only naieve sheeple who believe in santa clause really think the labor and liberal party are opposed to each other. the individual members of each party are best buddies behind the scenes and attend the same partys and often borrow each others wives and boyfriends behind the scene.
    when was the last (or even the first) time the unions ever admonished the government for exporting their members jobs overseas while importing massive numbers of workers from those same countries?
    its ok frank - i accept your apology mate. however in future, its probably best that you leave the thinking to the intelligent people, rather than blindly bleat agreement, like the rest of the sheeple, with your favorite political "celebrity". either that or learn to think for yourself ........
    Adrianus
    8th Oct 2016
    9:13am
    OK bilby, I'll leave all the thinking to you :)
    Mez
    7th Oct 2016
    11:40pm
    Bilby.......Agree with much of what you have stated but NOT that the homeless are there by choice.
    Some....yes buf onlg because that choics was better than to continue living in an abusive home!
    Don't be hard on them! Try to understand their lives from where they came from then give them a helping hand or two if you dare.
    vinradio
    9th Oct 2016
    5:06pm
    Did anyone see that program on TV about housing some female refugees, either single, or with children in a retirement village? It was in Eltham in Victoria, I think. There would be no single or perhaps any men, but it still seems an odd thing to do. Some suggest it is a grab for funding by the retirement home?
    ex PS
    9th Oct 2016
    7:58pm
    I wouldn't put it past them, retirement homes are there for one reason and that is to make money.
    LiveItUp
    10th Oct 2016
    7:31am
    Retirement homes are distressing places so would not be good for a genuie refugees mental health.
    Christine
    15th Sep 2017
    6:04pm
    I was one of the women on the SBS Insight show, Women on the Edge. I was disturbed by the lack of discussion on solutions so started a Facebook group to look at solutions. From that we have developed two main working parties, one to put up an information website for those at housing risk, and another to put together a viable proposal for privately funded affordable housing developments. If you are either homeless or confronting homelessness, come and join us at https://www.facebook.com/groups/HousingAlternativesAustralia/
    Mez
    25th Sep 2017
    8:42pm
    Well done!

    16th Nov 2017
    2:49pm
    The heading should be "Sick, older PEOPLE at risk of homelessness". I'm sick and tired of the gender card being played, particularly when males constitute the bulk of homeless people. Spare us the wimminist ideology.