Scientists flash for Alzheimer’s cure

A Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) study reveals that preventing or slowing down the onset of Alzheimer’s could be as simple as switching on a light.

It just needs to be the right type of light.

The MIT research flies in the face of the accepted theory that flickering light is harmful for people with neurological conditions.

This new theory comes after the team flashed strobe light near test rodents that had brain damage similar to that of Alzheimer’s patients. The results show that artificial flickering light could play a role in preventing cognitive decline and other neurological conditions.

When lights were flashed 40 times per second for one hour, the brain’s protective cells assimilated toxic proteins that can cause Alzheimer’s. The flickering was barely noticeable but had dramatic effects, even more so when the light therapy was conducted each day for seven days.

Just one hour of exposure was enough to reduce beta-amyloids in the brain for up to 24 hours. Beta-amyloids cause the brain plaque that leads to dementia.

If lights such as these were used as everyday lighting in households, the results could be miraculous. Using light therapy to reduce brain plaque seems to work better than medication, it has no side effects and isn’t painful or invasive, the research showed.

Read more at Lux Review

Would you pay a little extra for special lights that could reduce your risk of Alzheimer’s?

Written by Leon Della Bosca

Leon Della Bosca has worked in publishing and media in one form or another for around 25 years. He's a voracious reader, word spinner and art, writing, design, painting, drawing, travel and photography enthusiast. You'll often find him roaming through galleries or exploring the streets of his beloved Melbourne and surrounding suburbs, sketchpad or notebook in hand, smiling.
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