21st Mar 2017

Australian retirees are among the happiest people in the nation

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Survey shows that Australian retirees are the happiest people in the nation.
Leon Della Bosca

According to the AMP Happiness Survey, Australian retirees are the happiest people in the nation, with humour, financial security and leisure time the factors responsible for their satisfaction.

The survey of over 1040 existing AMP customers revealed that 79 per cent of them are happy with their lives – 68 per cent of those surveyed even said they were ‘thriving’.

That’s the case right now, but notions of the future aren’t so bright.

When the survey participants were asked how they thought they’d feel in five years’ time, over half (51 per cent) said they were pessimistic about the future.



When it comes to retirement satisfaction, economic security is consistently one of the most important factors. With the changes to super rules and threats of Age Pension cuts, it’s not so surprising then, that the future for many Australian retirees seems ‘uncertain’.

“Having a solid foundation in place is important but it’s not just about how much you have, but also how informed and confident you are with your choices,” said AMP Director, Superannuation, Retirement and Investments, Vicki Doyle.

“Being actively engaged with your finances and having a plan in place can go a long way towards achieving economic security.”

Other key findings of the survey include:

  • 71 per cent said they were either “satisfied” or “slightly satisfied” with their life
  • around one third of respondents say they are happy every day
  • 77 per cent said they were happy several times a week
  • those with an income greater than $250,000 are 14 per cent happier than those with an income of $80–99,000 (78 per cent versus 64 per cent).

 

According to Ms Doyle, Australians need to set goals to improve their level of optimism.

“Having and setting goals is a great motivator and gives people more satisfaction and happiness,” she said.  “Whether your goals are financial, relationship, or health related, getting your goals clear and putting them in writing makes them more likely to be achieved!”

Opinion: proof of older Australians’ resilience

Although they’re happy right now, Australian retirees have a right to be concerned about the future, especially as they seem to be a consistent financial target deemed ripe for the picking.

Changes to super rules, most of which kick in from 1 July 2017, and more recently, the speculation over the Liberal Party’s plans to cut Age Pensions, have many retirees worried about their future. Add to that the possibility that the family home could one day be added to the assets test and you have a recipe for concern.

YourLifeChoices regularly conducts surveys of its members and, consistently, health and money are their two major concerns. In the YourLifeChoices Insights Survey 2017, 31 per cent said that the timing of their retirement was mostly influenced by health, followed by money at 27 per cent. Still, the majority of respondents rated their health as good (59 per cent) and excellent (18 per cent), with 18 per cent rating their health as fair.

In the Retirement Affordability 2017 survey, YourLifeChoices members were asked how they rate their standard of living in retirement. Although around 61 per cent said it was ‘about what they thought it would be’, 23 per cent said it was ‘worse than they thought it would be’, with just 12 per cent saying it was ‘better than they thought it would be’.

Perhaps what is more telling is the state of their retirement income. This is where the real worry for the future lies.

We asked our members what they find are the most challenging aspects of retirement affordability. They are, in order:

  • housing affordability
  • budgeting
  • affording small indulgences
  • understanding the connection between age pension and superannuation.

 

So, housing affordability is a major concern. And with our rapidly ageing population and the lack of housing options, that concern will only grow over time. When our members were asked if they could afford to meet their weekly needs if they didn’t own their home, 31 per cent said no and 26 per cent said they would struggle.

The current line of thinking is that housing affordability is a problem for younger families. Tell that to the 15,000 homeless older Australians and, especially, the estimated 2000 Australians over the age of 75 who are sleeping rough on any given night.

When asked how they felt about their cost of living, 79 per cent feel that their cost of living is rising faster than the inflation rate.

Around eight in 10 of Australian retirees are unsure of, or know that, their retirement savings will not last as long as they will, with 62 per cent saying that what they have is not enough to live a reasonable lifestyle.

For 39 per cent of YourLifeChoices members, the Age Pension is their largest source of income. When asked if it was enough to live on, a resounding 79 per cent said “no”. So, it’s probably no surprise that 77 per cent of respondents believe that the Government is not doing enough to support retirees.

And it’s little wonder that older Australians are worried about the future.

I was talking to someone the other day and she said to me that the barometer for a fair and successful developed nation is how it treats its elders. Suffice to say, our older population seems to be looked upon as either a burden or a cash cow. It’s time that thinking changed.

Pessimism aside, according to the AMP survey, Australian retirees are still the happiest people in the nation. Financial hardship, waning relationships and public image are not enough to bring our older population down. Now that really says something about resilience, perseverance and a positive attitude.

Maybe younger generations could learn something from their forebears?

Are you happy? What are the most important factors that contribute to your happiness? How do you feel about the future?

Related articles:
Five steps to a happier life
What happiness meant 80 years ago
Can money buy happiness?





COMMENTS

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Ted Wards
21st Mar 2017
10:26am
At 52 Im quite happy with my lot in life. No one knows what is going to happen tomorrow let alone thirty years into the future. Im saving, travelling, working and living life every day. No use putting things off because we never know what tomorrow will bring, and its only a promise, not a certainty. Live life, this isn't a dress rehersal
TREBOR
21st Mar 2017
11:25am
What disgusts me is Howard and Co guaranteed their personal retirement scheme by transferring nearly $130Bn or OUR money to the Caymans in the futures Fund, which pays no tax here, but makes up for it by baying Peter Costello a heap to 'run' it.

At the same time there is no guarantee of anyone 'outside' this inner circle's retirement package being safe from market plummets, policy changes by the same government that cops so well from OUR Caymans money, or even, quite simply, from this nation hitting rock bottom, as is very much on the cards.

The cupidity of these thieves leaves me flabbergasted, and what is required NOW is a fully guaranteed and one-stop retirement scheme for ALL, starting with returning that stolen $130Bn to Australia and then combining social security contributions still paid in income tax with super funds.

Of course - this grand scheme MUST be kept totally insulated from the grasping hands of politicians past and present, and from their mates currently pulling in a motza from running all these 'privatised' funds around at the moment.
Old Geezer
21st Mar 2017
11:56am
If that is all you have to worry about Trebor you have little to worry about.

I certainly don't want a one-stop retirement scheme for all.
TREBOR
21st Mar 2017
12:01pm
We'll catch up to you in good time, OG...... you can fool all of the people some of the time....
Old Geezer
22nd Mar 2017
11:58am
Better be quick Trebor then.
Tom Tank
21st Mar 2017
11:51am
The survey was of AMP customers so a question here is what amount of super were they able to accumulate?
Perhaps for more ordinary people the picture is not so rosy with greater concern over age pensions.
Old Geezer
21st Mar 2017
11:59am
From what I know about AMP their returns have not been that great for investors in their managed funds and their share price has been moving sideways for the last 8 or so years with no capital growth.
Farside
21st Mar 2017
12:22pm
A few years ago AMP managed to squander nine months of 12% super contributions on a good salary within a couple of years as a result of low/negative returns and fees and were surprised I would not add funds to the account. I would not recommend them to anybody.
Old Geezer
21st Mar 2017
1:02pm
I could write a book about AMP and others on the tricks they play and what they get away with and have done in the past. I haven't invested in managed funds since 1987 and never will again.
thommo
21st Mar 2017
12:08pm
Your caption on your email says "is your retirement missing the mark?"
Well the answer is Yes. And you wonder why.
I retired in 2014 based on the rules current at the time, not thinking that this government would ever break a solemn promise not to change pensions, which they did as from 1.1.17 due to changes to he assets test in the 2015 budget.
I planned my retirement in 2014, having done all the sums etc.
But that was not to be. As a result of the changes to the assets test, I've lost $10K+ part age pension, and you have the hide to ask if my retirement has missed the mark.
Whats the point of patronising this publication
Old Geezer
21st Mar 2017
12:11pm
All it means Thommo is that you will have to make up the short fall from your ample capital. Changes happen all the time so just adjust to them and enjoy your life instead of wasting time whinging.
thommo
21st Mar 2017
2:21pm
old geezer. You're obviously a LNP stooge..I'am entitled to rely on the rules and that there will be no retrospectivity...
CindyLou
21st Mar 2017
7:08pm
I usually don't comment on these threads but have to state that I feel it's wrong to change the rules, shift the goalposts after people plan carefully plan their retirement monies. Changes should be 'grandfathered'. It doesn't affect me personally but I feel it's wrong - nothing really is certain now.
Old Geezer
21st Mar 2017
10:29pm
Anyone who carefully panned their retirement without change is mind has done themselves a disservice. Grandfathering is not a good idea at all. The only thing certain is that change will happen so plan for it.
CindyLou
22nd Mar 2017
9:03am
Given that people don't have crystal balls, I wonder how an individual can "plan" without knowing the facts; I think it is very responsible to think about your financial future, prepare and plan...as I stated above, changing the rules after an individual retires is I believe wrong - doesn't encourage you get folk to be responsible and organized.

How can an individual plan for every single situation/change ? Impossible, people pay financial planners in some instances for such plans only to have this expensive planning voided.
CindyLou
22nd Mar 2017
9:06am
Correction above ""doesn't encourage younger...."

Darn iPad is getting old !
Old Geezer
22nd Mar 2017
9:45pm
A plan is only a target to aim for at a given time. It is an ever changing target that changes as conditions change. Static plans are useless and never work. Nothing in life is certain so can't have anything that is certain in life as life doesn't work that way.

Am I organised? Today yes tomorrow maybe not.

So you have to plan given the current facts knowing that they can change and your plan should show you what to do when things change. If it doesn't then it is not a real plan at all.
CindyLou
23rd Mar 2017
12:10am
Well OG if that's the case that changes are to be expected, and that nothing in life is certain, then the government needs to put a caveat - notation on all their policies & procedures, "subject to change at any future date". So therefore, with this philosophy, nothing really is firm - shifting sands, wonderful.

Personally it does not affect me at all, however, in my opinion, it would take a lot of imagination for people to prepare for the unknown. To me it's a bit odd, planing what to do when things change but having no idea what the changes could be.

Everyone's entitled to their opinion - such is life.
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
11:12am
I agree with you Cindy Lou. People cannot be expected to plan for the unknown. Governments have a responsibility to provide guidance. But this government has not only shown incompetence, but also lack of integrity in breaking a solemn promise it made to secure our votes. That's not acceptable.

If changes are to be expected, at least we should be able to expect honesty and fairness. There should be a phasing in that allows EVERYONE affected to adjust their circumstances - not just the fortunate who fall into a particular age bracket (and can therefore gift) or those who have yet to decide on their retirement home.

And changes should benefit the nation, not be stupidly rash and ill-considered based on wild BS assumptions about who can or can't afford to support themselves. They should be mathematically sensible - such that they insure maximum incentive to be self-supporting. To structure change to encourage over-spending, manipulation and dependency and reward people for saving less is just plain stupid and will compound the deficit.
Old Geezer
23rd Mar 2017
3:26pm
If 18 moths was not enough time for people to change their affairs then they have not planned well at all. If people plan so close to the wind that a small breeze cause havoc for them then they need to have a more flexible plan. ie If you planned so that you got a $1 in OAP then of cause any asset change would be a problem to you. Time to clean up after the party now.
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
5:04pm
18 months was NOT enough and that has NOTHING TO DO with people's planning. It has to do with Centrelink rules, which were very STUPIDLY changed in a way that disadvantages taxpayers and the government and will drive pension costs up. I repeat, to structure change to encourage over-spending, manipulation and dependency and reward people for saving less is just plain stupid and will compound the deficit.
Old Geezer
24th Mar 2017
7:27pm
Rainey it hasn't made any difference to my spending or saving. Also no difference to those who get the OAP because they have no other means of support. It has only affected those who have manipulated things so that they get some OAP to get the benefits. The sooner they only give those benefits to only those on the full age pension the better. Heard that his could happen in the May budget as it is supported by both major parties.
Rainey
27th Mar 2017
10:30am
Many who are losing are 1000 times needier than those who are collecting full benefits. And the kind of changes you support will make that situation 1000 times worse, OG. Only a fool condones a system that encourages and rewards manipulators and punishes the honest hard working and frugal.
Liverpool Anne
21st Mar 2017
12:16pm
WE are getting a $8.00 per fortnight pension increase. Unfortunately the rise in both Car insurance and registration fees are more than $10 per pension. Heaven knows what the increase will be in council rates. We are slowly losing ground and I feel for those who do not own their own home, it must be frightening.
KB
22nd Mar 2017
2:14pm
Liverpool Anne I do not own my own home along with many others. Cost of living keeps going up. There is talk that the the government wants to take away our concession cards .Too costly. Without the concession card many people would not be able visit health services.
KSS
21st Mar 2017
12:49pm
Another pointless 'survey of the bleed'n' obvious'! So AMP conducts a survey of its members and what do you know? The majority are satisfied and happy with their lot!

YLC conducts and equally dubious survey of ITS members and what do you know? The majority are not satisfied or happy! Who'd have thought!!

So who's right? One or other or both? I guess it all depends who you ask and how.
Old Geezer
21st Mar 2017
12:53pm
Why aren't you happy KSS? Gosh I'm happy to see the sky every morning knowing I'm still alive so I can enjoy my life.
KSS
21st Mar 2017
1:12pm
What makes you think I am not happy Old Geezer? Just pointing out these two surveys are about as useful as research from the 'Ponds Institute'!
Oldman Roo
21st Mar 2017
9:55pm
KSS , I fully agree with you and I am one of the AMP Customers not at all happy or satisfied . They should know it because they have all my financial details and be aware that I have hit poverty level in income since losing $ 500 per fortnight under the pension reform changes .
I think they and other financial advisers are most likely concerned about a loss of business and Customers . After all under the new Liberal order it is foolish to work hard and save just to find out what a foolish idea that was in old age .
So who needs Financial Advisers when anything in excess than the full pension entitlement is an encumbrance .
MacI
22nd Mar 2017
7:48am
Oldman Roo, While I agree that losing $500 per fortnight is a slug to your income I don't think most retirees would think of you as having hit poverty level. If you have lost $500 per fortnight then you probably have around $780K in assets if you are a couple or $620K if you are single. It does mean that you will have to draw down on your assets to maintain your standard of living but take heart as you draw down on your assets your Age Pension will grow at twice the rate it used to.

I don't mean to belittle such a slug to your Age Pension. I understand that it is a kick in the guts as it has been my experience as well but it really bugs me when people with sizeable assets when compared to the majority of pensioners cry poor. They need some perspective.
Radish
22nd Mar 2017
6:17pm
I was an AMP customer in the dim dark past but I saw the light and got out...best thing I ever did!
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
11:19am
Macl, I would agree with you except that I can't find more than a tiny handful of responsible, honest people who are genuinely poor through no fault of their own. Sure, a minority have suffered misfortune. I support looking after them as well as possible. But the vast majority of those who are taking handouts from the taxpayer have either manipulated to get a pension or were irresponsible during working life and didn't bother to save. And it's grossly unfair that those who responsibly saved and have genuine substantial future needs are now being stripped of their capacity to meet the needs they planned and budgeted to accommodate. Frankly, I'm a little tired of this BS argument about need vs greed, because those who gambled, drank, partied and holidayed lavishly are NOT any needier than those who saved carefully but have major looming expenses.

The system is a disaster, because it rewards irresponsible behaviour and punishes the frugal, and it encourages manipulation and dishonesty. And until that is fixed, the cost of aged pensions will continue to rise. This government is disgracefully negligent and inept to even consider knee-jerk cuts to retiree income instead of addressing the major structural deficiencies in the pension system.
Old Geezer
23rd Mar 2017
3:30pm
I agree Rainey all those on the OAP should accrue a debt to be paid from their estate after they die. This will pick up those that have manipulated the system and also those with nothing more than their house. Not too much you can do able those who die penniless though. That day is coming so people need to plan to die penniless.
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
5:08pm
That is the STUPIDEST, NASTIEST, AND MOST UNFAIR change anyone could ever contemplate, OG. It might pick up a little from manipulators, but it would cripple battlers who have nothing but a modest home, and that's WRONG. People who work for 50+ years and pay taxes should be looked after in old age, regardless of whether they spend or save their earnings during working life. The nation owes them a debt. It's time this country stopped lining the coffers of the fat wealthy mongrels with gold ripped off the battling worker and started taxing the rich fairly and paying the nation's debt to the working class.
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
5:36pm
No doubt, OG, you also agree with cutting benefits to very low income families in order to fund bigger child care rebates to families earning $185,000 a year.
Old Geezer
25th Mar 2017
5:23pm
Rainey I don't agree with childcare at all. If you have children you should raise them not some one else.

People who have enough to support themselves do not need to be looked after by the taxpayer in their old age. OAP is welfare for those who have no other means to support themselves. It has nothing to do with how hard you worked, how long you worked, how much tax you paid etc. It is not a reward for anything. It is just a welfare payment so that at least the basics of life can be paid for in old age.
Rainey
27th Mar 2017
10:34am
I agree people who have enough should not be looked after by taxpayers. The problem is assessing what constitutes ''enough''. Pigs who work on assumption and have no respect for others presume to declare that they know what is enough. Decent people understand that age and future needs vary enormously. Family circumstances impose different needs. Health dictates future needs. The current system is BAD BAD BAD because it ignores all these critical variables and works on stupid assumptions such that it actually PAYS PEOPLE to have less. You can't get any more idiotically destructive than that! But some mentally deficient sheep endorse such lunacy just because they have the same nasty mentality as the LNP.
kamelmusic
21st Mar 2017
2:40pm
The attempt to 'talk down' the future prospects of seniors is at best speculative and at worst one-sided. The following quote seems to be politically driven: "Changes to super rules, most of which kick in from 1 July 2017, and more recently, the speculation over the Liberal Party’s plans to cut Age Pensions, have many retirees worried about their future. Add to that the possibility that the family home could one day be added to the assets test and you have a recipe for concern." At 78, I take a more balanced and tentative view of things!
floss
21st Mar 2017
3:26pm
Why is this Federal Government after retired people so much.Most have made this country what it is today they seem hell bent on putting the boot into older people. I have had the dubious pleasure of meeting a few politicians and have never been impressed.Some older people are most concerned and worried about the future.Most retired people will be worse off financially before this present government is removed.
Old Geezer
22nd Mar 2017
11:57am
Why shouldn't they target old people getting welfare that have ample means to support themselves. Welfare including the OAP should only be given to those who need it not to those who think they are entitled to it no matter how much they have.
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
11:23am
WRONG OG. The OAP is NOT welfare. It was structured as a retirement income plan. Those now contributing to super would scream loudly if the government confiscated their retirement savings, but that's precisely what it is doing to those of us who didn't have the benefit of super but accrued private savings responsibly, while rewarding the irresponsible and lazy.

The system is a disaster, and only the most dangerous sociopaths would condone the recent changes that have made it far worse, and far more costly to the taxpayer.
Old Geezer
24th Mar 2017
7:23pm
OAP pension is welfare because it is not your money but is a handout from the government because you have no other means of support. Super is your money and your money only. You put that money in either yourself or your employer did for your work. If you have no super it is no ones fault but yours for not putting money into super.

I'm looking forward to the May budget as it will be interesting to see how people react the changes it brings. Believe me you haven't seen anything yet.
Rainey
27th Mar 2017
10:38am
Crap, OG. It's OUR money that was paid into a fund and set aside to fund pensions, but corrupt and dishonest politicians STOLE IT and misused it. That does NOT reduce our entitlement to the benefit we bought and paid for.

Many of us didn't have the opportunity to have super, but those who did enjoyed massive tax concessions - TAXPAYER MONEY. In fact, superannuants bleed more from the taxpayer than pensioners do. You are TOTALLY WRONG OG. A nasty, mean, self-serving individual with no respect for others and no respect for FACT.
floss
21st Mar 2017
3:36pm
Thommo you are right on the money and your point of view is yours alone and what right has that excuse of a person who goes by the name of O.G. to comment on it.
Old Geezer
22nd Mar 2017
9:38pm
OG has just as much right as anyone else to comment and I found his comment very useful. A lot of common sense in that fellow.
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
11:27am
His name should be Nasty Old Idiot. He wouldn't recognize common sense if he fell over it, and he's the nastiest egomaniac I've come across in a long time. I agree with looney. He's an excuse for a person (definitely not human) and should go away.
Old Geezer
23rd Mar 2017
3:22pm
I think he should stay as he contributes a lot more useful information that anyone else on this forum. He put some extra sunshine in my day.
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
6:07pm
He's delusional. He should be wrapped in a white gown and taken away. Sociopaths are a danger to society.
Old Geezer
25th Mar 2017
5:12pm
Why then was he nominated for an Australia Day award for services to the community?
Rainey
27th Mar 2017
10:40am
That confirms it. Only those who lick at the backsides of the rich and powerful get awards like that.
Raphael
21st Mar 2017
4:00pm
79% of retirees are happy and 68 % are happy and thriving

Doesnt that tell you something - that our pension and super scheme add sup[port structures for retirees are the best in the world

The members "surveyed" on here must be the other 21% who whinge on here all the time
Old Man
21st Mar 2017
4:08pm
Is this another beat-up? I ask that question because the first part shows that those questioned by AMP were pessimistic about their future. Then we read that the future seems 'uncertain'. Then we have quotes by an Amp representative. Are all of these statements from the same survey or has there been a bit of cut and paste. From previous comments by the writer, I am not convinced that the article has not been skewed with a bit of editorial licence.

Then we have a survey done by contributors to this site where we are told that the biggest concern is housing affordability. Sure, housing affordability is a problem in some areas but what is not explained is whether retirees are directly concerned for themselves or if they are concerned because of family being unable to access the housing market. The survey question asking members if they could afford to meet their weekly needs if they didn’t own their home doesn't make clear whether it applied to non-home owners or if it is a hypothetical.

Articles such as these merely stir up the anger with those who are trying to survive on just an age pension, especially if they are renting, but do nothing to assist. Perhaps a petition in lieu of a survey may be more appropriate to show the government just how many people are affected by their decisions.
George
21st Mar 2017
4:15pm
Some useful numbers in the article, although I believe the YLC numbers are much more meaningful - especially about Age Pension - "When asked if it was enough to live on, a resounding 79 per cent said “no”". What is worse, this Govt is hell-bent on attacking the pensioners. Not that Labor cares either as before the election they refused to reverse the foolish & disgusting changes to the assets test from Jan 2017 (the changes from July 2017 are more sensible as they put caps where these were open-ended invitations for the rich to excessively exploit tax-breaks).

The only sensible solution to pensions is to pay all who paid taxes in Aiustralia for say 20 years the full pension without any tests, and then tax all income above that. Is any Political Party game to take this up, or indeed support a fair go for pensioners (as the Liberals have abandoned them???

Indeed, funding is not a problem for any social measures if Australia enforces an Alternative Minimum Tax (AMT) (as USA has had since 1969 which forced Trump to pay $38Mil tax in 2005) of say 15% on gross income for all Large Companies and rich individuals, Even Canada has the AMT, so what the hell have our so-called Labor and other parties been doing???
Patriot
21st Mar 2017
6:41pm
George,
Our Pollies - just about ALL of THEM - have just been looking after themselves and their MATES (FATCATs) who make sure they "Stay in Power" so that they can maintain this attitude.
SELF-SERVING UNADULTERATED GREED!!!!!
George
22nd Mar 2017
1:37pm
Absolutely agree, Patriot.

All Politicians (past & present) as well as all Govt employees & judges should have all pension entitlements removed and be forced to follow the same rules as others - then we might see some sense.
Again - Is any Political Party game to take this up??? We need a Trump - one who doesn't need the Govt's money - if only Malcolm had a bit of guts!
Jtee
21st Mar 2017
10:26pm
Ted Wards you are probably doing the right thing living for today and not putting things off. When you get to retirement at least you have had the full use of your money and the government can't get their hands on it.
Jtee
21st Mar 2017
10:26pm
Ted Wards you are probably doing the right thing living for today and not putting things off. When you get to retirement at least you have had the full use of your money and the government can't get their hands on it.
Jtee
21st Mar 2017
10:26pm
Ted Wards you are probably doing the right thing living for today and not putting things off. When you get to retirement at least you have had the full use of your money and the government can't get their hands on it.
Rae
22nd Mar 2017
8:13am
So 78% of those earning over $250 000 are happy. Too right they are.

And they quite possibly have it all tied up in trusts, or kept in an accumulation fund that isn't counted, and still get the full OAP.

64% earning over $80 000 are happy.

I wonder about the non home owner on $22 000. How happy are they?
Valerieaj
22nd Mar 2017
1:03pm
Does this "survey" extend to those who are non-house owners and have no assets or investments?
Probably not as they cannot afford access to the internet and no-one sends surveys by snail-mail with a stamped return-addressed envelope.
KB
22nd Mar 2017
2:10pm
One cannot think and plan too far into the future.It is better to enjoy each day as it arises better not to worry about what the government may or may not do with pensions as they come and go.
KB
22nd Mar 2017
2:10pm
One cannot think and plan too far into the future.It is better to enjoy each day as it arises better not to worry about what the government may or may not do with pensions as they come and go.
Old Geezer
22nd Mar 2017
9:36pm
Who cares what the government does? I don't as I'm flexible enough to negotiate my way around any changes.

I've got my life planned out for years now and half afraid the planning might soon go beyond my use by date.

Looking forward to the wedding in Cuba.
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
11:24am
And of course nothing matters to egomaniacal sociopaths except their own well being. The rest of the world can suffer hideously and that's just fine.
Old Geezer
23rd Mar 2017
3:17pm
Well Rainey I certainly live and embrace the present and the future as the past is just history and doesn't matter any more.

If others make the choice to suffer hideously that has nothing at all to do with me as I don't make choices for other people.
Rainey
23rd Mar 2017
5:02pm
Some of us have the decency and respect to care about others. And who said anything about the past? My concern is for folk who are suffering now. A little kindness and respect just might make life more tolerable for them, instead of nasty, mean remarks and selfish boasts.

I too am very happy and looking forward to a fantastic trip to spend time with a child I see far too rarely. But it disgusts me to see constant gloating and disrespect for others.
Radish
22nd Mar 2017
6:15pm
I am very happy in retirement and have been for 25 years. Life is good! No good being pessimistic...shorten your life...look on every day as a bonus.

A roof over your head, 3 meals a day, a comfy bed, a car to get you around. Glad with my lot in life...have a look around the world would you change places with someone say living in the desert in Ethiopia or Syria...I don't think so.

Be thankful for what you have not what you wish you had is my motto.
Old Geezer
22nd Mar 2017
9:33pm
I agree Radish . Life is just awesome. When I get sick of the mundane 3 meals a day, comfy bed etc I go exploring around our great country or if I'm really feeling adventurous exploring a different land.