30th Apr 2018

Age pensioners' housing woes worsen

Age pensioners' housing woes worsen
Leon Della Bosca

Australia’s housing affordability crisis worsens each year, and the latest damning report on rental affordability reveals how shockingly few affordable homes are available for age pensioners and low-income earners.

The Anglicare 2018 Rental Affordability Index takes a snapshot of thousands of properties listed for rent around Australia. It then measures this against the 14 types of households on low incomes. These include single parents, people receiving Disability Support Pensions, Newstart, the Age Pension and those earning minimum wage.

Of the 67,365 properties listed for rent across Australia, just over 1 per cent were affordable for a single person receiving the Age Pension and, perhaps more disturbingly, only three were affordable for a single person receiving Newstart.

Currently, there are around 250,000 Australians on a full Age Pension renting their home.

YourLifeChoices research shows that the largest source of income for 40 per cent of the 5500 respondents the Age Pension, and just under 10 per cent of them rent privately, with many saying they often run out of money prior to each pension payment.

The Anglicare report states: “The paucity of properties affordable and suitable for single people on the Aged Pension is cause for alarm. It reflects the flaws in the system, where the Aged Pension is now really only viable to live on if you are living in and have paid off your own home. Concerns about the sharp rise in the number of older women experiencing homelessness correlate with this finding.”

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, the number of homeless people between 2011 and 2016 rose from 102,000 to over 116,000.

 


Low-income earners and age pensioners are not only competing with each other for scarce accommodation, but also with the one in three Australians currently renting, many of whom are on much higher incomes.

“Australia’s housing market is a catastrophe so dire that it has become an international joke,” writes Executive Director of Anglicare, Kasy Chambers.

“Sydney and Melbourne now outstrip London, New York and Los Angeles for expensive housing.”

Rent prices have increased on average by 3.3 per cent across the country.

Anglicare puts the onus for this crisis on the Government’s policies that have, so far, only served to benefit housing investors.

According to the report snapshot: “The idea was that supporting people to invest in houses and rent them out through the private market would provide more homes more efficiently than governments directly building or subsidising low-cost public or other forms of affordable housing.

“But these policies haven’t worked. The result is that thousands of Australians have been priced out of either renting or buying.”

This too, is reflected in the rapidly rising number of elderly homeless people.

“People on the lowest incomes, who only have the option to rent, are the hardest hit. The Federal Government spends billions more on subsidising wealth accumulation for property investors than it does on public housing and homelessness services. We need to reverse this situation, and act now to create enough affordable and secure homes for people on low incomes, including those who are already homeless,” the report said.

How does this affect you? What proportion of your income do you pay in rent?

Related articles:
Over 55 and homeless
Housing system broken and unfair
Rent assistance – 20 March 2018





COMMENTS

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tisme
30th Apr 2018
11:05am
just me and adult disabled daughter now, rent takes up nearly all my carer payment living on daughters disability is a struggle with disability expenses on top of everything else. now my health issues means I am trapped in the house if I cant drive. we have 50.00 to much for govt housing. not a nice neighbourhood we were broken into. I fear the future so much I feel sick
jackie
30th Apr 2018
12:35pm
tisme...I am sorry to hear of your terrible plight but at least your are living in public housing...many low income Australians are on long waiting lists for public housing.

Australia needs to STOP spending tax payer money on useless causes such as $50 million on a Captain Cook statue. Such money could go toward building more public housing for the poor not the rich.
SuzeB
30th Apr 2018
12:53pm
A young person, acquaintance of mine, got a public housing property amazingly quickly. She even got an option of 2 places (one of which was pretty central!). She now lives in an almost new property. I think some 'conditions' get you up the queue quicker. This young person suffers from depression.
KB
30th Apr 2018
2:47pm
Tisme Sorry to hear of your plight At leats you have public housing.. Have you tried for a transfer?
AutumnOz
30th Apr 2018
4:39pm
tisme,
approach Anglicare or the Salvation Army in your area one of them should be able to put you in touch with a local organisation that may be able to help you with transport for both you and your daughter.
We are rural but I still have someone come and pick me up to take me to doctors appointments etc. it does cost money but far less than a taxi.
I am very sorry to hear you are in this predicament through no fault of your own and I feel the governments, both state and federal, have allowed too many people who desperately need help to fall through the cracks.
OnlyGenuineRainey
30th Apr 2018
6:05pm
I know a girl who has been faking disability for 30 years. She has a lifetime right to public housing in NSW despite having inherited more than $1 million recently. No wonder there is a housing crisis?
Tib
30th Apr 2018
8:27pm
Rainey didn't your parents warn you about bad company. You know some dodgy people.
Tib
30th Apr 2018
8:32pm
Rainey I have to say I've never met anyone who has been on disability for 30 years with a million dollars it must be just you and your friends. Perhaps you should call the police? Unless of course she knows something about you you would rather not share with the police?
jackie
1st May 2018
10:57am
OnlyGenuineRainey.....I doubt your friend has been faking their illness. Many people with mental illnesses do look normal and healthy.

If they did inherit $I mill recently advise them to move out and buy their own property. Maybe you can help them because mentally they may not be coping.
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
11:13am
No Jackie. Nothing wrong with this very cunning criminal. She has it all sewn up. What she has managed to achieve, by cheating a lot of people, is mind boggling. Her only 'mental' illness is an aversion to work.

Tib, I'm an orphan - so had no parents to teach me anything, but I don't keep bad company. This one disgusting individual happens to be a distant relative sadly, and I have as little to do with her as possible, but I have very detailed knowledge of how she lives
Antoinelechef
30th Apr 2018
11:26am
I am paying 48% of my income (pension) to rent a flat. The heating has never worked. I have mentioned this many times, only after a year has anything been done, an electrician came and said it needs to be replaced. Nothing since. I feel I'm only one rent rise from homelessness which is a scary prospect.
alpal
30th Apr 2018
2:05pm
good luck with getting any response from the owner / landlord.

New units nowadays do not have any screens to prevent flies and insects. Therefore you are unable to open a window for a cool breeze.

No eaves means that the sun is always beating down and hitting the windows.
SuziJ
30th Apr 2018
3:04pm
Why haven't you followed up on the issue with the agent? How long has it been since the electrician attended your home?

It's the owner's responsibility to provide you with working heating & cooling in the first place. If the appliance doesn't work, they are responsible for the repair.

Write a letter to the agent, saying that if the situation hasn't been resolved in say 4 weeks, you'll have no hesitation in taking the issue to the Residential Tenancies Tribunal (CTTT in New South Wales).

Then they may get off their backsides and fix it for you. The tribunal will make an order that the problem be rectified within a certain time. Certainly hope it's fixed before winter takes a hold.

Writing a letter should not be any reason for the owner to give you notice to quit your property.
Rae
30th Apr 2018
3:53pm
The owner probably has no idea. Agents can be a pain for tenants and landlords. I'd certainly have another word to the agent. They my have just paid the electrician and put it out of mind. Mention the CTTT if you get no set date for a replacement heater. Landlords have to replace broken appliances that are available at the time of tenancy.
Old Geezer
3rd May 2018
4:51pm
Give agent 7 days to fix and tell them if not fixed you will lodge a complaint with the tribunal. Agents hate going to the tribunal and will do whatever it takes to not go.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
11:35am
Overall government (lack of directional) policy thrusts, that rely on ever-increasing population numbers to keep up demand and upward pressure on housing prices are to blame. Governments do this at the behest of their mates in banking and the 'housing' industries, and because they themselves have a huge vested interest in continuing the upward disaster that is housing these days.

It's time for this nation to stop and draw breath, take a damned good look around, and for its 'leaders' to actually come up with some real future directions and not just more of their endless self-serving garbage.

A good first step would be to loosen their control over revenue and expenditure - put them on a fixed budget per department of around half what they currently dip from 'consolidated revenue' - and force them to come up with some real ideas for a change.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
11:36am
... and that's just me being nice, Paddy....
Rae
30th Apr 2018
12:55pm
Why anyone though neoliberalism( neo classical) economics would work this time when it's been tried over and over and always ends up the same way. A few filthy rich and lots of poverty.

The Treasury is empty unfortunately.

I suggest share house arrangements for those unable to afford accomodation alone and frugality because it's not over yet and it's not going to be fixed anytime soon.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
3:18pm
The ex was watching a show on TV last night - about the effects of Reaganism on many in the US economy - it seems that General Motors was laying off workers to cut costs so as to continue giving a dividend to shareholders.

Say what?

Neo-liberalism is what is currently destroying this nation's economy and its people - it's just another word for The Return Of The Robber Barons.
Nan Norma
30th Apr 2018
11:38am
It does make me kind of angry when there are so many "newcomers" living around me get dept of housing homes. One family (single mother) arrived with six children and was given a four bedroomed house and now they have two lovely cars etc and kids go to private schools.
How do they do it? I know they have to live somewhere.
SuzeB
30th Apr 2018
12:46pm
And that will probably happen even more when Labor get in and bring in more 'newcomers'. We know that's what they'll do, whatever they say.
Joybells
30th Apr 2018
6:10pm
Hi Nan Norma I feel same way as you. See it here all the time and fed up with it all. So many of us elderly-the same people that helped make Australia the great country she once was. Cannot seeing it getting better in my lifetime. I am thankful my husband and I have a nice little rental unit that our pensions allows us to have for life. He served his country in the Forces for years but today so many of our service men and women suffer the same way Enjoy your day
BrianP
30th Apr 2018
11:42am
Any further delays will push so many Aussies over the edge that this lucky country we used to know will be gone forever.

When will you see that this Government just makes pleasing noises and then continue with their policy of widening the rich and poor gap? Step one - get rid of the Liberals forever. Step two - pressure the others to make Governments more accountable. Demand policies that benefit people in need. Either a politician serves the people or he is out.
jaycee1
30th Apr 2018
12:28pm
BrianP. It doesn't matter which government is in nothing will change.
They can promise the earth when campaigning but as soon as either party gets in, suddenly all their promises get put in the 'too hard' basket.
Main excuse being the mess left by the last government - which is usually a load of codswallop. As long as they get their pay each fortnight very few of them care about anyone else.
jackie
30th Apr 2018
12:47pm
BrianP....Our Parliament of the very near future will be full of Asian and Indian descent senators...Let's hope they will do a better job than the lazy and stupid cockroaches we have now.
Foxy
30th Apr 2018
5:08pm
.... wake up and smell the roses/coffee! There is NO Lucky Country anymore! Done n dusted many years ago!!
Charlie
30th Apr 2018
11:47am
Some of the subsidized government housing is not the answer either, at least for aged pensioners.

1. Some of the government housing offices (this is Queensland) refuse to rent a small two bedroom flat to a single age pensioner. Two bedroom places must be rented to more than one person.
The fact that some two bedroom flats are cheaper than some one bedroom flats, is not taken into account. Furthermore there are very few one bedroom flats.

2. As far as housing is concerned, age pensioners get lumped together with other homeless people who live a completely different live style to the aged.
Older people end up living in housing areas with rowdy desperate families, where they can be bullied, have their peace disturbed or have things stolen from them.
jaycee1
30th Apr 2018
12:32pm
This always annoys me!
Are they saying that just because you are a pensioner that you are not allowed to have family visit and stay overnight.
Or in the case of family living interstate / overseas that they can't come and stay for a couple of weeks.
There should be NO single bedroom flats/units they should ALL have at least 2 bedrooms and it should not matter if it is one or two people staying in them.
Everyone should be entitled to have visitors stay with them at least part of the time.
Rae
30th Apr 2018
1:06pm
Everyone is entitled to do that jaycee1 but unfortunately they have to pay for it themselves. It's not fair but then not much is anymore.
SuziJ
30th Apr 2018
3:23pm
The same here in NSW - I'm on the housing list, but am only eligible for a single bedroom unit. I currently privately rent a 2 bedroom unit with a storage shed, for so much less than what housing want to charge me for a single bedroom unit.

I cannot live in anything less than 2 bedrooms. Where would my 30 year old disabled son stay when he visits me (on a monthly basis for a week at a time)? In the second room, of course! I also use the second room as an office. Where would I put m son, or my office if I was in a single bedroom unit? Housing just don't take this into account at all.

BTW I'm on a DSP, just waiting to receive the Age Pension in around 4 years and 8 months.
Annick
30th Apr 2018
11:54am
My husband and I pay 45% or our pension in rent. This includes a recent rise of $10 per week. We have our fingers crossed that the rent doesn't rise again the next time the landlord can raise the rent. We have been here 3 years and have reported a jet on the stove not working when we moved in and every inspection since and it is still not fixed.
jaycee1
30th Apr 2018
12:41pm
Annick, it took us just over 7 years to get a broken window fixed after the back door slammed due to the wind. [Huge window but only bottom bit broke]
When it was reported they said they would send someone out so my husband made a temporary wooden fix that was still there 7 years later.
Like with you, it was put on a list of faults and reported regularly, but nothing was done for years.
thommo
30th Apr 2018
11:55am
we have a really excellent landlord who has not put the rent up for 5 years,but i lose sleep at night wondering what will happen when he decides to sell,can't go bush cos wife doesn't drive,and would wanna be near our granddaughter,certainly couldn't live with her,rents around 3201 are $350 week plus,and we would never get a housing commission place,unless we live to 100!!what are we to do,od on prescription drugs?come on turnbull,do something constructive for the 250000 of us renting
KSS
30th Apr 2018
12:18pm
Public housing is a State not Federal responsibility. Take it up with the State and Territory Governments and local councils.
jackie
30th Apr 2018
12:40pm
The Federal Government does allocate State Governments with funds towards public housing, just like it does towards other needs.

The way land has been over inflated here. It would be a wise move for all Governments to invest in land and build more public housing.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
12:48pm
Hang ten a week of the recalcitrants until the rest get the message...
KSS
30th Apr 2018
2:21pm
So jackie, what do the States and Territories do with the money? And as you say the Federal Government pays 'towards' public housing, the rest comes from where? As I said take it to the State and Territory Governments.
Radish
1st May 2018
1:02pm
I honestly dont know why people buy houses and rent them out these days. It is Russian roulette as to what type of tenants you get. I know of two lots of couples who have had their homes trashed, useless property managers and it has cost them more in repairs than they ever got in rent.

They cannot wait to get rid of this property and invest their money elsewhere. They cannot stand the stress.

If there are less and less investors all the burden falls on state housing.
grego
30th Apr 2018
12:22pm
I live in thailand as i can not afford to live in Australia,here rent,electicity,water,internet,costs me around $75 a week depending on the exchange rates and love the food,i do not live in the holiday resort towns but can travel 2-3 hours to some of the best and quietest beaches,
jackie
30th Apr 2018
12:37pm
grego...good for you...it looks like many Australians will be forced to do the same soon.
Tib
30th Apr 2018
1:30pm
I'm a self funded retiree, retiring overseas may be a good plan. I hear it's getting harder to retire to Thailand , is that true?
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
3:20pm
I'm looking at a quiet European retreat..... as long as the Muslim hordes aren't permitted to over-run the place first.

Maybe Vlad Tepes had it right......
Tib
30th Apr 2018
3:33pm
Trebor me too but might be a bit expensive.
Allahu Akbar ....yep just kidding.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
4:17pm
Don't like heat and humidity... might have to do a bit of reno work... trouble with some is you have to employ Uncle Luigi to re-do your roof at ten times the going rate....
Tib
30th Apr 2018
8:24pm
I don't like the heat either but all the cooler climates are a bit expensive.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
9:05am
Look around - a few Brits are finding spots here and there. Need to choose your time of year to spend there, though. I know a couple who have it sorted - he has a home here, she one in Canada and they spend six months in each hemisphere.
Radish
1st May 2018
1:00pm
English couple in our probus club spend 6 months in the UK in a flat and the other six months here in Oz in a four x 2 bed house.

They would dearly love to settle here permanently but no go. This is the best they can do.
Old Man
30th Apr 2018
12:38pm
There is a shortage of housing, whether affordable or not, and the reasons are many and varied. Starting at the bottom, local councils have a lot to answer for. Some of them have an exorbitant fee structure around DA's as well as a list of inspections and condition which all add a cost to the proposed building. Developers, no matter what the public thinks of them, are businessmen who want to make a profit so any council costs are passed onto the buyer.

State governments also have too many regulations regarding the environment which mean that there are more inspections and fees involved and this also raises the costs of building. Again, these costs are paid for by the buyer. State governments also control release of land for building and are sometimes too slow in making the decision which slows down the housing market.

Federal governments have legislation that supports the investor, the one who gets negative gearing and the one who provides the rental accommodation. It has been shown that the majority of these people have one investment property, are full-time employed, earn less than $87,000pa and are trying to improve their retirement years. The federal government also controls immigration which has become a problem with both housing and employment. Australia is a generous country which, per capita, has a very high immigration rate compared to other countries. If we reduced immigration by 50%, we would still be right up there in the generosity stakes.

In short, it boils down to the simple fact that the market is, always was and always will be governed by the law of supply and demand. We need more housing, more for home buyers, more for mum and dad investors and more government for low income renters.
jaycee1
30th Apr 2018
1:07pm
Old Man, what you say is true there are too many restrictions when building but I also think that there are too many old building sitting empty that the government [state or federal] should be converting into flats/units for low income earners. Most of these are in major transport areas and would give more bang for their collective buck.

Immigration should be stopped altogether for at least 10 years while the country catches up with those already here. Housing transport etc could also play catch-up during this time.

When it restarts it should be capped at under 100 thousand, based on jobs that are needed, apprenticeships should be heavily advertised and going to university should not be advertised as the bees knees. An awful lot of people who graduate from uni are still jobless 3 years later and a lot of those who do have work are not in their chosen field.

Also taken into consideration should be deaths and births from the year before [ i.e 70 deaths - 50 births = 20 immigrants. Family reunions should not be counted separately either. [personally I don't think it should be allowed]
Before anyone jumps on the band wagon - I know many people who came to Australia 30, 40 years ago who, when they wanted to see their families, had to return to their homeland as family reunions were not allowed for them. So why is it different now?

Governments think short term not long term as they don't want the opposition to get credit for their ideas.

So stupid! who cares which party brought it in, as long as it's for the good of the country!
Rae
30th Apr 2018
1:11pm
Perhaps hefty taxes for holding empty properties would be a good idea as well. Those fines could be used to buy or build studio accomodation for single pensioners.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
3:26pm
I've long stated that part of the problem, OM, is the congregation of masses of masses in the major city arenas (sic - arena - gladiators), and the reality that places such as Syd-en-ey are surrounded by steep hills, rough country and mountains - except in one direction - what I call the Sydney to Canberra Corridor.

Even so - with this the only viable direction for expansion - there is next to no work there and commuting is becoming (digs at another favourite) more costly under privatisation of rail services, along with the simultaneous over-crowding of the road corridors.

So what is the solution?

Well - provide solid infrastructure to provide meaningful jobs - then look at how and when and where there can be an expansion of regions/arenas other than the greater metropolitan basins.

In the case of Sydney - the Western/Nepean* Basin is a serious trap for pollution, and it is well known that west of The Great Dividing Stranger's Place of Parramatta - respiratory problems abound.

(* as Rodney Rude says - they're so dumb out west it's called the N-N-N-Nepean....)...
Cowboy Jim
30th Apr 2018
3:30pm
jaycee1 - there is never any bang in a building commission housing buck. The rent hardly covers the maintenance as the Govt is expected to fix any damage no matter how it occurred. Owners look after their properties because they have to fund the repairs. no so for people in subsidised housing. A lot of us wouldn't mind living in a place where you only pay 25% of your income in rent.
Old Man
30th Apr 2018
3:39pm
Bit unfair Cowboy Jim, there are many low income people in government funded housing who are grateful and show their gratitude by looking after the property. I agree that there are some who don't respect the home provided by government but they are in a small minority.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
4:19pm
My sister is a 'houso' and she keeps an immaculate yard and home. Across the street has three feet high grass and a couple of dead cars..... you can lead a horse to water.....
George
1st May 2018
4:47pm
Laws of Demand and Supply - yes.
a. Too many foreigners (Chinese) inflating the market prices, and therefore rents as well. Add too many Immigrants as well.
b. Too many such properties left empty while such foreign investors wait for the next boom.
c. Too many Investor benefits for Negative Gearing (including by Politicians) further inflating the market prices, and therefore rents as well.

A few simple solutions could fix the above!!!
But, will that happen? ABSOLUTELY NOT - with either Liberal or Labor Govts.
The foolish electorate need to turf out these self-serving leeches by putting them last in preferences - to get solutions to this and other many issues. Otherwise, you deserve what you get!
SuzeB
30th Apr 2018
12:43pm
And what are Anglicare and other 'concerned' organisations doing about it? I don't see a rush to provide more low-cost rentals amongst their properties. As far as I can see, the only rentals that pop up within the aged care industry occur when properties are up for redevelopment. Then they restrict the intake to rentals only, leading up to redevelopment time and you can get on waiting lists, if you're lucky, and if you're even luckier you can even get a place before redevelopment begins. I'm in a month-to-month tenancy at one of those places. Notice to vacate can come at any time, I guess, at which time perhaps I'll find something affordable at the back of Bourke.
Chris B T
30th Apr 2018
12:45pm
There is a Rental Assistance that Homeowner's Do Not Reecive But Homeowner Expences are high.(In All Areas)
The non Homeowner Is Allowed $200,000 more in Assets, if Non Homeowners are so Badly off way would they need The Extra Assets. There living in Bedsits can't afford Utilities, food , car running costs. A moment away from living on the Streets, what are they going to do with there Extra Assets Then.
Rae
30th Apr 2018
1:19pm
Basically the major cities are now unaffordable. There are workers who can't afford to live in our cities.

Holding expensive assets that don't earn income is being discouraged.

Otherwise people would buy up expensive cars, boats, motor homes, even gold and claim a pension.

People need to cut spending and save extra and that is very hard but it is the result of decades of poor policies and over spending.

There are even areas now where a homeowner will not be able to afford if they rely only on the aged pension because of those high costs of home ownership.

People will have hard decisions as the Government and the Country is broke.
vinradio
30th Apr 2018
1:34pm
I am lucky, as I live in a unit provided by a church charity, one bedroom, but all mod cons, except aircon, which I put in myself. My rent is tied to the Age pension, and it is expected residents should be able to apply for Rent relief and all concessions available for those over 65. I considered moving overseas, but in most countries like Bali and Thailand, the medical care is not great, and I have a number of medical problems. I also would be away from family. I also think you have to keep travelling back to Oz to get visa renewed, though not clear on those details. Moving here has made my life as a pensioner quite bearable, even able to have a holiday once a year! All outside maintenance is done for us, and inside as well, I don't pay for water, only electricity. The location is within walking distance of public transport (I don't have a car), and a very good shopping centre is 5 minutes walk away. of course i only found this accomodation after a lot of research and I had to be on a waiting list for 2 years, but the best move I ever made!
neil
30th Apr 2018
1:40pm
THERE USED TO BE A FDERAL GOVERNMENT DEPRTMENT DEDICATED TO HELPING US O.A.P.s WITH HOUSING PROBLEMS BUT THAT MR. ABBOTT WITH THE ASSISTANCE OF MR.HOCKEY GOT RID OF IT IN ORDER TO GIVE TAX FREE STATUS TO THEIR SALARY PACKAGING COMPANY CHUMS.
NEIL.
GrayComputing
30th Apr 2018
1:46pm
NO ASSET TEST FOR A PENSION EVERV AGAIN!

It is time for to take action for human decency and a achieve a huge stress reduction for pensioners.

Ii is time for ALL OF US to fire some large angry volley at your local MP and senator over pensions.

A pension is not welfare.
Most economist say we will save taxpayers money by dropping asset testing because of the massive overheads and cost overruns in running Centrelink and the 10,000 conflicting rules

Even poorer New Zealand has a NO ASSET pension so it is in fact cheaper and user friendly to go this way ,

For the retired and retiring people in your electorate do you think they really look forward and want 100++ visits to/from Centrelink and be part of 3 million waiting queues and lost calls?

Do MP really like being part of the system that allows this indirect abuse of the elderly?

This abuse is actually sponsored by our government and forced down to Centrelink and borders on a criminal act.

Why do our MPs normally compassionate persons let this Centrelink abuse happen at taxpayers’ expense?

MPs stand to lose being part of the government unless all these criminal asset tests for a pension are dropped now.

NO ASSET TEST FOR A PENSION EVER AGAIN!

So far I have send over 100 e-mails to the PM MP and senators
And will do lots more
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
6:05pm
Well done, GrayComputing. Bet you are not getting much in the way of thoughtful response?
Suze
2nd May 2018
12:19pm
Agree GrayComputing
If they had a Universal Pension ...they could get rid of Centrelink which costs a fortune.
kinkakuji
30th Apr 2018
1:47pm
If you are an older senior citizen and can no longer take care of yourself and need Long-Term Care, but the government says there is no Nursing Home care available for you, what do you do? You may opt for Medicare Part G.
The plan gives anyone 75 or older a gun (Part G) and one bullet. You may then shoot one worthless politician.
This means you will be sent to prison for the rest of your life where you will receive three meals a day, a roof over your head,
central heating and air conditioning, cable TV, a library, and all the health care you need. Need new teeth? No problem.
Need glasses? That’s great. Need a hearing aid, new hip, knees, kidney, lungs, sex change, or heart? They are all covered!
As an added bonus, your kids can come and visit you at least as often as they do now!
And, who will be paying for all of this? The same government that just told you they can’t afford for you to go into a nursing home.
And you will get rid of a useless politician while you are at it. And now, because you are a prisoner, you don't have to pay any more income taxes!
Is this a great country or what?
Now that you have solved your senior Long-Term Care problem, enjoy the rest of your week!
Rae
30th Apr 2018
2:21pm
Attempting to rob a bank would work. Rob them go to jail. They rob you they get a bonus. Strange world.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
3:34pm
"Power always thinks it has a great soul and vast views beyond the comprehension of the weak, and that it is doing God's service when it is violating all His laws."

- John Adams.

What greater power is there in this day and age then the power to control money? Abuse of such power has devastating consequences for the many - and that includes bad bosses who ill-treat and kick out workers etc, and government who sqander publicly needed funds on their pet schemes first and foremost .... and is exactly why all power must have checks and balances.

"Some rob you with a six-gun, and some with a fountain pen."

- Woodie Guthrie.
Raphael
30th Apr 2018
2:45pm
hard to have sympathy for people who insist on living in Sydney or Melbourne when they are on a pension and dont own a house
just move to a cheaper city/town/country and live well
AutumnOz
30th Apr 2018
5:00pm
Country towns are also a lot nicer to live in than Sydney, Melbourne or Brisbane.
Foxy
30th Apr 2018
5:18pm
...... just another pathetic moronic reply from you eh Raphael? Try to get some compassion in ya' boring life and stop "generalising"!

You don't know people's (often dire) circumstances - so pull ya' head in!!!!
OnlyGenuineRainey
30th Apr 2018
6:01pm
Um... hang on a minute here, Foxy. I am not lacking in compassion, but as a homeowner funding my own retirement I have to live where I can afford to live. I get NOTHING from the government, despite high costs for rates, insurance and maintenance. Why should renters be funded by taxpayers to live where they please? Why are renters entitled to preferential treatment, while those who struggled for 30+ years to pay a mortgage - often despite far greater hardships - get NOTHING and have to live where they can afford to?
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
6:56pm
Because they grew up there, Rainey... and their family and friends are all there?
Rae
1st May 2018
8:40am
What did people think would happen when all those tax cuts and privatisations emptied the Treasury?

TREBOR it can often be just a short move to a cheaper area that is affordable.

People could at least explore options. Share houses is another way people may be able to afford to live in an expensive area.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
9:15am
Depends - when talking about rent, it's not so easy for an inner city person to get cheaper without moving a long distance, and a lot of people (myself included) would dread sharing a house.

I think the answer lies in undoing and reversing the current trend in property ownership, by ensuring that only genuinely viable propositions get by the banks. I've said many times - you simply do not gain 'equity' in a property within a couple of months after putting a deposit on it - and this high wire act by the banks in betting on the futures market is fraught with danger for all.

The morality of government, especially elected representatives, in promoting and supporting such a scheme for personal benefit is another issue - but a very real one.

Anyway - if only genuine and solid proposals went by the banks (who would lose money - sorry 'bout that), it seems to me the price of property would fall, and thus rental costs.

You simply can't force aged pensioners to get out of their long-established home and be gulaged to some strange place, often surrounded by ne'er-do-wells in some estate or the modern version called the vertical slum - and think this is a good thing to do to anyone.

People are not just lumps of clay to be pushed around some politician's chess board, as some would have it.

the sooner we get rid of these neo-cons and globalists the better.

I'm working on holding a public meeting (or two) prior to the next election in this seat - where each and every local candidate will be given five minutes to expound on what they plan to do for this electorate and nation. Trying to get away from the media coverage of only 'the big two', which coverage means that the public mind is lead to think they are the only game in town.
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
11:32am
Trebor, I don't care where they grew up or where their friends are. If they want my kids to pay their bills for them, they can bloody well accept and be grateful for what the taxpayer can afford. They are NOT ENTITLED to a level of support that enables them to enjoy a lifestyle that people who pay their own way cannot access.
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
4:44pm
BTW. I had to move away from my family, and I'm not happy about it, but I couldn't afford the luxury of living in the expensive area that they live in. If it's good enough for someone who gets NOTHING from the government, after decades of hard work and paying tax, it's good enough for those who are supported by the taxpayer.
KB
30th Apr 2018
2:49pm
Suzieb I h am an older person and have medical conditions and am on higher priority waiting list. Ended up netting through friends. I am grateful for good friends. Housing Trust has let me down and other people seem to take priority such as younger people.
SuziJ
30th Apr 2018
2:50pm
I live in a rural city and have no problems with rental prices. None of these exorbitant prices, but from $140 - 180 pw for a decent 2 bedroom unit to rent!

I don't know where these figures are obtained from, but it's certainly not anywhere near where I live.
Raphael
30th Apr 2018
2:58pm
Good for you SuziJ
that extra $200 a week you save goes a long way

Pensioners expecting taxpayers to fund their city lifestyle are just plain selfish
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
3:37pm
Pensioners have the right to live in their place of choice near their family and friends and where in most cases, their roots are.

Perhaps the government should say then - "Oh - you want to down-size by moving four hundred miles away from family to a cheap rental? OK - we'll kick in for fortnightly free travel to visit family and friends for you...."
Cowboy Jim
30th Apr 2018
3:37pm
SuziJ - that is the case here, 200 km inland from where I live the rentals are as you mention. If I did not own a unit that's where I would move to. Rents here are $380 and up, was hard to get a place but then I did not have a color TV till 10 years after color came in.
SuziJ
30th Apr 2018
3:42pm
But I don't have $200 pw extra. Do you think that I'd be paying any less for food, electricity & fuel, just because I live in a rural city? It's actually more expensive! The staples are the same price as in the major cities, but food such as meat & veges and personal items (toiletries) are more expensive.

Our fuel starts @ around $135 up to $1.50 cpl. Certainly not cheap by city standards.

Only by very frugal budgeting and paying my electricity on a fortnightly basis am I able to afford to pay my electricity account.

I don't smoke, drink alcohol, gamble or wear make-up, so I'm glad that I don't have to worry about these 'non-essential' items.
Raphael
30th Apr 2018
3:49pm
SuziJ - I meant if you lived in the city, you'd be paying an extra $200 a week in rent

Trebor - your leaner mentality is an offence to all hardworking taxpayers
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
4:22pm
Rubbish - nothing 'leaner' about saying pensioners have the right to live in their own home and near friends and family. where do you get such silly and petulant ideas?

Something wrong with you, boy. Sounds like you are the leaner in the same vein as Fat Joe the sucker of cash for life for doing nothing but be fat and stupid.

You obviously don't understand taxpaying, either.... been explained to you many times but you refuse to learn.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
4:23pm
Force the fat cats to down-size and move to the bush where it's cheaper, and they can put the difference into a common fund to repay for some of their benefits through life....

How's them apples? No likee shoe on other foot? My shorts are in the oven and just about ready...
Raphael
30th Apr 2018
5:39pm
Yes you’re a leaner - expects by taxpayers to fund spoilt lefties like you because you’re too precious to move to a lower cost town to save on rent
OnlyGenuineRainey
30th Apr 2018
5:52pm
I sympathize with the disadvantaged, but I struggle with complaints about rent costs because homeowners are being slugged heavily to live in their own home after 30+ years of struggling to pay off a mortgage, and it seems to me people who didn't bother with the mortgage struggle are being rewarded with extra handouts from the taxpayer. Yes, they paid tax, but so did those who own homes and so did those who don't get a pension. Why do we reward irresponsible behaviour? I guess because it's impossible to distinguish irresponsible from genuinely disadvantaged, which is disturbing because the vast majority of pensioner renters were irresponsible.

I think the only fair approach is a universal aged pension paid at the same rate to all.

As for being forced to move into cheaper areas, sorry Trebor, but I agree with Raphael. A homeowner has to live where they were able to afford to buy. They don't get a government subsidy to choose their preferred location. They don't get any help at all with the cost of accommodation. Why should renters be subsidized to live where they want? Yes, it's hard to have to move to a less-than-desirable location. It's hard to have to move to a less-than-desirable home. But those who saved and tried to be independent have to live with what they can afford. Those who struggled with mortgages for decades have to live with what they can afford. I really don't see why renters should get preferential treatment.
Kathleen
30th Apr 2018
6:01pm
Raphael, are you using the word, ‘leaner,’ as a disparaging term? That is how LNP described poorer people and I have not heard that term for a while. It is discriminatory! It was frowned on and dropped because it is an unacceptable way to refer to anyone.
Why should you dictate where people live? I don’t want to live in the middle of a busy city but others choose that to be near what they know.
OnlyGenuineRainey
30th Apr 2018
6:46pm
So, Kathleen, I have to spend hundreds of dollars every week on rates, maintenance, home insurance, etc. to live where I can afford to, in a home I can afford with ZERO pension, because I spent 3 decades going without to pay off a mortgage and saving, but my children are supposed to fund handouts for people who didn't pay off a mortgage and save to live exactly where they choose? Sorry, I don't see that as reasonable at all.

I don't like the term ''leaner'' and I am not lacking in compassion for those few who were genuinely disadvantaged, but my kids are paying for gamblers and drinkers and folk who indulged in expensive holidays and other luxuries I never enjoyed to now pick and choose where they live, while I have to accept accommodation I can afford, however unsatisfactory it might be. I can't see anything wrong with those relying on the public purse to have to accept whatever the public purse can afford, since the rest of us have to live within our means.
Raphael
30th Apr 2018
6:50pm
Kathleen - suck it up sunshine
I would like to live in Sydney but cant afford to sell my house and buy an equivalent one
I think I should be able to live where I want - so I demand the government make up the difference in cost of me selling up and moving . Thos is applying yours and Trebors warped logic

OGR explained it clearly. If you and Trebor can't see that, then the "leaner" term describes you both to a tee
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
6:51pm
DUH, Rafe - I live in the bush and own the house - and I'll repeat it in small words so you can get a grip on it - pensioners (big word) have the right to stay where they want and close to their friends and family.

Fat Joe came up with 'lifters and leaners' (should've been lifters and learners for the same group since they've got such a lot to learn) - and he never lifted anything but his fat arse to pick up another free cheque.

On the other hand, I worked 100+ hours, have done military service, have done far more than any of you (I can safely say), am well known as an exceptional performer, and continue to work now in retirement.

Quite frankly - how dare a dope in the order of Fat Joe even suggest that pensioners who wish to stay in their own homes or near their friends and family are being subsidised by anyone else?

Once more for the economic illiterate - EVERYBODY pays tax every time they spend or move money in any way - income tax is just one way of moving money.

On yer bike, laddie...... we don't do Fascist legends in their own lunch-time here.
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
6:53pm
My heart bleeds for you Rafe - we're not talking about wanting to move to the big smoke - we're talking about people who've lived there all their lives, and who you now call bludgers for wanting to stay there where they are 'in their comfort zone'.
Raphael
30th Apr 2018
7:04pm
comfort zone my arse,
you cut your coat according to your cloth

the bludgers in expensive rental accomodation never learnt the simple rule when they were working - that's why they are too precious to move towns . Even in retirement , they havent learnt to budget and live within their means. And people like you and Mick want to take from those who battled, worked hard and saved. Youre a disgrace
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
7:56pm
I don't want to take anything from anybody - unlike your good self...... and I would prefer that government, such as it is, develop meaningful policies for work the the majority in real jobs, cut out their personal little schemes that they feel they have the right to spend billions in public money on, and develop a genuine infrastructure for this nation - along with dumping the opportunity for people to invest on next to no real equity in serial housing - as opposed to homing.

THAT is what is driving the cost of homing and renting up - and what is causing such as you to not be able to sell up and move to the big city (god knows why).

You sound terribly paranoid about people wanting to take from you - and you are deeply mired in the politics of envy over pensioners being simply able to live in the area they are comfortable with.

I suppose you would Raus them all on to the trains and dump them in neo-Siberia....

You have zero idea what people may have gone through to end up in rental in retirement.... no idea at all - and nobody set you up as the judge, either.

By all means - sell up and buy in the city - then work your way to ownership again.... but you have no right to criticise those who live there already and have the right to remain close to family and friends.

Try beer instead of vinegar - it sweetens your outlook..... and cures Optical Rectalitis.... a dire condition where the nerves to the eyes become crossed with the nerves to the anus and give one a.. well... different ... outlook on life....
Kathleen
30th Apr 2018
8:07pm
Raphael, like Trebor, I do not live in Sydney or Melbourne or any other big city. But, unlike you, I do not judge those who cannot move because of family commitments or access to medical services or any reason. People have a right to choose where they live and how they live. I am sure they are not referring to such places as the Sydney harbour or waterfront places. Those kinds of places are not within most people’s reach. The derogatory term, leaner, should not be in your vocabulary.
Tib
30th Apr 2018
9:39pm
Raphael I agree with you. I believe in supporting the poor, but I don't believe the government is required to support you in the lifestyle of your choice.
Tib
30th Apr 2018
9:49pm
Moving big deal , i can't remember how many times I've moved. You lot are being a bit precious. Moving wouldn't be in My top 20 as far as hard decisions. You need to toughen up princess.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
9:20am
Moving to many country towns means you go on a waiting list for doctors, and often the major hospitals are a long way away - an added cost to the 'budget' for transport etc. To travel for specialist treatment, people can be paid per km and for accommodation - so it seems that it might just be better to keep people close to what they know and are used to.

Every silver lining has a cloud within it...
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
11:09am
Trebor, I moved to a country town because I couldn't afford to live in the city. By moving, I was able to pay out my mortgage. I have high costs to travel for health care and NOBODY contributes to those costs. Nor do I get ANY government help. Bugger off with your expectations that my kids should pay for pensioners to enjoy luxuries I can't afford. When you rely on the public purse, you should accept and be grateful for what the public purse can afford to provide. I am not without compassion, and I know all about hardship, but to suggest that pensioners are entitled to benefits that SFRs can't afford is insulting and disgracefully selfish.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
12:04pm
Rainey - have you tried IPTAAS? They may fund some of your travel, and I agree that some SFRs are very badly done by.

That's part of the whole problem area in governance that needs to be addressed, and is not being addressed under the current global economy neo-conservative approach.
Old Man
30th Apr 2018
3:20pm
Another misleading article! The Anglicare report specifically mentions the Sydney area as having the 1% affordability problem yet Leon tells us:

"Of the 67,365 properties listed for rent across Australia, just over 1 per cent were affordable for a single person receiving the Age Pension and, perhaps more disturbingly, only three were affordable for a single person receiving Newstart."

C'mon Leon, lift your game mate, don't print information that is misleading. I would have used the term "lying" but I have no proof that you set out to deceive so you get the benefit of the doubt.
Rocky
30th Apr 2018
3:20pm
I live in a caravan park I have no assets and I am on a disability pension I always run out of money before the next payment 50% of the pension goes in rent I never thought I would end up like this and I can't see me living like this I would rather die sooner than live like this for another 15 to 20 years never enough money to pay for health operations so have to put off these things, no money for repairs to the car I don't expect the government to pay for these things but I don't know what to do I am too old to work and my lack of health would prevent that I really can't see a way out of it
Radish
4th May 2018
12:59pm
Rocky I am very sorry you are in that situation.

You are the type of person who should be getting the help FULL PENSIONERS ....not the ones who manipulate the system .
Knows-a-lot
30th Apr 2018
5:13pm
Two solutions:
1. End ALL immigration NOW;
2. Have governments legislate to put caps on private rentals.
Raphael
30th Apr 2018
6:52pm
how about nationalise all housing as well ?

commo twit
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
8:01pm
How about privatise everything?

Robber Baron twit........ bring back the company store..... scraps for the orphans and pensioners from the Parliamentary dining room......

During the Potato Famine(s) in Ireland, in the dead of winter, the local people made their way through the snow to the castle of the Lord Sligo, to beg for sustenance in Winter. He locked the gates....

Would you have us do the same here and now in this land where there is more than enough to fatten the likes of Fat Joe and Co - losers all who have not one idea what Lifting means in reality - but they sure have a mouth and an ego.

Joe left town before the Royal Commission into financing.... wonder if they'll catch up with him......

I'd love to see that...... brought back in chains from The Americas and condemned in the dock......
OnlyGenuineRainey
2nd May 2018
9:01am
Capping rentals will only reduce the stock of available housing. People are not going to buy houses to rent out if they can't set the rent to achieve an adequate profit. A better solution would be to tighten the laws that protect against bad tenants. I know landlords who rented out good houses at fair rent but sold them because they simply couldn't protect themselves adequately against tenants who trashed their houses and defaulted on rent. One landlord I know replaced all the taps in the house and had the plumbing system fully upgraded and then the tenant broke the kitchen and laundry taps and made a complaint to the RTA asking them to fine the landlord. Fortunately, the landlord had kept careful records, because the stupid agent took the tenant's side - angry that the landlord had not used the agent's preferred supplier who was charging 20% more and paying the agent a commission.

Life isn't all peaches and cream for landlords either. It's easy to paint them as the bad guys, but many worked very hard for what they have and are struggling to achieve a fair return on their investment.
Sadie
30th Apr 2018
5:13pm
I pay almost half my Pension on rent, And it is likely to go up again on renewal of lease. I live in North Qld. I really feel for those i capital cities, I know it is worse for them.
GregH
30th Apr 2018
6:55pm
In 2011, in Melbourne, I was paying $340 a week rent for a run-down 2 bedroom townhouse. Trying to pay $680 a fortnight rent out of c. $850 a fortnight disability pension was impossible. That didn't leave enough to pay electricity, gas, phone, and to run a car. I was having to scrounge for wood on the side of the road for heating. Medications - can't remember how I managed to pay for them. Oh and food? What's that? Now I am living in a small, cluttered and cold room in the back of a friend's place where the cracked windows leak but I can afford to buy my meds and food now. As an extremely well qualified teacher, I never imagined that I would end up living like this.
Kathleen
30th Apr 2018
8:12pm
A story like yours Greg should make some detractors on here understand people’s situations happen through no fault of their own.
Hope life treats you kinder in future and you at least have some heating and even some repairs to your room.
GregH
30th Apr 2018
8:43pm
I have no assets because I lost my wife to cancer just before I got sick. The CBA broke their own rules and forced me to sell our house at a loss. It left me with nothing and 3 children to raise on my own. We have all survived but having to "retire" at 41 with no assets leaves me depending on the pension for the rest of my life. It is hard.

It really angered me a couple of years ago when several Federal politicians announced that they could not live on the pension but then just a few weeks later voted themselves a $45,000 a year pay rise - equivalent to more than two age pensions!! That was just offensive to every pensioner in the country.
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
11:20am
GregH, I feel for you, and you are precisely the kind of person I think should be helped generously. The problem is that you live among thousands of bludgers and spendthrifts who claim equal disadvantage (falsely, of course!) and want the help you ARE entitled to, due to your circumstances. The taxpayer can't support everyone, and it seems it's impossible to reliably determine who is deserving and who should be kicked in the butt and told to lie in the bed they made with their irresponsible lifestyle. I wish I knew of a way to help people like you.

I agree with you about politicians. They are a disgrace.
Bes
30th Apr 2018
7:10pm
We cannot bank on the government using common sense. We constantly hear about how the Australian Aged Pension may come to an end and Pensioners may also be forced to sell the family owned home as the Government could run OUT of money.
How come we never hear of the TRUE costs of WELFARE of bringing in refugees, some with TWO WIVES or of FOREIGN AID running out of money?
When you think about it, a majority of the electorate WORKED, paid tax, paid a mortgage to buy their home while FUNDING the other TWO?
And how about keeping check on ALL tax free money collected in the name of religious charities going offshore?
Some religions own businesses……tax free?
TREBOR
30th Apr 2018
8:07pm
Typical of losers to target pensioners - as I've said many times - it is the entire spread of government spending that needs to be PROPERLY (proviso brought to you courtesy of the laughable Commission of Idiots) reviewed and looked at under the microscope.

It is NOT pensions and social security that are sending this nation to the knacker's yard - it is the entire gamut of government spending on often luxury items, such as PPL, childcare subsidies, double dipping by property investors in negative gearing and then concesssional capital gains, and other things that only serve to sustain the rise and rise of costs of living, rather than assisting anyone in reality.

Every time the 'government' gives a $50Bn contract to some overseas corporation - that $50Bn is GONSKI - and there is NO reciprocal contracting being offered to Australia.

Sending billions to France to build warships is lost money from this economy - and under no circumstances whatsoever is there any possibility of France letting a contract to Australia for $50Bn or anything else.

Now that is the kind of spending like drunken sailors that incurs generational debt, not paying the bills due and paid for, such as social security.
MD
30th Apr 2018
9:03pm
Low life's, parasites, spongers and leeches the lot of em ! Well that's my take of everyone blameworthy for this fiasco - at least according to you lot. Everyone that is except the bleedin hard done by downtrodden self professed (seeming) destitutes herein, some of whom have the temerity to expect - EXPECT mind you, the number of rooms, location, instant availability and affordable rents on their terms - of the government supplied/subsidized housing.
Everyone else is to blame for their plight, be it; gubbermint - thus all pollies, housing authority, landlord(s), immigrants, banks and/or developers. Social largesse meanwhile, is readily available jointly or separately through or by most any of the above parties.
A grateful few ? No way Jose', as it seems the package total (ie, ALL add-ons inclusive) of benefits is inadequate.

Churches and religious institutions are tax exempt and in addition some regularly apply for and receive govt funding for presumed charitable works. Some churches and church affiliated bodies own rental properties (articles about some such "slums" occasionally surface in print medium). As charities are ever quick to rise to the defence of the homeless and hard done by then perhaps this housing/rental problem should be incorporated within their 'duty of care' - with govt oversight of course. After-all, they do manage to successfully run and financially manage expensive schools.
Big Brother supplies the (taxpayer) funds, churches (includes Muslim) build the requisite accommodation and are responsible for allocation and management thereof.

Then sit back and wait for the lamentations when some herein are allocated a flat/unit in an area of their choosing but administered by a body of heathens/infidels.
It might almost seem as though beggars are entitled to be choosers these days.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
9:27am
Well - I suppose everyone could have been on a lifetime income guarantee that would provide a home of their own and a little extra for investment etc... that would mean that nobody would fall on hard times, or lose a job, or lose their investments through poor financial advice, or suffer when ill or injured, or go down when enduring divorce and such.........

That would solve all of your issues above.... wouldn't work, but hey - if you want everyone to not have needs...... become a good socialist... let the government control every aspect of your life.

It's either that or you ensure that people are treated reasonably and have the basics and a little comfort zone.

Are you suggesting that your grandmother, who most likely stayed home to raise the family and protect home and hearth, should be thrown to the wolves or exposed on a hillside in winter, since she has not 'earned' her way and is thus a 'leaner'.

We have a 'lifter' advocate here - seems to me that if he can't afford to move to the city and plays politics of envy over pensioners who've lived there all their lives, he didn't do a whole lot of lifting at all.... and so would appear to be a 'wannabe lifter'... one of Fat Joe's kind who wouldn't know what a real lift was.... unless it was another heist out of the taxpayer's pocket.
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
11:17am
Trebor, I think your ''lifter'' accusations are as vile and disgusting as calling people ''leaners''. And yes, pensioners CAN move to affordable locations. If they want subsidies from taxpayers who are struggling to afford the accommodation of their choice, and SFRs who are stuck with what they can afford, these precious little ENTITLED darlings can bloody well take what is offered and be grateful. How dare they demand better than those who are paying the bills for them? Selfish in the extreme! But I guess they'll finally be content when everyone is as broke as they are and the country is totally stuffed. I hope they understand that when that happens, there will be NOTHING for the pensioners. It won't be a case of ''I expect to be able to live here''. Rather it will be a case of ''find a rock to shelter under if you can''.
melbgirl
1st May 2018
11:17am
Trevor, thanks for pointing out that things happen in life, we don't choose to lose a partner or become ill.
Many of us work hard whether in the home or workforce; often on low pay or as a homemaker and don't have the ability to purchase a home or other assets.
As a young widow with dependant children working full time I couldn't get a housing loan, despite rent being higher than repayments would've been. I focussed on giving my kids a good education, they are now contributing members of society paying high taxes and unlikely to ever be able to buy their own homes of any kind.
I am still renting, due to my medical condition moving away from the city isn't an option, regular trips to major hospital required.
Even in good health most single older people would struggle to set up new lives, support networks, access to services moving to cheaper areas in addition to being away from families.
Homeowners have choices to downsize/release equity etc which renters do not. If you are in the fortunate position of owning your own home please show some compassion to those who are not so lucky, we didn't all live the life of riley.
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
11:26am
Oh come on now, melbgirl! You had my sympathy for a while, until you got to the part about your children paying high taxes and unable to ever be able to own homes of any kind. CRAP!

ANYONE in Australian earning enough to pay high taxes CAN buy a home. Tell them to stop dining out and buying coffees, forget holidays for a few years, and put 10% of their income into a savings account. If they are paying high taxes, they can probably easily afford 20%.

And shove your ''downsize/release equity'' up your backside! How dare you suggest home ownership has anything to do with LUCK? That's rude and insulting. A lot of homeowners didn't have the ''life of riley'' either. Many did it VERY VERY TOUGH, especially when paying 18%+ interest. But they don't get to stay in the city because it suits them. They move to cheaper areas so they can remain self-funded and the government has more to give to people like you. So just be grateful for whatever help you get and stop claiming entitlement to have better than those who are paying your way. I have medical condition also, but I can't live in the city. I just have to suck it up and ride buses.
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
11:29am
Frankly, melbgirl, I have little sympathy for you. If you went without to educate your children, they should now help you out. If they earn enough to pay high taxes, tell them to buy a house with a granny flat attached so you can live close to them. Don't tell me it's not achievable. If they earn enough to pay high taxes, they earn enough to pay their way and help you out a little. If not, they need to learn how to manage their money properly.
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
11:29am
Frankly, melbgirl, I have little sympathy for you. If you went without to educate your children, they should now help you out. If they earn enough to pay high taxes, tell them to buy a house with a granny flat attached so you can live close to them. Don't tell me it's not achievable. If they earn enough to pay high taxes, they earn enough to pay their way and help you out a little. If not, they need to learn how to manage their money properly.
melbgirl
1st May 2018
12:08pm
Thanks for your input Rainey. I know it was tough to buy a house back in those days, my husband and I went without to pay the mortgage at 14.9 fixed. The bank refused to refinance to me after his death. As for luck, I meant not having bad life events such as death or illness over which one has no control.
My kids have no hope of buying houses/flats within 100k of work; HECs repayments, high rental costs, no coffee or smashed avocado either, no security of tenure in today's contract world. Not at all uncommon with people under 35 these days, and I don't want their help, my reward will be them having good lives.
Further, you are making assumptions, I did not complain about my situation and do not expect better than anybody else. What I do expect is for those who are in a better position to show compassion for others.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
12:10pm
Seriously, Rainey - it used to be very hard for a single woman to get a mortgage..... there were many issues about the past that may well have contributed to the current situation of many - including yourself.

I may disagree with the current 'super-socialist' approach to 'rectifying' the ills of the past as regards women in society by forcing them on us and into the easy well-paid jobs *- but there were some very genuine and real issues about.

* I've always maintained that equality is as equality does - and that you simply declare equal treatment from a specified day without all this silly fiddling with it to try to 'make up' for situations in the past over which the vast majority of those directly affected had NO control or input. Hence my opposition to AA/EEO, quotas, fiddling with education standards, extra funding etc - declare equality, treat everybody by the same values, and let them prosper or fall on their own merits. Same with Aboriginals and ethnics and all that... pushing White Men to the back of the bus and out of the local swimming pool will NOT resolve the issues.
melbgirl
1st May 2018
12:33pm
Yes Trebor, it was nigh on impossible to get a mortgage as a single woman with young kids; I did try. Unable to keep the house I moved from a regional area to the city where I was able to find work; spent over 25% of income just on childcare for many years - no rebates back then. After childcare and tax I had less money than a single mother's pension paid, but chose to work to give my kids a work ethic and good education. I thought I would be able to put aside for myself when they grew up, but had to retire early due to serious medical condition. Am still supporting the youngest at uni now.
I am not complaining about my situation, just tired of those saying renters did not try hard enough etc. I worked by butt off!
Also agree with your comments about equality, if only those in charge treated all equally we would get somewhere.
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
6:02pm
Seriously, Trebor, I know all about single women struggling to buy a home and raise children. And melbgirl, I had a disabled partner and child and a lot of serious ill-health myself, so I know about bad luck too. I sympathize with your situation, and yes, it is tough for some. Unfortunately, too many bludgers and spendthrifts are being supported. Years ago, widows were supported, but divorcees and single mothers had to go it alone. Maybe there was something to be said for being a little more selective about who we help with taxpayer funds. Frankly, I've always thought widows should get much more assistance, provided they didn't inherit substantial assets or get large insurance payouts. Nobody asks to be left without their partner, particularly with children.
melbgirl
1st May 2018
8:03pm
No inheritance or insurance payout for me, husband was minimum wage earner, no entitlements then. Bank manager refused to refinance home to me, advised me to remarry! I didn't sit at home on the pension as I could have, I worked hard to give my kids a roof, education etc, no money for holidays or extras.
The years of work means I have a small superannuation pension, which reduces my Centrelink payments, thats fair enough. The kids are grown up, I'm still single and in poor health. It's not practical for me to move away, my medical treatment, looking after my very elderly mother in nursing home, being close to my kids. My (wealthy) sister had guardianship over my mother for 13 years, in that time every single cent disappeared leaving my mother in serious arrears at the nursing home. I am now guardian and intend to do the right thing by my mother until the end. I live frugally and am not complaining, just get upset when people say I should have tried harder, saved more etc.
OnlyGenuineRainey
2nd May 2018
8:28am
You've had a tough time, melbgirl, and done well despite the challenges. You deserve admiration and generous support. The problem is that MOST renters are NOT in your situation. I know dozens who gambled, drank, holidayed, partied, and just didn't bother to try to pay off a mortgage. They are the ones making it hard for people like you. They may not have much to say, but they ARE the problem. And sadly they are the majority. If we could somehow sift out the genuinely needy from the wasters, we could solve the problems easily. I doubt anyone would resist a small tax to provide adequately for people like you and GregH - and it would only take a relatively small tax to provide for those who have experienced genuine hardship through no fault of their own. But the problem with needs-based welfare is that it drives everyone to evidence ''need''.
TREBOR
2nd May 2018
1:01pm
Yes - but what do we do with the wasters and (gasps) 'leaners'? Expose them on a hillside in the snow? Gulag them?

When you start down that road - where does it end? Anyone who is unemployed for two years is gulaged as a socially undesirable?
TREBOR
2nd May 2018
1:04pm
And never forget that the example handed down from the political class and their mates - of conspicuous consumption of the taxpayer's hoard - shows them more than clearly that there is a massive Age of Entitlement.... and why should they not partake of it?

If it's good enough for Tony Abbott to have all costs paid out of the treasury for ANY event where he is 'invited as the ex-PM' (wide open!!) -the thinking goes that why should not the peons thrown out of work by idiotic government policies get the same treatment?

If a retired politician is run around in a private car, why should the jobseeker have to pay fares?

That's how it works when a poor example is given from 'the top'.
OnlyGenuineRainey
3rd May 2018
9:22am
Trebor, my preferred solution has always been a universal pension paid to all aged, widowed, disabled, and sick. My preference would be to pay it at a flat rate adequate to sustain a modest standard of living, then pay a generous supplement to people who can demonstrate genuine hardship as a result of quantifiable circumstances - eg. being widowed with children and minimal or no assets or insurance; injured in a significant accident; orphaned and abused/deprived of opportunity; carer of a seriously ill or disabled person; etc. NO SUPPLEMENT for those who just didn't save, and NO RENT ASSISTANCE. That way, people who work hard and save would enjoy fair reward and thus there would be more incentives to do that, but nobody should fall through the cracks. Couple that with capping all wage and salary earnings as a multiple of the minimum wage, a fair minimum wage that is at least 20% higher than any benefit paid to cover the extra costs of holding a job (travel, clothing, packed lunches, etc) and a restructured taxation system that imposes an inescapable minimum tax on all corporations, trusts, etc. and the abolition of tax rorts (including changing the superannuation tax concession to 15% less than the individual's top marginal tax rate) and we would start to see some social health WITHOUT destroying incentive.

Introduced compulsory ''life skills'' courses in all high schools, including extensive budgeting and financial management instruction, and offer free courses in budgeting, financial management and investing for all adults, making budgeting training compulsory for anyone applying for any kind of special benefit or charity handout.
heemskerk99
30th Apr 2018
10:23pm
am I the only one who is getting enough of the bulldust this so called tremor,(labor mick), is putting up in these columns, one day he is a carer for his ex, tell me who would want to live with a creature like tremor in the first place, who thinks the sun shines out of his arse, next thing he is telling you he is on another european cruise, next he owns this large boat he lives on for six months a year or under his alias, labor mick, he goes skiing 3 months of the year, visits France for 3 months or goes to Italy for another 2 months, read the travel information on the Saturday life choices, stated he served in the militaire forces, forgot to tell you got thrown out after 4 days, next paragraph he worked for 100 hours + and calls himself a great performer and still works after being 60 years old, what a accomplishment, I used to do that in one week, now he is looking for an Europian retreat to live as long as no other people disturb him, what a loser, states he lives in a village yet not long ago stated he lived in newcastle nsw, call that a village?
I feel for those who are renting, I know your difficulties, however the comments of the likes of tremor are not helpful and indeed are doing more damage then good and will only attract more disparaging comments to the real issue at stake.
Rae
1st May 2018
9:07am
And after the rant about one contributor exactly what do you think the "real issue at stake" is and what should we be doing about it?

You continually criticise others but never offer a real opinion of your own.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
9:29am
I love it when you talk dirty, heemie - as usual you're wrong on every score.... no toddle off home and enjoy a nice warm cup of hemlock.

Your inability to handle English is showing... you can't read one thing I've said and make sense of it.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
9:37am
I'm not going to outline my personal details for you, heemie, no matter how much you try - and I'm not Mick - he lives in the Big Smoke and I live in the bush..... and I don't ski with my knees anyway.... learn to read and stop confusing yourself.

Make that two warm cups of hemlock....... now settle down.
TREBOR
2nd May 2018
1:05pm
And YES - you are the only one - take the dunce cap and sit in the corner....
VeryCaringBigBear
30th Apr 2018
10:42pm
Well we are in a property bubble with people owning houses and leaving them empty because tenants do too much damage and have too many rights. It is simply not worth renting them out so they stay empty. Those that do rent can charge what they like as there is thus a shortage of rental properties.

Just waiting to see how bad this can really get when Labor axes negative gearing and house prices increase even further as more self funded retirees buy more expensive houses. We ain't seen nothing yet folks. Watch this space.
Rae
1st May 2018
9:11am
Yes it's predictable. The current yields on rental property is less than 2% now. It's not worth the risk of damage and I can't understand those heavily in debt not selling up now. Trying to live on those rents that are only half an aged pension can't be much fun for the owner if retired. That's the other side of it.
Rae
1st May 2018
9:13am
And let's not forget the costs of owning property, as OGR reminded us, has to be subtracted from that rent of half an aged pension.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
9:34am
So it's the real deal to just buy up property and leave it lie fallow and then whine about your lack of income to support it?

How do these people pay these mortgages when they are not using their investment for income to cover it? Rob banks? Deal drugs?

If what you say is true BB - why do we have self-interest groups who blame the pensioners for the costs of housing and the inability of the young to get into the market? You've pointed out the guilty parties right there.

Sounds like you are demonstrating that the property investment racket is in downfall, especially when the return is a mere 2%, as Rae says.

When I did economics, the prof had some shares in Ansett - he said that if it only returned 4%, as it did at that time, it was not worth his time.

So if 2% is the norm, accompanied by the potential for loss through damage etc - why are people still investing in this market?
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
11:00am
Trebor, I suspect these people bought houses in better times expecting a decent return to fund their retirement. Now, they have a choice of accepting the miserable returns or selling out and living on the proceeds until the cash runs out, then resorting to a pension. Life isn't a bowl of cherries for SFRs either, you know. It's not just pensioners getting a bad deal. And sure, if you have assets, you are better off than those who have none, but it's not an appealing prospect to have to use those assets to live on until you can qualify for a pension, when you probably went without a great deal to acquire those assets hoping they would provide you with a better lifestyle. I get very tired of the ''entitlement'' attitude that suggests anyone with assets should just hand them over so pensioners can be better off.
TREBOR
1st May 2018
11:55am
Yes - it's becoming a hard run all round... the costs of owning are higher and higher, especially maintenance, and so is the cost of renting.

I think the idea of handing over etc comes from a small side of the discussion - there are many unfair situations in life, and certainly the lower end of the SFRs, from what I read, are copping one or more of those.

Still - we shouldn't fight among ourselves - the enemy is over there...
TREBOR
1st May 2018
12:15pm
Don't forget that the push was on only in the last year for people to expend all their assets before getting a pension.

What we need is a properly run retirement packaging scheme, and having it safe so that people cannot fall through the cracks as it appears some smaller SFRs are doing, paying for healthcare, no PPS, and such, and having perhaps only a little more than a pensioner single or couple (as the case may be).

NOBODY should fall below a certain level and still have to pay for healthcare at top rate etc.... that's simply not fair... but the blame lies with government and its agencies - not with other retirees.
Kathleen
1st May 2018
1:23pm
Good point, Trebor! Other retirees should not be the whipping boy for the government. Support each other as we are not so different, basically in the same boat, just trying to enjoy our remaining years!
OnlyGenuineRainey
1st May 2018
4:47pm
Not in the same boat at all, Kathleen. We all worked and paid tax, but those who made the choice to spend freely are supported by the taxpayer and those who made the choice to save to hopefully enjoy life a little better in their later years are being stripped of all they worked for, and sadly pensioners are touting the notion that those who saved are 'lucky' and SHOULD be deprived.
Nan Norma
1st May 2018
6:24pm
Trebor, Those people that buy a house and don't live in it, only pay the interest. They wait for the house to go up in value then sell at a nice little profit.
OnlyGenuineRainey
2nd May 2018
8:55am
Nan Norma, in today's environment, I doubt anyone would make money with that strategy. Add up interest, rates, water, insurance and then factor in predictions that the property bubble has burst, and there would really be no sense in that strategy. However, I sympathize with landlords trying to earn income by renting out houses because so many tenants are unreasonable and destructive and the laws are very unfavourable to landlords. If they get a savvy tenant who knows their way around the legal system, they can be thoroughly done over and have no real recourse. I know the reverse is true sometimes. There are landlords who are unconscionable and tenants who don't know how to enforce their rights, but I sure wouldn't want to be a landlord.
TREBOR
2nd May 2018
1:09pm
Rainey - it's not pensioners who are touting that idea - it is your own government that is short-changing you when you are at the lower and harder end of the SFR chain.

The suggestion that pensioners want that is absurd - I doubt it even crosses their minds, and the whole idea was just another red herring thrown up by those intent on dividing the retiree community against itself, so they can swallow it piecemeal.

When you go into the Central Highlands, do NOT, under any circumstances, divide your command...
Radish
2nd May 2018
4:28pm
"IF" the idea (being bandied around) of a "vacant residential property tax " gets legs ...i.e. people who buy homes as investment and leave vacant for years hoping they will make a big profit on the sale ...watch the homes for sale adverts rise.

Hopefully it will bring down the cost of homes.
Joy Anne
1st May 2018
8:49am
I am a single pensioner and I pay $600 a fortnight in rent. I had to move from Ipswich area to try and get closer to my daughter and new granddaughter now nearly 4 months old. I had to stay in a self contained granny flat and store my belongings until I found a place. Tried for nearly 2 months and nothing on the Sunshine Coast and Agents don't like renting to pensioners. That is the impression I got from some agents. I had to go to Gympie to get an affordable place where the agent was excellent here. Just moved in 27/4/18.
melbgirl
1st May 2018
1:08pm
40% of income for rent, having recently downsized to an apartment close to shops and public transport. Until recently was paying 58% after my older kids moved out of family house; was hard to find a place, agents prefer double income couples to older singles; despite having excellent references.
MD
1st May 2018
6:14pm
"Well - I suppose everyone could have been on a lifetime income guarantee..."

Supposition, pure and simple ! A pipe dream and furthermore a totally erroneous/unfounded comment. And yes, contrary to your false findings we can expect that some people will/do/have fall(en) on hard times and therefore the thrust of your comment is neither here nor there, ergo, you haven't solved any issues, anyway as (according to your logic they) "wouldn't work" it does not follow that anyone needs "become a good socialist".

..."ensure that people are treated reasonably" - hells bells man, are you suggesting that folk nowadays are NOT ? Maybe you need to define and qualify your take on what is considered reasonable. Currently in our lucky society - whingers, moaners and the self proclaimed oppressed aside - dare I suggest the degree of 'basic comfort' adequate to most (obviously not all) social recipients basic needs - as opposed to their demands/expectations.

I made no suggestion whatsoever concerning my Grandmother yet you have taken the liberty of conjecturing pure clap trap based on emotional hyperbole. Get a grip man, get your head outa the sand, address the issues on their merit and try to overcome the urge to have something to say about everything to everyone... you may pick up a few tips.

I wish you well in your future endeavours.
TREBOR
2nd May 2018
1:16pm
Well - my good MD - the suggestion that perhaps a lifetime income guarantee could replace the current helter-skelter approach - was clearly placed there to point out the absurdity of some of the suggestions that people should be treateddifferent and as 'losers' etc when they are pensioners - as if they've never worked or had a hard run etc.

You are lost in political parody, aren't you?

What we are hearing here, my man, are countless suggestions that people SHOULD be treated differently as a matter of policy - on the base and false assumption that those on pension only are wasters etc, and thus are worthy of being dictated to over where they can live etc. Just serfs and numbers to be pushed around the chess board by their 'betters'.

Are you suggesting tat because rents are so high, those who have not had the good fortune to retire with their own home etc, should be simply cast aside? THAT is what you are saying, Herr Oberstumbannfuhrer.

If your grandmother worked like a slave sixteen hours a day in a paid job - well and good - but the concept - which clearly evades you - is that for countless reasons, including social conditions pertaining at the time - many such would NOT have worked sixteen hours a day in a paid job, and you therefore have no right to differentiate between one and another. Not only that, but you have no idea what the individual circumstances were and are.

The issue here is whether or not people can afford ONE OF THOSE BASICS - a roof over their head.... now get with it.
heemskerk99
1st May 2018
7:39pm
oh my god, tremor(labor mick) now professes to have done economics, the professor who attempted to teach him was absolute right, when he/she stated that that was a waste of his/her time, political remarks will do nothing to rectify the problem at hand, only the state government, they are the one in charge, can rectify the public housing situation, nothing to do with the so-called rich members of our community. as for rae, the less said the better, just read his comments, any wonder owners reject certain tennants after seeing the damage done to their properties!
TREBOR
2nd May 2018
1:19pm
..and refugee issues, and terrorism/counter-terrorism, and a few other things....

And at least I can use capital letters in my comments...

You would do well to look at the issues fully - anytime there is a suggestion of curtailing negative gearing, for example, the cry goes up in government circles that it would kill the market for renters by causing a massive cost rise.

Now tell me again that government is the only one involved....

You would do well to refrain from personal comments, dopey, and get some valid comments on the board.
Marian
2nd May 2018
12:08am
The is not any more rude system of Governments as is in Australia the Australian pensioners the is all the time abuse molest discrimination lie by the Governments lie by the rotten corrupt Senate the is crime against International law Human Rights is crime against U.N. Conventions rights persons whith Disability corrupt criminals on Parliaments bully lie whith the fake media is gang ministers who abuse all the time human dignity ass the M.Keenan
MD
2nd May 2018
8:22am
Are you certain about your claims Marian ? Perhaps you could suggest a link (or two) to verify.
Maybe some rudimentary research into the workings of, say China, or some Middle Eastern countries (to name but two) would lend some insight that might temper your opinion.
Old Geezer
2nd May 2018
12:14pm
I sold all my rental properties over the last couple of years simply because we have a property bubble and the return on their value was less than if I left the money in the bank. How many other have done the same thing?
TREBOR
2nd May 2018
1:21pm
Probably a few.... those who can read the straws in the wind....
MD
2nd May 2018
8:10pm
..."was clearly placed there to point out the absurdity of some of the suggestions that people should be treated different and as 'losers' etc when they are pensioners."
"absurdity" - your word, your say so, you so obviously expect to carry the discussion by the sheer volume of absurd comment.

..."people should be treated different and as 'losers' etc when they are pensioners"... 'losers' - your word, your say so, you so obviously expect to carry the day with your innate knowledge - so aptly applied by none other than you.

'What we are hearing here", and sorry to disappoint, I am not "(your man)" may well be none other than voices in your head.
"false assumptions" - yours again no doubt.

"Are you suggesting tat(sic) because rents are so high"...
No, I did/am not suggesting anything of the sort and as you posed the question then why immediately follow it with YOUR answer.
For the record, I resigned my commission decades ago and never served in the German military.

Your fixation with "grandmother" is obviously well entrenched in your psyche and as per my earlier response - pure conjecture and clap trap.

(That I) "have no idea" strikes me as more than a tad ipso facto coming from you.

Finally - "ONE OF THOSE BASICS" - certainly expresses your style and in all probability your ideal sign off... now with that, please excused me !
heemskerk99
2nd May 2018
4:52pm
sorry tremor(labor mick) you forgot to mention you also was the prime minister or even better the emperor, of which country one may ask, dreamland of course, happy dreams your highnots
TREBOR
2nd May 2018
6:32pm
Wake up, heemie - you're going nowhere with any of this and are running risks.

Continued personal attacks will bring you to the notice of the forum owners.
heemskerk99
2nd May 2018
7:21pm
love it tremor, may also find your dubble out, labor mick.

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5:01pm
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OnlyGenuineRainey
6th May 2018
2:27pm
End rent assistance altogether and apply government funds to reduce council rates and development costs so more affordable housing becomes available. Develop more public housing for those in genuine need - disabled, widowed, etc. - and stop funding rent assistance for people who just didn't bother to plan for their accommodation in retirement. Rent assistance is creating an unfair imbalance, discriminating against home owners. Also abolish the difference in the assets test for home owners and non-home-owners. There should NOT be a penalty for struggling for decades to pay off a home so that you are less dependant on the public purse in retirement.


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