Anthony Albanese lends his voice to euthanasia debate

The push for legalising voluntary euthanasia gains another supporter.

Man sits by his dying wife considering legal euthanasia

The push for legalising voluntary euthanasia gained a major supportor yesterday, with Labor’s Anthony Albanese adding his voice to the discussion.

Speaking to Sky News, the Labor frontbencher said he first made his support known during a parliamentary debate, some 20 years ago, into a bill that sought to ban the ACT and Northern Territory from legalising voluntary euthanasia.

He believes that when someone is on the brink of death and they have been prepared to make the decision to end their life, then the law should “respect their personal wishes”.

While noting that he was “ a supporter of voluntary euthanasia”, Mr Albanese is clear that a change to the law must be the subject of a conscience vote and safeguards would need to be put in place to protect the interests of those dying.

Mr Albanese isn't the only high-profile individual to speak out in support of the issue. Media broadcaster and producer, Andrew Denton, is a powerful advocate for voluntary euthanasia, having watched his once strong, proud father die an agonising death. Denton will today speak at the National Press Club on the subject of assisted dying.

Late last year, Mr Denton gave a speech at the Wheeler Centre in which he touched on the issues of assisted dying already happening in Australia, although the extent is unknown. “Whether it’s being done well, or for the right reasons, or with the consent of patients – as they do overseas – because the absence of a law here means we have no guidelines, no reporting mechanisms and no system of review.

“All we have is doctors doing what they believe is best, depending on their moral view of the universe,” said Denton.

And it appears the sentiment is gaining support among other parliamentary parties. Earlier this year, a federal cross-party parliamentary working group signalled its intention to expedite a bill that would overturn the ban on legalising euthanasia, legislated by then Prime Minister John Howard. Co-sponsored by Labor senator Katy Gallagher and Greens leader, Richard Di Natale, the bill was introduced in March but has since lapsed due to parliament being suspended for the Federal Election.

Read more at The Guardian
Read more at Aww.com.au

Opinion: Time to treat us like adults

‘Life is for the living’ – never a truer word was said and with most Australians knowing exactly how they feel about dying, it’s time for the powers that be to finally take notice of their wishes.

Voluntary euthanasia is an emotive issue, with as many people willing to speak out against as there are in favour. But let us not forget that death is a very personal issue, and one for which, given the chance, we should have the final say.

The legalising of voluntary euthanasia should not be a decision taken lightly, but rather than focusing on whether it should happen, the discussion should be shifted to the when and how. It really doesn't matter whether you are for or against, you legally should have the right to make the decision either way.

In a survey run by YourLifeChoices last November, 92 per cent of the 3290 respondents had thought about their own death and 75 per cent of those were not afraid of dying.

When faced with the possibility of ending their days as a result of a tragic incident or prolonged illness, many were clear about what they wanted. In fact, 67 per cent responded that they knew exactly how they wanted to end their days, yet only 40 per cent have recorded such wishes.

The overwhelming response was that people don't want to end their days on life support, with a significantly reduced quality of life or in constant, unbearable pain. Of course, it’s fine to hold that view when you know there is no legal way you can actually act on your wishes. Perhaps if voluntary euthanasia were a legal option, more would be inclined to legally state their preference on how they wish to die.

Dying with dignity is the last gift we can give someone, so surely it’s time to end the debate and start on the legal framework?

What do you think? Should voluntary euthanasia, if properly legislated, be legalised? Would legalising it make you change your point of view? Have you recorded your wishes regarding your death?

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    COMMENTS

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    kev888
    10th Aug 2016
    10:16am
    This is about a persons choice without interference from others no matter what agenda they may have. For the religious, GOD gave us the right of free choice and forgiveness, I support euthanasia, and freedom of choice
    Sen.Cit.90
    10th Aug 2016
    10:18am
    Yes, I've completed an 'Advanced Health Directive'. A Doctor will go over it with you to explain terms you do not comprehend before he/she signs it.
    Anonymous
    10th Aug 2016
    11:29am
    And that only prevents treatment to PROLONG life. It does NOT permit action to end life when you are in agony and there is nothing left to look forward to.

    My mother had a very detailed and carefully crafted Advanced Health Directive, and it proved utterly useless in protecting her from a painful, slow, dreadful death.
    poorwomanme
    10th Aug 2016
    10:22am
    Like all freedoms we strive for as human beings the church continues to try and dictate how we are born, how we live and how we can die.
    Their evilness knows no bounds and have no place in Australian society.
    KSS
    10th Aug 2016
    1:21pm
    Actually its not the church that stands in the way, its the law that tries medical staff and others for murder that is the problem.
    Not Amused
    10th Aug 2016
    10:52am
    The only directives we are permitted is to say we don't want to be kept alive on machines or withdraw all medications. Other than that, the only thing they allow is to be deprived of food and drink while they pump morphine into a sick body, which can take a week to kill someone. It's an horrific way to see someone die but goodness knows what the patient silently endures because they usually can't say. Medical science has improved every aspect of life including birthing which they can make pain-free, if requested. Yet at the other end of life, oh well, let them suffer.
    moke
    10th Aug 2016
    4:01pm
    Not Amused
    Medical Science has not really improved every aspect of life, for most medications have side effects that the patient is not generally made aware of, but they have made Trillions of dollars. Having had heart problems and given medication that made me feel quite unwell I checked out side effects on the internet and found an article by a doctor that gave a list of side effects that could have made the problems worse. I may be considered a bit thick but I like to check out any Chinese etc things that have been used for 1000s of years and get a second opinion
    Jezemeg8
    10th Aug 2016
    10:55am
    I still have issues that "dying with dignity" means one must euthanize oneself. I've been at the bedside of many who have passed on peacefully without taking the step of ending their lives and have always been impressed by their dignity.
    Sure, many have spent their last days being cared for by others (as no doubt I will too), but there is nothing undignified about that. Yes, I am a believer in Jesus Christ, BUT, I also respect the viewpoints of others and don't wish to impose mine on them, neither do I want their beliefs and values imposed on me.
    As I've related several times, nearly 20 years ago now 6 doctors agreed that I had only 6 months to live, and most of those would be spent in advanced care facilities being unable to move more than my eyes. Well, even though disability continues to encroach on my body and I must use a mobility scooter to do my everyday tasks like shopping etc, I still live independently (well as independently as one can with two furry companions). I'm glad that my initial reaction of fear of future, didn't lead to me ending my life, I would have missed out on knowing my grandchildren and on meeting many people during our nightly forays out among the homeless and street folk.
    So, I suggest that people give themselves an opportunity to sort out whether the doctor's diagnosis is entirely correct. On more than one occasion, my story has caused someone to delay their decision to end their lives and on two instances their disease went into total remission.

    10th Aug 2016
    10:59am
    Albanese is one of the VERY few politicians who has the guts to speak on anything, but that voice of his is almost as annoying as that of the shiela from RACQ who appears on TV. Finger nails on a blackboard make a more pleasant sound.
    Anonymous
    10th Aug 2016
    11:33am
    Repeated surveys evidence that the majority AGREE with Albanese. It is a breach of democratic process and an insult to the citizens of this country for the government to continue to ignore the wishes of the majority and impose their personal views in preference to those of the people they are paid to serve.
    HarrysOpinion
    10th Aug 2016
    11:41am
    Ditto, Rainey.
    Anonymous
    10th Aug 2016
    11:54am
    Yes, of course it is, but this is not the ONLY the majority in particular circumstances which is continually ignored by the government - like retirees, people who need life saving drugs not on the PBS, and isolated cases of hardship the bloody government sods turn a blind eye to because it just means they have to DO SOMETHING for a change! This government doesn't, give a rat's arse about anyone but themselves and this has been proved time and time again since they have been in office. Not worth their salt!
    Anonymous
    10th Aug 2016
    9:18pm
    Gee Fast Eddie, I think you are being a bit unfair. Albanese has got to where he has because of his abilities. He is articulate, expresses an opinion with clear, easy to understand words and can rip an opposition member to pieces when they deserve it. Sure, his upbringing didn't include elocution lessons but compare him with the king of waffle, Turnbull who has lovely diction and although articulate, has difficulty expressing an opinion in a way that the average person can understand.
    Anonymous
    11th Aug 2016
    1:52pm
    Turnbull could NEVER express an opinion in a way the average person can understand because he has no comprehension whatever of what life is like for anyone but the super-rich super-privileged. Goodness, at one point he claimed a disadvantaged background - someone who went to the most elite private school in the nation and inherited millions before he was 25!

    He lives in la la land, and his policies reflect that.
    Paddles
    11th Aug 2016
    10:53pm
    Old Man and Rainey

    Must everything in this forum descend into party politics?????

    I think that this (and many other things) are above that!
    mogo51
    10th Aug 2016
    11:27am
    My mother is 94 and has advanced Dementia, Scitsophrenia?, dual incontinence etc. She now has cataract in one eye, glucoma? etc. She has been in a nursing home for nearly 35 years. No Quality of life and there is nothing we can do to make a sensible decision on her behalf. She is now faced with whatever time she has left blind!
    Life for life sake, is not life.
    Jess M
    10th Aug 2016
    2:25pm
    I am so sorry for your mother and you and your family.
    My brother was diagnosed with early onset dementia at the age of 58 he is now 70. He hasn't spoken for years. Doesn't recognise anyone. Gets lifted in and out of bed with a hoist. Sits slumped in a chair all day. Spoon fed and has his nappy changed three times a day.
    His wife and two sons come out and cry after every visit.
    If one treated an animal like that one would be rightfully arrested. Yet we can treat humans like that. Why won't politicians listen?

    10th Aug 2016
    11:28am
    My mother died a slow and agonizing death. Her greatest fear through her later years was losing her dignity, and that fear was realized. It nearly killed me to stand by helplessly and watch her suffer that way. What a vile, cruel world we live in when we will not allow a terminally ill woman, in her 90s, a dignified death - when we will not end her pain and suffering, despite there being nothing left to live for, no purpose to preserving her life. She expressed her wishes very clearly, long before the end was near. Why would anyone want to forbid a doctor to show respect and care and honour her last wish?

    When there is no quality of life, those who have confirmed their wish for it to end should be obliged.

    We are kinder to animals than to our own kind!
    WiserNow
    10th Aug 2016
    11:37am
    If anyone has experienced the difference between watching a loved parent die a long and drawn out death from dementia, refusing food for weeks until weighing a mere 31kg, seeing a face permanently contorted by what appeared to be pain despite the pain killers, having them die alone at 3am as exhausted family had left for some sleep... and compares it with the gentle and peaceful departure surrounded by loved ones that my dog experienced, how can we not accord humans the same dignity if they choose? My mother always said she wanted a quick death so resources would not be wasted keeping her alive and could be directed towards treating children in less fortunate countries to enable them to have a better life. Instead she spent 6 years in a nursing home, distressed, confused, and withering away. Yes, I'm for euthanasia, and only hope compassion prevails before my time comes.
    Not Amused
    10th Aug 2016
    12:11pm
    Palliative care doctors say the only way to ensure a patient is pain-free is to administer a nembutal/propofol combination. (Just not too much of either!) That means the patient lingers on for a while, minus sustaining medications/food/water all the while (hopefully) anaesthetised. I say hopefully because no-one can get inside another person's body to know that how they are being treated as a result of on-high decisions, is a comfort and not a terrible experience. Euthanasia under dire circumstances must be everyone's choice.
    Disco3
    10th Aug 2016
    11:38am
    Just a thought; having the right to die in certain circumstances necessitates the existence of someone who is required to take that life - or assist the end of life process. Should that be a health professional or could it be a relative?
    HarrysOpinion
    10th Aug 2016
    11:43am
    Certified health professional. Keep the family out for obvious selfish, greedy and malicious intentions.
    ex PS
    11th Aug 2016
    9:56am
    I don't see finding someone to administer final relief as a problem, in the days of capital punishment there was no shortage of people willing to end life. In this case the person providing the service would know that they were performing an act of kindness. Alternatively, under the right circumstances I feel that I could release someone I cared for.
    I say this with the best intentions but saying you can do something like this and doing it are two different things, the only way to know for sure is to go through it.
    Remember, this comment is about administering relief not making the decision to end a life. This decision should only be made by the individual concerned.
    Gra
    10th Aug 2016
    11:42am
    It is wrong on so many levels that if we let an animal suffer we are looking at doing time in gaol, BUT, if we try to end a human's suffering we are most certainly going to gaol. Where is the sense in that? If a person is terminally ill and at that stage even if a cure for their illness was found tomorrow, they are beyond help, why shouldn't they be allowed to decide they have suffered enough or if they are incapable of making such a decision, why can't the next of kin make it for them?
    ex PS
    11th Aug 2016
    9:58am
    Simply because there are people out there who would decide to kill a relative in order to enrich themselves. Just look at the amount of people who have used power of attorney to steal from vulnerable people.
    Phil1943
    10th Aug 2016
    11:50am
    I don't want to end my life in a nursing home, unaware of my surroundings and having no quality of life while I finish up my time on earth. It should be possible to dictate the terms of our own death and have our wishes be legally binding. I've seen friends and relatives kept alive while I'm absolutely certain they would have preferred to be allowed to just gently go to sleep and not wake up. There comes a time for all of us and since it's our lives we're talking about, we should be able to say how they'll end.
    Jess M
    10th Aug 2016
    11:56am
    It's all about choice. At this time there is no choice. People who want to suffer to the end can do that now and will still be able to do that if we get legislation for assisted dying.
    Everyone should have the right to die when, where and with whom them choose.
    Legislation will take nothing away from people who choose not to use it.
    Old Geezer
    10th Aug 2016
    12:55pm
    It's my life and I alone should be able to choose to die with dignity. Palliative care is not for me as I don't want to linger on in a state between life and death for a week or more. I have no desire to be in a nursing home either. I don't want to play bingo in God's waiting room waiting for my number to be called.

    My mother was in a nursing home and would ring every week asking for her life support to be turned off (she wasn't even connected to it). I had to tell her that they weren't ready for her yet and she just had to wait for her number to be called. A couple of days before she died she rang me and said her number was on it's way.

    A friend recently died of cancer and lingered in palliative care for over a week. I saw them a couple of times and it saddened me that we let people endure such a slow death.
    ex PS
    11th Aug 2016
    10:01am
    Why do we have such a double standard, let an animal suffer unnecessarily and face fines or gaol time, but we allow humans to suffer for months and sometimes years so that Doctors can experiment on them and care facilities can make money.
    Crazy Horse
    10th Aug 2016
    12:56pm
    I have recently benn forced to endure yet again a close relative being forced to die a slow painful death in deep distress.

    I have also held my aging dog in my arms whilst she was sent quickly and peacefully to the bridge. I would have been prosecuted if I had put her through what my grandmother and father were forced to endure.

    I know which path I want when my time comes. My life, My choice.
    Young Simmo
    10th Aug 2016
    1:16pm
    I don't need anybody to give me the right to die as I have the equipment to do it. Yep, a packet of sleeping tablets, a packet of 40 mg Opioids and a lawn mower. I can use all 3 or just one, but the mower and Opioids will probably be my choice.
    When my Dr started talking about stopping my opioids, I said to him and he listened. I am 76 and probably only have 10 minutes to 10 years left, and I just want comfort with an enjoyable life. It worked.
    Not Amused
    10th Aug 2016
    6:45pm
    What's with the lawn mower?
    Young Simmo
    10th Aug 2016
    7:36pm
    A lawn mower produces Carbon Monoxide gas and you go to sleep peacefully. 1,000s of people used to use there cars, but the gas control exhaust systems stopped that.
    ex PS
    11th Aug 2016
    10:06am
    I am planning a trip to the good old USA when the time comes, a 38 special one bullet and a pair of handcuffs and instant relief.
    Why the handcuffs? I will handcuff the gun to myself so that if someone finds it before the authorities find me it can do no further harm. At least it will be one gun that served a good purpose.
    Young Simmo
    11th Aug 2016
    11:46am
    Thanks for the ex PS, I'll put that down as option No (4)
    KSS
    10th Aug 2016
    1:26pm
    While we are putting together the plebiscite for same sex marriage, why not add this issue to form? That way everyone including politicians gets a vote (no need for a conscience vote) and yes/no wins.

    It would be relatively easy to then put parameters round a 'yes' vote in order to prevent murder by greedy families. However, it is often families themselves who do NOT carry out the wishes of the person - consider the situation where transplant donors are overruled by family members - even when the donor has made their wishes known in writing.
    ex PS
    11th Aug 2016
    10:07am
    YES, YES, YES, YES!!!!!!
    Foxy
    10th Aug 2016
    1:51pm
    KSS - yes - BOTH of these issues "same sex marriage" and "euthanasia" - should have been included into this latest Census Form! Would have saved MILLIONS OF DOLLARS!!
    Too easy perhaps for Politicians to think that far ahead? What a joke!!
    terrib
    10th Aug 2016
    2:49pm
    Fill out your advanced health directive, let your family & doctor know & join Exit & learn the correct way to exit life if that is what you wish. No point waiting for the pollies to get their act together it won't happen in our lifetime.
    I have my family on my side, my paperwork done but the final choice will be up to me & me alone. Nobody will tell me I cannot choose to exit when I have suffered enough, only I will decide that. My life my death my way.
    Anonymous
    11th Aug 2016
    1:48pm
    Wrong terrib! Sorry. Advanced health care directive ONLY stops you being kept alive artificially. It DOES NOT allow you to die with dignity. It's useless in most circumstances. My mother had one - very carefully crafted by a lawyer and detailed. It was NO help at all to prevent her suffering for months.
    Pamiea
    10th Aug 2016
    3:39pm
    I 100% support the decision to end ones own life or the life of a loved one if there is no chance of them recovering or they are in pain. Some siblings may be after ones parents money so this needs to be considered seriously. (I have two marauding siblings who tried to get my mothers money after the sale of her house. Both of them are millionaires and my mum is still alive. I had to have my brother's enduring power of attorney removed via the legal system so he couldnt do this as I knew this was thieving and I didnt want to be any part of stolen funds).
    SKRAPI
    10th Aug 2016
    3:45pm
    Euthanasia or no should be each individual's choice .Many older people feel this way as do some terminally ill people . i wouldn't have an advance directive because U don't get fluids or anything for your illness . U may as well die in the dessert . My husband had an advance directive . And morphine suppresses the lungs . I have my own arrangemnts .
    fish head
    10th Aug 2016
    4:05pm
    YES
    MD
    10th Aug 2016
    5:09pm
    Legalizing will neither change my thinking or point of view.
    I also think a good many poor souls will yet suffer whilst we await a political determination.
    Obviously an individuals wishes should be honoured, given they are fully cognizant at the time of 'signing up'. This should only be done with the prior agreement of ALL family members & to ensure wishes will be honoured, then individuals need appoint a Power of Attorney - also with family knowledge/agreement.
    In the event of severe life support dependence or loss of faculties the initial decision will probably be suggested by the attendant Doctor, thereafter the appointee as designated.
    Surprisingly, of those that currently 'sign -up' for Nitschkes' (self administered) 'home kit' is the number of those that do not follow through. It is a glib comment for anyone to claim "no nursing home for me" or "I don't want to suffer like - '. No-one, but no-one knows the exact time of their pending demise so for those wishing to elect how & when, then the right time to address the issue is the very instant we first contemplate it. To wait, simply because we THINK we're a long way shy of the inevitable is a sure-fire shot at a vain attempt to beat the terrible reaper.
    I'd like to say that I'll communicate personal experience from the never never but fear the message may be blowin in the wind.
    ex PS
    12th Aug 2016
    5:42pm
    I think it has been the case that many people who have been given the means to end their life have not chosen to use it. They just wanted the reassurance that they could find relief if they needed it.
    like most human experiences, certainty is the main cause of distress.
    Foxy
    10th Aug 2016
    5:36pm
    ...good luck with that one "terrib" - I wish you well! :-)
    Pamiea
    10th Aug 2016
    5:41pm
    Being in a nursing home is not the end of the world! Sure if you are suffering it wouldnt be fun but my mum who is 94 does get enjoyment from some of the activities, the cheerful staff and the care she receives is great. She may not be alive now if it wasnt for these wonderful caring people. One of her grandchildren lived with her and his girlfriend. Elder abuse was clearly evident.
    Jess M
    10th Aug 2016
    6:22pm
    I am sure a nursing home is not the end of the world for some. My father who I loved dearly had little education was simple in his pleasures didn't seem to mind it too much. However my brother, his son had a good education went to the top of his profession Diagnosed with early onset dementia at age 58 now in a nursing home
    aged 70. He is different, he had autonomy now sits slumped in a chair all day. Had a year or more frustration and crying. Given up now sits slumped in his chair and hasn't spoken for years. I defy anyone to call that living.
    Anonymous
    11th Aug 2016
    1:50pm
    It was the end of the world for my mother, and I'll do myself in before I'll endure what she suffered in a nursing home.
    Pamiea
    10th Aug 2016
    5:42pm
    And have to add both mums grandson and girlfriend were allergic to work and didnt!!
    Cuphandle
    10th Aug 2016
    8:27pm
    Quite obviously the majority of people on this website believe strongly in the principle of Voluntary Euthanasia!

    Why is it that if a person makes the decision to end his/her own life he/she is condemned by Society and the Church?

    We are a very sick society that will allow our own flesh and blood to die a slow and painful death, knowing that the sufferer is at the end of life`s journey, but must be kept alive for whatever religious or societal reasons, because "it has always been that way!"

    I have made my decision that as long as I am capable,and when I decide that my quality of life has degenerated to a low enough level, I will terminate myself in a clean manner, NOT like some poor bastards have no option to do, but blow their head off with a double barreled shotgun, or hang themselves in the garage, but a simple pass-away event during sleep, leaving no blame against anyone!

    I believe that everyone reaching the age of 65 years ( should they so desire) be able to acquire by Prescription ( authorized by their Medical Practitioner )a lethal dose Nembutal capsule, and be held responsible for its location and safe-keeping, until used by the patient or handed in /destroyed legally after death of the patient, if NOT utilized!

    The world is overpopulated, and each and every individual suffers varying amounts of pain and suffering during a lifetime, thus it is NOT against Natures laws to put an end to unnecessary suffering, as is done with one`s loved pet dog or cat or whatever animal is loved as part of one`s family!

    GO Voluntary Euthanasia!
    Jennie
    10th Aug 2016
    11:25pm
    You can join Exit International once aged 50...
    Young Simmo
    10th Aug 2016
    11:31pm
    Jennie, what is the cost per year ?
    ex PS
    11th Aug 2016
    10:14am
    Cuphandle, I think that you are right but I would amend your original thought about the church and society. I would word it as condemned by church society. I believe that the churches resistance to a follower committing suicide or taking their own life stems from the fact that all Christians used to be compelled to donate regularly to the church in order to prove how devout they were, if you are dead you can't make a donation.
    Crimmo
    10th Aug 2016
    8:34pm
    While voluntary euthanasia should theoretically be allowed on compassionate grounds, it should NEVER be legalised. If it were to be legalised, we would have yet another form of elder abuse to deal with. Where money is concerned you cannot trust anyone. Apart from the greedy ME generation, you cannot trust doctors or lawyers. There will always be doctors and lawyers who will support greedy children to kill off the elderly parent for monetary reward.
    devuman
    11th Aug 2016
    4:04am
    Unfortunately, this is the 'gut-feel' response of those who haven't explored the subject more closely and have thus not understood the safeguards which can be in place to prevent this happening.

    May I suggest that folk who have this, and other opposing views (such as the 'slippery slope', and the "only God can choose"arguments, etc.) listen to Andrew Denton's talk to the Press Club yesterday which is still on iView in which such concerns are addressed.
    ex PS
    11th Aug 2016
    10:19am
    Crimmo, your concerns are relevant, but if you study the responses here you will find an overwhelming view that the final decision is to be made by an individual with no hint of coercion from other sources. This should allay your fears. I feel that if you have not indicated clearly what your wishes are you should not be euthanized.
    Anonymous
    11th Aug 2016
    1:56pm
    Correct, devuman. Crimmo, it's very simple really. People make Advanced Health Directives all the time that say ''in XX circumstances, I don't want artificial methods used to prolong my life''. These are made with the aid of a doctor and lawyer and with careful precautions to ensure the person making the Directive is of sound mind, understands what they are directing fully, and has not been unduly influenced.

    All that is needed is for this document to be able to be extended to say ''in YYY circumstances, I want a doctor to end my life as quickly and compassionately as possible''. Same precautions. Same protections. There would be virtually NO chance for greedy children to exert influence inappropriately.
    Snowflake
    10th Aug 2016
    9:54pm
    I for one would not let a relative of mine suffer in such an appalling way as described in these posts. I really have no regard whatsoever for religious or political reasons for not helping these poor people. I would do the right thing and to hell with the consequences. And under no circumstances, as a jury member, would I find anyone guilty of a crime if I was satisfied they had acted in good faith and an act of mercy was warranted. And no, I am not acting like god, I would simply let the facts speak for themselves. Wake up you halfwit politicians and do some good for once.
    4b2
    11th Aug 2016
    8:27am
    We have a personal choice now to end our own lives, we should never involve others to help us make that decision or take that action on our behalf.
    Jess M
    11th Aug 2016
    8:36am
    Not a safe, sure way.
    Some people hang themselves, shoot themselves. Someone has to find them in that state. Surely better to take a prescribed medication and go to sleep.
    ex PS
    11th Aug 2016
    10:21am
    4b2, true, but why not give individuals the means of doing so in a humane efficient way?
    Jess M
    11th Aug 2016
    11:10am
    I agree, if capable of taking the medicine oneself that is good. However, there are many people who cannot take the medicine themselves. As some diseases progress swallowing is difficult so will need an injection. Other people with advanced multiple sclerosis cannot take it themselves so there should be options for those people.
    4b2
    11th Aug 2016
    2:23pm
    It appears most of the respondents want to act like Greyhound Trainers. When we or our loved ones (including the children or infants) are suffering a slow and painful illness lets euthanize them.
    Jess M
    11th Aug 2016
    2:37pm
    No, Greyhound trainers were euthanising dogs that were perfectly healthy but couldn't run fast enough. We are talking about people who are DYING and don't want the final stages. We are only asking for a choice but insist on plenty of safeguards.
    My husband suffered for 5 years with terminal cancer. A brave and wonderful man whose last days were horrendous.
    ex PS
    11th Aug 2016
    9:47am
    If an individual who is sound of mind and is proven to be acting of their own free will, with no coercion or influence from a second or third party they should be allowed to make their own decision.
    I would take it one step further and say that terminal illness should not be the only reason that voluntary euthanasia should be allowed. As long as the individual is of sound mind and can express their wishes in a concise and rational manner they should be allowed to terminate their lives with dignity.
    If I have done everything that I have ever wanted to and I feel that my life is not contributing to society why can't I choose to end it rather than be put at the mercy of an uncaring society.
    fearlessfly
    11th Aug 2016
    11:28am
    I've just started listening to Andrew Denton's 17 part podcast "Better off Dead" - really interesting series: www.wheelercentre.com/broadcasts/podcasts/better-off-dead
    Teddyboy.
    12th Aug 2016
    4:04pm
    When to die should be the choice of the individual. Religious objections are not valid as they are probably only based on mythology.
    SKRAPI
    12th Aug 2016
    10:26pm
    The zealots like MP. Kevin Andrews R the ones who block it in Parliament .
    I wonder if they have sat with a loved one as they died a slow agonising death with no assistance except a late injection of morphine which anyway is an Qpiat & suppresses the lungs , so the patient may appear to die peacefully but in fact is too weak to move or say anything. But do we know how they feel. ?? what they think ??


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