Senate to be sticking point

What happens with the Senate vote may shape politics for the next three years.

Senate to be sticking point

Australia has a new Prime Minister elect and the Labor Party is searching for a new leader, but it’s what happens with the Senate vote which may shape politics for the next three years.

As expected, Tony Abbott led his Coalition to a sweeping victory in Saturday’s federal election and while the results for Labor weren’t great, it wasn’t the landslide some predicted. Currently, it looks as though the Coalition will gain 16 seats and Labor will have lost 12 as of this morning.

For Tony Abbott it was the outcome he had been hoping for and, for Kevin Rudd, it was simply too much. Despite holding on to his own seat of Griffith, he has decided it is time for the Labor Party to find a new leader to fight the good fight. Mr Rudd announced on Saturday evening that he had called Tony Abbott to congratulate him and of his own leadership said, “I will not be recontesting the leadership of the parliamentary Labor Party. The Australian people, I believe, deserve a fresh start with our leadership. I know this will not be welcome news to some of you." In taking responsibility for the election loss he said, "Labor hearts are heavy across the nation tonight. And as your PM and as your parliamentary leader of the great Australian Labor Party I accept responsibility. I gave it my all but it was not enough for us to win.”

However, Labor and the Greens still control the Senate until July next year, which means Tony Abbott may find it difficult to pass some of the reforms he promised to implement in his first 100 days as leader. And it may not get much easier for the new PM once the new Senate takes its place as the Coalition looks to have lost one, or maybe even two seats in the Senate. While Australia won’t know the exact composition of the Senate for another two weeks, it appears that the minor parties may be the big winners. Clive Palmer’s Palmer United Party (PUP) looks to have secured two seats, and single-issue parties such as the Australian Sports Party and the Australian Motorists Enthusiast Party, so this is one seat each likely to make up the Senate landscape come July 2014.

Watch Kevin Rudd’s leadership announcement at ABC.net.au

Read more about the likely Senate make-up at TheAge.com.au

Watch Tony Abbott’s victory acceptance at SMH.com.au 

Opinion: We did have a choice

Many Australians may have felt they had no choice in who was to be our next Prime Minister, but when voting for the Senate, they made their opinions clear.

I’m not sure of the usual percentage of how many people simply vote above the line on a Senate paper, compared to those who go through the painstaking process of marking each individual candidate, but it seems that in this election, more people took the time to make their choice. The result will be a Senate which will have more minor and single message parties than we have ever seen before. While Labor and the Greens had held the balance of power for the last three years, the next three years may prove a little tougher for the Coalition.

I am normally an above the line voter, I never really throught that taking the time to select my preferences (1-97 in Victoria) would make a difference. This year, however, living in a safe Labor seat and seeing the writing on the wall for a Kevin Rudd led Labor Party, I thought I would take the time and make my vote count. Some research prior to Saturday made my hair stand on end – some of the policies which people chose to stand for were mind-boggling – and some just down right secular. The gun-totting fanatics, lovers of sexual freedom, protectors of animal rights and even those who chose to discriminate on skin colour and ethnic background all got the chance to try and secure my vote.

Some were quite sneaky in the way they went about it, calling themselves names similar to existing parties in the hope that weary eyes would not be able to differentiate. While others simply embraced their beliefs, no matter how bizarre they appeared to most people. And then there was Clive Palmer, who’s Palmer United Party, despite having been much maligned in the media pre-election about his seemingly unachievable promises, looks to have secured two seats, perhaps the same two Tony Abbott looks to have lost?

Having taken the time to complete the ballot paper, it pleases me to note that these single-interest warriors and minor players will have a voice come July next year. With the Coalition likely to have only 32 seats in a 76 seat Senate, it will require the support of Labor or the Greens – good luck with that – or six of the eight cross benchers, many of whom are single-interest candidates, to pass legislation.

So you see, we did have a choice and let us hope those choices keep Tony Abbott honest and accountable in the next three years.

Do you think the power battle will be won and lost in the Senate over the next three years? Or do you think that the minor parties will be happy to do the Coalition’s bidding?





    COMMENTS

    To make a comment, please register or login
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    11:12am
    I guess the senate will give the Libs someone to blame if their policies go awry.
    What worse an excuse to change them for the worse to get them past.

    A lot of people think that like the house of lords in UK the senate is redundant. Hate to think what would happen without it. This is apart from the fact that the house of lords is not elected and the senate is elected by the people.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    11:26am
    Another point to the above, Queensland does not have an upper house as it (the legislative assembly) voted itself out of existence. It was never democratically elected anyway as the members were appointed by the Governor of Queensland who was put forward by the lower house of the day anyway. A all that meant that members were put forward by a governor who leaned your way in politics. This made it meaningless as it would always be congregated by members of the same political leanings of the lower house.

    So instead of making it democratic by being elected they got rid of it.

    Fortunately this cannot happen to the senate as it would need a referendum to get rid of it. I don't think even the most irresponsible voter would put up with that.

    9th Sep 2013
    11:14am
    It will be interesting to see how many primary votes these micro parties got. Guess we are up for a double.disallusion
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    11:31am
    I don't think a double dissolution would fix the problem Pete, It could even make the problem worse for them. People obviously do not want to give them total power in the senate. I think a lot of people are looking back to what happened when they last had majority in both houses.
    Ozetwo
    9th Sep 2013
    12:53pm
    I am already doubly disillusioned by both major parties :)
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    7:46am
    Lucky the voters are disallusioned with labor and the greens .dubbbly.
    Nightshade
    9th Sep 2013
    11:27am
    WHAT HAPPENED ............... /?
    WE DID NOT VOTE LIBERAL
    WE DID NOT VOTE LABOR
    WE DID NOT VOTE GREENS
    Jurassicgeek
    9th Sep 2013
    3:34pm
    somebody did...
    Nightshade
    9th Sep 2013
    11:32am
    Mitt Romney is a religious leader.
    Especially in the United States of America no one was ever going to vote for Mitt Romney.
    Considering the mega bucks that the Republican Party had to are spent on getting the election right for a resounding win in America.
    Considering the SPIN DOCTORS / analysts ? shamans / etc :-
    Q:-
    Why in the name of the heavenly father did they choose Mitt Romney
    A Mormon Religious Leader of high ranking in the Mormon Religion ..... /?
    A:-
    They deliberately threw the election.

    9th Sep 2013
    11:33am
    Former Australian Prime Minister, Paul Keating, once famously described Australia’s Senate as “unrepresentative swill.” He was right. The composition of Australia’s Senate is bizarre. With equal representation (12 senators) from each of the states, Tasmania’s half a million voters has the same Senate clout as New South Wales’ seven million! There may have been some logic to protecting the rights of smaller states in the original Australian federation, but that logic has well and truly passed its use-by date.
    Nightshade
    9th Sep 2013
    11:47am
    The more the citizens of the United States vote away from the status quo.
    The higher the stakes for the powers that be become.
    How do you sack Wall St / Rothschild / J P Morgan .../?
    For that matter
    How do you sack the Reserve Bank of Australia.

    It is the nation & it's Government that should print the monies & the banking/financial sector & borrow with interest & not the other way around.

    The population therefore need to be "scared into submission" & /or "placed under control"
    Where is our knight in shining armor, because we the people are in real trouble here.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    12:18pm
    Pete, the Senate is the only way the smaller states can stop being bullied into submission by the larger states. The way it was set up was to stop this bullying as is the want of bullies. States like Tasmania would be forgotten in the wilderness and would probably end up worse off than the are perceived to be now.

    The fact is, the senate is the only area that people can modify outlandish claims that "We have a mandate" when the fact is some of the parties key policies people do not want. This is shown in polls that people want to keep the carbon tax, most are against the PPL and others.

    This to me demonstrates that the Libs got in because of the other mobs infighting rather than their what they called key policies.

    But what are people supposed to do. In essence they only really have two parties to vote for in the lower house.

    If people were overwhelmingly supportive of all of the main Liberal policies surely that would have been reflected in the senate voting.

    I also think that it may be dangerous for the Liberals to force a double dissolution as there will be a new leader of the ALP. They would have learnt from their mistakes and put forward a better campaign. It could be possible that the Libs may even lose seats they gained in the lower house as people reflect on their previous choices.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    1:22pm
    Shorten or Albanese are both tainted with sleaze A renewal I don't think so .
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    10:43pm
    sleaze..Pete... sleaze! Oh please, give me a break. You have Abbott bending over for Murdoch and who will gladly sell out Australia to pay back Murdoch's Bounty and you call Shorten and Albanese sleaze.

    Albanese in particular, can NOT be called a sleaze... goodness, you have got a real bad case of MURDOCHitis.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    7:44am
    Albanese saved mc Donald who is on his way to jail .
    You only have one view point that us anti Mr Murdoch and you destroy any intelligent conversation with your rants . Your outrageouse claims have been proved false on here by me and others yet you still repeat them .
    BrianP
    9th Sep 2013
    12:41pm
    I have just taken part in the Election as a Senate Candidate. There is a lot of misunderstanding about the Senate. It is the only place everyday Australians can have direct representations to let their views be known and modify a majority government's policies. Malcolm Fraser recently said, "The major parties should not be in the Senate".

    The ideal solution is for all voting public to be made fully aware of their power through the Senate. If people are careful who they vote for, it is possible to have a very good way to change government policies, if the majority of people don't like them.

    While we are waiting for the Australian Electoral Commission to do a better public awareness campaign for the Senate, we can all do something useful by spreading this info. That way, we can have a Senate and government policies controlled by the people we elect.

    Further info can be found on my Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/SenateCandidateBrianParkes
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    12:49pm
    It is not democratic when someone can be elected to the senate on a primary vote of 142 votes and then get elected on. Shopping preferences who the voter has no idea of .
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    12:52pm
    What party did you stand for Brian and where did you direct your preferences and how many primary votes did you get .
    carmencita
    9th Sep 2013
    3:10pm
    I still think there has to be an election reform (change to direct voting) so that our (voters) choices could be really counted as opposed to the current system of preferential choices.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    4:51pm
    The problem with direct voting is that a party could get in with just 40% of the vote disenfranchising 60% of the people.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    7:52am
    That is a result of having electorates which are heavily numbered by supporters of one party . and non compusary voting . But the examples here in the Senate are disgraceful.
    qbeebill
    9th Sep 2013
    12:44pm
    Give Mr Abbott an chance top govern the country, the senate will keep him in line if the single parties are not brought under his thumb.. The we will see a full double disputation of the government and then the people of Australia will have a real chance to say who they really want in power .And then they will have no reason to complain..They will have Elected who they want in...qbeebill
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    10:49pm
    Arrh... in a normal situation that just may occur BUT you forget MURDOCH's control over our MEDIA.

    The people were unaware of how BRILLIANTLY Australia has been managed during the GFC and that Australia's economy IS STILL (at this moment) the BEST in the WORLD.

    So how do you think the public will find out about the ineptness and incompetency of ABBOTT and his clowns.....Murdoch will NOT tell us!
    Nightshade
    10th Sep 2013
    11:52am
    Poor Old Murdoch.
    I suppose that is what a front man is for.
    seth
    9th Sep 2013
    12:45pm
    The libs may get a taste of what they have dished out the last six years, not withstanding Abbott as an opposition leader did what an opposition does, oppose everything, with fear and malice.and it worked. Most still believe what they read.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    12:58pm
    The coalition won the last election with more members elected than labor . Labor governed wits as a minority governmement . The coalition did not oppose everything and in fact sided with the govt on several bills opposed by the greens . The greens also sided with the opposition on bills such as ETS. A d defeated the govt and Turnbull and two lib senators who crossed the floor . The people have spoken labor has the lowest vote in a hundred years and the coalition should. Be allowed to implement t it's policies that it took to the people .
    qbeebill
    9th Sep 2013
    1:01pm
    Seth, In some ways you are right ,Mr Abbott will get what he deserves, the Greens ,the Lab our, and the Independents and Single interest parties may not be easily changed to his point of view.. Politicians are there to look after the People and not big bushiness or themselves.. qbeebill
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    1:01pm
    You are wrong that an opposition just opposes the coalition worked with Hawke on privatization tariff reform floating the dollar and would have spoted Keating on the GST he wanted .
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    1:24pm
    You can expect the greens to support the coalition on PPL as a work condition
    dougie
    9th Sep 2013
    1:44pm
    How can Labor say that the LNP Coalition were negative the whole life of the previous Government and then joyously shout from the roof tops the number of Legislative Acts that were passed? Somebody must have supported them. An opposition is there to keep the Government honest. Is it honest to say No Carbon Tax in the Government I lead and four days later talk of the introduction. The LNP tried to keep them honest.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    10:55pm
    dougie,
    That's because GILLARD negotiated rather brilliantly to form government and to get various legislation through. Got nothing to do with the Libs being negative?

    The negativity and Murdoch's constant barrage of disgusting personal and other dirty attacks (mostly with NO basis or founding) did not stop legislation. It just ensured that Labor got chucked out, even though they put Australia's economy at the very top of the world.... amazingly sad isn't it... you will never read about it though!
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    7:55am
    Thanks to the hard work of two of Labor's best performers, and the support of the Coalition, it is now assured that disability services will never again disappear from political view, writes Annabel Crabb.
    Pete
    9th Sep 2013
    2:35pm
    Mr Robb said beyond the first $10 billion tranche of stimulus, which the Coalition supported, the government grossly overreacted and should have moderated its approach.
    Pete
    9th Sep 2013
    3:09pm
    Taxpayer dollars have been wasted on projects that do little, if anything, to advance Australians research needs. For example:
    The quest for the ‘I’ – a$595,000 grant aimed at “reaching a better understanding of the self”;
    $160,000 on an examination of “sexuality in Islamic interpretations of reproductive health technologies in Egypt”;
    a $443,000 study into “The God of Hegel’s Post-Kantian idealism”; and
    $164,000 for a study into “how urban media art can best respond to global climate change” .
    Australians can’t afford three more years of waste like the last six. As late as last week $900 stimulus cheques from the global financial crisis were still being sent out.
    wally
    9th Sep 2013
    1:00pm
    We need to wait and see what the final make up of the Senate is after the votes are counted, and in some cases, recounted after challenges, before we try to predict what will happen there. Until we do, all of the "Wishin' and Hopin'" expressed above is simply irrelevant. Nightshade's references to the goings on in the United States make me wonder if Australia has become the 51st state or has the US joined us as the 7th state?
    Does Australia need a "Knight in Shining Armour" to lead us to some sort of "Promised Land" or Paradise on Earth? No doubt we have plenty of people willing to take up that burden (the hapless Kevin Rudd the most recent) but experience of the 20th Century shows that more often than not, the self proclaimed "Messiahs'" good intentions wound up paving the road to Hell instead.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    1:18pm
    Probably the only road to hell is for some of the poor refugees. For the rest of us do we need a "Messiah" what is so bad in this country to need one. Who is starving.
    Aloysius
    9th Sep 2013
    1:01pm
    The Senate is supposed to represent the States. It ceased to do that long before anyone can remember. It is now useful in its committee work but it does not perform the function for which it was established. The preferential voting system for the Senate is a farce. The micro parties will dominate the Senate. The Australian Motoring Enthusiasts Party could secure a Senate spot in Victoria, while the Australian Sports Party may pick up a seat in Western Australia. The Sports Party only had 225 primary votes and it is ridiculous for it to claim it represents the people at large. The Senate is a waste of taxpayer money. Given the duplications between Federal and State governments a case could be made for abolishing the State parliaments as well as the Senate. We are seriously over-governed.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    1:20pm
    Suddenly everyone is for states rights if you beleive that we should make the states stronger and central govt weaker and stop duplication . Why does the Feds have a health dept but no hospitals an education dept but no schools . The Feds have too much money and the states who deliver not enough .
    Huskie
    9th Sep 2013
    1:22pm
    I totally agree with the abolition of the States and their Governments but there is still a need for a "House of Review".

    The framers of the Constitution intended that the primary role of the Senate would be to protect the interests of the less populous states in the Federal Parliament by giving equal representation to all states. As was foreseen by some of the framers, soon after federation parliamentarians began to vote as members of political parties rather than as representatives of states. While this has obscured the role of the Senate as a protector of the less populous states, the state-based system of representation has ensured that legislative decisions are not made only by the representatives of the more populous states. The Senate has also assumed greater importance as a check on the power of the government of the day. The framers’ design of the Senate has enabled it to perform this role effectively.
    FrankC
    10th Sep 2013
    10:52am
    I agree Aloysius, , preferential voting is a farce, and the most unfair system there is. We have a system where the major parties are dependent on getting the votes from another party to secure their position, that is so stupid, and they say that our system is based on the Westminster system, - obviously they don't know how it works up there, or voted in the UK.And some of the results are not decided here by Monday, two days after the election, -I can recall on one occasion that it took until a Thursday before the final results in an electorate were decided. Under the UK system, the results are known on the night of the election, without waiting for people who live overseas to have their vote counted. Why would you vote for a government of a country you no longer live in??!!-- I don't , why should I. I also feel that compulsory voting is not democratic, especially getting fined for not voting! Yes we are over governed i.e.Local councils. They should not be party oriented, there is no need for them to be in any party whatsoever, what is the point?
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    1:07pm
    It is good to see (so far) that people are commenting without needing to venture into denigrating people, casting slurs and so forth on commentators. So far the main culprits on other threads have not picked this one up yet. You will know them when they do.
    sensible senior
    12th Sep 2013
    10:49am
    WHO ARE GTHE MAIN CULPRITS WSTATION
    Wstaton
    12th Sep 2013
    11:12am
    I am quite sure they know who they are and I am sure the majority of the sensible commentators do as well.
    sensible senior
    12th Sep 2013
    7:12pm
    well that is a cop out if you are going to stir you should be man or lady enough to state your facts .
    seth
    9th Sep 2013
    1:12pm
    A senate is supposed to check and refuse various proposals, not just by the two main parties. if no senate, just an elected government would soon evolve into a dictatorship.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    1:19pm
    Dead right Seth
    KKKKatie
    9th Sep 2013
    8:34pm
    With his American advisors I thought Mr Rudd must be setting himself up to be our first president.
    Wstaton
    12th Sep 2013
    9:10pm
    Most strange after they were first announced never saw hair or hive of them
    lauren
    9th Sep 2013
    1:19pm
    I agree with Pete, the Libs in opposition sided with Labour many times, but that does not a headline make, I guess most people are not able to see past what the Media feeds them, media defines for its readership and listeners what is, media are in the business of distorting facts and change with the wind, they are great at manipulating people, don't fall for it, get info. how Parliament works in your own nation and you will be able to think for yourselves. Media over the years have belittle Tony Abbott so much, those same media people are now saying different, wakey, wakey, get your thinking caps on.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    1:28pm
    You are right Lauren, media thrives on controversy not good deeds.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    2:30pm
    Thanks to the hard work of two of Labor's best performers, and the support of the Coalition, it is now assured that disability services will never again disappear from political view, writes Annabel Crabb.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    2:35pm
    Mr Robb said beyond the first $10 billion tranche of stimulus, which the Coalition supported, the government grossly overreacted and should have moderated its approach.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    3:09pm
    Taxpayer dollars have been wasted on projects that do little, if anything, to advance Australians research needs. For example:
    The quest for the ‘I’ – a$595,000 grant aimed at “reaching a better understanding of the self”;
    $160,000 on an examination of “sexuality in Islamic interpretations of reproductive health technologies in Egypt”;
    a $443,000 study into “The God of Hegel’s Post-Kantian idealism”; and
    $164,000 for a study into “how urban media art can best respond to global climate change” .
    Australians can’t afford three more years of waste like the last six. As late as last week $900 stimulus cheques from the global financial crisis were still being sent out.
    Bes
    9th Sep 2013
    1:25pm
    I worked at an 'early vote electoral station' (primarily for FIFO and people going away, and also I handed out how to vote papers for a candidate on election day. (On site at 04:35am erecting signage and finished at 06:00pm) Not for Labor or Liberal.
    Over the two weeks I watched people who were merely handing 'how to vote literature' out from both Labor and Greens openly receive abuse.
    There seemed to be a clear mandate towards the Libs on the policies of illegal arrivals and the carbon tax.
    Yes the senate will be either interesting or it will force a double dissolution.
    The party's that suffered most are now licking their wounds and either preparing for opposition or re building their credibility.
    As I see it, should these party's force a double dissolution and play the very same cards that caused them to lose big time in the last game, they well may find that the populace have not changed their minds and give Mr Abbott full control. We Aussies don't suffer fools gladly or unwarranted cost.
    Once bitten twice shy, we as a nation want our borders controlled again and also for someone to prove once and for all that taxation will save the planet.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    1:35pm
    yes I agree maybe taxation will save the planet as long as everyone pay what they should (and I am sure the normal taxpayer does) But what about these conglomerates that are openly avoiding paying their tax (Google, apple, most of aussie banks and the banks worldwide) who are hiding all their profits in tax havens to avoid this.

    Fair go for all I say. T Abbott think about this.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    3:11pm
    Totally agree Wstaton it is a disgrace
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    4:55pm
    Probably the big disgrace is that nobody is doing anything about it.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    7:45pm
    It is an international problem and Obama tried to make it the top priority at the recent G 20
    Nightshade
    10th Sep 2013
    12:03pm
    The taxation sumba is no good when no one is working.

    Unemployment is massive today
    Tomorrow - Holden will be gone - Toyota will be gone - Alcoa is almost out the door;
    Who else I wonder .../?

    We traded our manufacturing industries for service industries like - the telecommunications services - where they rang us incessantly all day every day - AND - the government funded Employment Agencies - remember.
    THIS KIND OF BUSINESS DOES NOT GENERATE PRODUCT THEREFORE IT DOES NOT MAKE MONEY.

    The taxation sumba is no good when the bail-in will nip & tuck business like a sharp razor.
    Nightshade
    10th Sep 2013
    12:09pm
    The governor of The Bank of England, Mark Carney is out there banging his drum -
    "Politicians need to step up bank reform efforts," says Mark Carney at the Financial Stability Board.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    12:15pm
    Well Rudds made millions out of privatization of the old CES
    Nightshade
    10th Sep 2013
    12:20pm
    Hang on, just a cotton picking moment -
    Who the hell is Mark carney to be ordering the GOVERNMENTS OF THE NATIONS OF THIS PLANET AROUND
    And on behalf & the benefit of the banking sector

    Oh you silly thing - Regulators like Mark Carney are said to be -
    WAIT FOR IT !
    "THE NEW ROCK STARS" in today's world
    "Ma'm yes ma'm !" the political arenas chorus as they bow & scrape to their new IDOLS
    Nightshade
    10th Sep 2013
    12:26pm
    I GLANCE AT THE FINANCIAL TIMES EVERY NOW & THEN
    THE BANKS: SECTION
    THE NEW ROCK STARS ARE THE FINANCIAL REGULATORS
    Nightshade
    10th Sep 2013
    1:44pm
    Our boy Glen Stevens -
    The Governor of The Reserve Bank of Australia, in Martin Place N.S.W. applied for that job.
    I saw it on commercial TV news.
    Our Glen was at the airport with his P.A. (a beautiful looking woman).
    They were headed for The Mother Land, England no less.
    Glen had a job interview - ye he dunn !
    I wundad how come he was not taken the private jet ?
    I reckoned it was probably in the shop.
    Anyhow they took the other feller, Mark Carney didn't they - not rocket science that one.
    Our boy weren't good enough for um I suppose.

    HRH Prince Frederick of Denmark married our Mary
    Australia has it's very own Royal family - BLOOD no less.
    Them beautiful little kiddies of Our Mary is our very own Australian Royal Kiddies.
    Our beautiful Australian girls was never good enough for them Brits hey.
    I have no doubt that we could have found an Australian girl that was good enough for that squirrel face Charlie -
    On second thoughts, maybe not.
    student
    9th Sep 2013
    1:37pm
    it was indeed an interesting election. Mr. Rudd's speech was more like a victory speech. I wonder if Australia is ready for a lesbian leader?? I actually think Penny Wong is before her time just yet.

    Getting back to Debbie's question

    "... Do you think the power battle will be won and lost in the Senate over the next three years? Or do you think that the minor parties will be happy to do the Coalition’s bidding?
    ..."

    I think some of the minor Partys are stupid but others (like PUP) are to be watched. It depends on how much they will accept before they sell their souls. Mr. Abbott was very blunt in his criticisms of some before the elections but in politics, survival rules not necessarily decency :) The Libs have tried to destroy the Greens by preferring Labor above the Greens. The minor Partys may make it impossible for Libs to Rule but I doubt it. I think they will just make it hard, not impossible. I think they will hold the Libs accountable for what they do. Isn't this the purpose of the Senate?? To guard against a Dictatorship??.
    Aloysius
    9th Sep 2013
    1:46pm
    Independents with big egos and a blocking mentality only ned to see how Oakeshott and Windsor saw the writing on the wall and did not contest their seats again.
    Golfer
    9th Sep 2013
    1:39pm
    Can you believe that Kevin STILL believes others lost the election.
    He wouldn't FOR ONE MOMENT think he was in anyway at fault.
    He a nasissistic gnome!
    Aloysius
    9th Sep 2013
    1:49pm
    Simon says:
    To blame Murdoch et al for Labor's loss is to say Australians are uneducated, dumb fools incapable of deciding what we think is best for us - and in the eyes of Labor stooges, pseudo-true believers and party followers this is actually what these Labor stooges and pseudo-true believers think of us.

    Just as in the anthropogenic climate change debate wherein those who hold contrary views on the "consensus" that men are gods capable of changing the planet's homeostasis are branded heretics, fools and idiots; those who hold the contrary view to the "consensus" that only Labor has all the answers must be under the sway of the Murdoch press, or are simply intellectually challenged.

    This is an affront to the masses. No wonder Labor lost the election. They forgot the vast majority of people actually do think.

    True believers must be cringing. This is not the Labor Party of old. It's not the Labor party anymore.

    Memo to Labor stooges and pseudo-true believers: we the people will judge the performance if the new government just as we did the previous one. And if we vote it out, we don't expect Liberals to blame the ABC and suggest we're all too dumb to exercise our democratic rights wisely.

    Bring back real True Believers, bring back real Labor.
    tia-maria
    9th Sep 2013
    2:46pm
    Aloysius, Being bloody hash mate mate towards Labor voters dont you think??
    But is any Politicial leaders are true to their form these days I dont think so...........I was born in the heart of the Balmain Labor party area gosh how things have changes.
    Beware of the Rabbitt??? I mean the new PM just sit back until he shows his true colours and who will he blame for his blunders???????????
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    7:27pm
    Scrabbled
    Australia NEVER had it so good, especially in times when every other country would kill to have what we have. Yet YOU kicked out the person who did this amazing feat for and on behalf of ALL Australians. WHY???? Because MURDOCH told you to!!! That's why.

    You gave a U.S. Billionaire a green light to rape and pillage OUR wealth and you want to hide behind RUDD and BLAME HIM....oh please, give me a break!!!

    Aloysius
    Your statement......"To blame Murdoch et al for Labor's loss is to say Australians are uneducated, dumb fools incapable of deciding what we think is best for us" is so APT, well said.

    You have identified the extent of what three years of biased and destructive PROPAGANDA can do to a NATION.

    Why else would you vote OUT the ONLY government in the world that has placed their country's economy at the very top of the world, making Australia the most EGALITARIAN nation in the world and ensuring Australia's prosperity when ALL other countries are flailing.... USA, UK, EUROPE... to name just a few.

    THIS IS FACT..... so tell me, why would Australians do that, if it wasn't for PROLONGED and DENIGRATING PROPAGANDA!

    YOU are so DESPERATE to attribute this phenomena to something other than what it is..... aren't you!
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    7:49pm
    We were having an adult sensible adult conversation
    KKKKatie
    9th Sep 2013
    8:45pm
    But wasn't it all done with borrowed, that is, borrowed money?
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    10:28pm
    Pete.... well some were.... not so sure everyone was. When someone has trouble with FACTS and doesn't want to talk about them because MURDOCH hasn't told them what to think yet..... is that sensible adult conversation???


    KKKKatie
    Your one liner gives you NO credibility I'm afraid, bit embarrassing even.

    What borrowed money? Just like ABBOTT, you don't know the difference between PRIVATE DEBT and GOVERNMENT DEFICIT.

    What a GOOD government does, is utilise ALL its resources to ensure the country is managed to the best of its capacity, especially when the rest of the world is flailing desperately, and that is what RUDD did! They do NOT sit on their hands and HOARD money for NO reason other than to say you have some????????

    Rudd's timing and implementation of his short, medium and long-term plans were impeccable and in DIRE times, such as this, were essential to assure our economic well being.

    Oh! did you know that Abbott bragged about Australia's wealth and economic well being to overseas dignitaries but when he gets home he tells YOU how bad things are.... through his mate, Murdoch, of course.
    dougie
    9th Sep 2013
    1:50pm
    A thought as to how much Labor accepts the result of the election and the responsibilities of being elected to office. If as I think will happen, does happen and Carr resigns from the Senate
    would not the State of NSW be in order in not appointing another Union yap dog in Paul Howes but being as blunt as Joe Bjelke Peterson. all those years ago and place their own selection in the Senate. This person would then truly represent the State.
    Huskie
    9th Sep 2013
    2:56pm
    The situation you describe regarding the replacement of a Senator (the Bjelke Peterson scenario) cannot happen now. Following that incident the law was changed to the requirement to replace the outgoing Senator with one of the same Party.
    GH
    9th Sep 2013
    3:23pm
    Our difficulty stems from the way we have deviated from the accepted definition of democracy of government by the people for the people. We have embraced as the norm a two-party of system which limits the options of the electorate. When, as in this election, we are confronted with multiple issues but are confined to a largely "either/or" choice of the two major parties we are naturally going to look at how best to circumvent this dilemma. So people who disliked Tony Abbott actually voted LNP because they were weary of the factionalism of Labor and they disliked Rudd even more. Interestingly, the YourView questionnaire conducted by the SMH was most revealing in that it showed that on the basis of a range of well balanced, in-depth questions the large percentage of the public wisdom was closest to the Greens. This was not reflected in the results for the Lower House, but is quite apparent in the results for the Senate. For all its shortcomings the Senate is the safety-valve which we utilise in order to maintain equilibrium. The same people who voted for a majority government in the House of Reps voted for the right to apply the brakes on issues which could not be resolved on a black and white policy stance of two major parties. It is a clear message to Abbott that he has not been given a mandate on any policy. If the electorate had have given the LNP a majority in both houses then he would be within his rights to assume he had been given a mandate. Like her or loath her, we cannot ignore that the system worked remarkably effectively during the Gillard term of a hung Parliament and reliance on preferences from independents and a mixed bag in the Senate. We saw more reforms and bills passed than in any other sitting parliament. It was the closest we have been to true democracy that I can recall. The Senate may be cumbersome and could do with a good pull through, but we can never underestimate is importance or afford to do away with it.
    Aloysius
    9th Sep 2013
    5:53pm
    You must acknowledge that only half of the Senate stood for election. The other half remains in place. It is difficult to change the Senate in one election.

    9th Sep 2013
    3:30pm
    I hope that aqua & jaguar don't notice this or you will all be denigrated to the level of f..kwits & morons, & mussitate will say that the whole process was just a waste of time & money as Murdoch had already decided who was to stand on the podium & Rupert actually runs Australia. Just a couple of points. The reason we have the same number of Senators appointed from each State is that we are a Commonwealth of States, NOT a Commonwealth of citizens or populace. The reason we have such a debacle in the Senate elect is mainly because of the preferential system which was installed to make sure that we can never have a third viable Party. In this particular election the Democratic Liberal Party was first on the ticket & received an astronomical number of donkey votes & will hold at least one Upper House Seat as well as having a major effect on the last Seat won in the State. I believe that the Greens will oppose everything put up by the Lib/Nats, but I believe the minor Parties & Labor will back the changes. The minor Parties because they will note what happened to Windsor & Oakeshott. Also, Labor will not oppose, because they simply cannot finance a double dissolution next April or May. The really quixotic thing about a double dissolution is that Labor would probably get back Seats & the Greens would lose most of their Senate Seats.
    Pass the Ductape
    9th Sep 2013
    3:33pm
    Another three years of chaos is about all we're likely to get!
    tia-maria
    9th Sep 2013
    3:39pm
    Ductape I agree with you
    Not Amused
    9th Sep 2013
    4:19pm
    Micro parties with little to no policy experience or appeal to the wider community have targeted the senate as a way of getting themselves some power. A rather slimey affront to the majority of Australians who take our democratic vote very seriously.
    Question: Why didn't they target the house of the people --- the House of Representatives? Answer: because they knew they wouldn't get a look-in.

    So now we have the likelihood of the same unworkable situation as we suffered previously, only this time it could be worse. At least there will be no more Thomson/Slipper deals in order to prop up a lying, incompetent Julia Gillard. (Incidentally Julia Gillard is still under police investigation - later this year Labor might find themselves with very many more problems).

    I am in favour of doing away with preferential voting, having never liked the idea that a valid vote means I am forced to number candidates that I wouldn't even give the time of day. It is very wrong that so called "preferences" (in my case they are not preferred alternative candidates, just a means of making my one and only choice valid) end up benefiting individuals who may finish up, via arranged micro-party preferences, in a position to control the fortunes of our entire country.

    Reform of the electoral system would be best served by ditching unwieldy and non-representative preferential voting.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    5:06pm
    I most vocally disagree with doing away with preferential voting. It would cause more chaos. It means that someone could become a member of parliament with less than 50% of the vote could be as low as 30%. This means that the other 70% of the voters have no say whatsoever especially if a major reform was trying to be put through by this 30%.

    Leave our electoral system alone it has served us since statehood and we are still a democracy.
    Jurassicgeek
    9th Sep 2013
    5:19pm
    it is not the system that is the problem ..its the lack of competent people we can vote for....Think about it, if we had more qualified people running this country we would not be in this mess in the first place..
    Hasbeen
    9th Sep 2013
    6:00pm
    Don't be so silly Jurassicgeek. Universities & the education system are run exclusively by qualified people & look what a complete stuff up they have made of them.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    6:47pm
    Jurassicgeek, You should have stuck with the competent and left out the qualified.
    Jurassicgeek
    9th Sep 2013
    5:14pm
    I see another boat has arrived...maybe they were not told that they would stop on Election day...one promise already broken....lol
    Famous last words "We will stop the boats!!!..."
    GH
    9th Sep 2013
    5:26pm
    The most likely scenario is that we won't know whether there are any boats coming or not. Scott Morrison favours a media ban on the reporting of all boat activity. Now that is disturbing.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    5:31pm
    I presume you said this with tongue in cheek. Give them a bit of time, a couple of more days.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    5:38pm
    Oh yes, a media ban then we won't know whether they have stopped them or not. We have to take their word for it.
    GH
    9th Sep 2013
    5:46pm
    FYI http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/special-features/coalition-to-impose-blackout-on-asylum-boats/story-fnho52jp-1226709828599
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    6:30pm
    Blumming heck just read it. You would think we are at war or something. All they are are sorry refugees trying to escape draconian governments. This is what we have started to become a draconian government.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    10:08pm
    Olderwiser, Bloody hell, thanks for that.

    So, the policy under the ABBOTT/MURDOCH government is: "if it's too hard OR only highlighted to get the racist vote at election time, then simply BAN public knowledge of it - the problem will then disappear" Well, from the public's eyes anyway.

    Nothing needs to be done because "nothing is happening"..... what a jolly good start to a "full spectrum totalitarian democracy".... no folks, the word democracy in this instance, is not the word to focus upon.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    10:15am
    The news on economic refugees will be released by the Senior military officer in charge of coordinating all depts . Not by the minister . The same as the reserve bank now releases news on interest rates not the minister .
    Wstaton
    10th Sep 2013
    11:32am
    The senior military officer is not elected by us!
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    11:54am
    Nor is any civil servant including the Bureau of Statitics than release information on all sorts of things .as the coalition is going to appoint a leader on Economic refugees across several depts including Customs navy Immigration etc it makes sense to have one spokesman .
    Wstaton
    10th Sep 2013
    12:03pm
    And on a very touchy subject that should be a minister without any censorship.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    12:17pm
    The variouse ministers will still have to answer to Parliment
    aquatrek
    10th Sep 2013
    12:29pm
    2 working days have past - Abbot has taken control of the off course ship from the insane ex-capitan and has put it into dock for a refit - the refit needs an extensive examination so that the ship will stay on course in future - the enemy propagandists [Mussitate and Co] spies and wanna be saboteurs are milling around wondering what to do next. They dont have a leader so this messy milling around could go on for quite awhile.
    Pass the Ductape
    10th Sep 2013
    3:38pm
    The cruncher Jurassic was - 'When it is reasonable to do so." Covers a lot of ground does that.
    Hasbeen
    9th Sep 2013
    5:54pm
    I think we will find that most of the new senators will be in opposition to the Greens, on most important issues, & will be almost as good for the LNP as winning the seats for themselves would have been.

    Just look at it. Two from the miners party, well Palmers party, a motorists, a sports & a couple of others who will be all for stopping the boats, & getting rid of the carbon & mining taxes, & other Green garbage. I don't think Tony Abbott will have any trouble at all, getting his promises into law.

    About the only good thing you could say about Gillard & Rudd is that they let Whitlam go to his grave relieved of the tag of the worst Australian PM ever. He is not even close now.

    I must say I am in agreement with Not Amused. Preferential voting was a silly idea, pushed by the no hopers, & foolishly allowed by those who should have known better. A simple return to first past the post will overcome the stupidity in senate voting, & make the house voting much cleaner.
    Aloysius
    9th Sep 2013
    6:16pm
    Did you see ther motorists candidate on TV? Total yobbo dropping his daks and giving the bird. We're so lucky!
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    9:17pm
    Shows how indoctrinated you have been 'Hasbeen' by MURDOCH and the corporate (foreign) MEDIA because you are STILL not aware that RUDD/GILLARD have put Australia's economy at the very top of the world whilst the USA, UK, EUROPE and many other countries are flailing. Australia is the ENVY of the world, especially when we are the MOST EGALITARIAN country, as well.

    RUDD/GILLARD'S management of Australia has been extraordinarily BRILLIANT! Rudd is respected all around the world, except Australia because of Murdoch's Media PROPAGANDA which was prolonged, vicious and disgustingly biased.

    In contrast, Abbott is already a joke overseas... like GW Bush was.... both are fools who handed over their countries to corporate interests and sold out their people.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    9:29pm
    Re Preferential voting.... the concept is very DEMOCRATIC and after this election with the RIGGING and MANIPULATION of the senate by PAID entities, the process should be looked at. However, to remove preferential voting is to REDUCE our DEMOCRATIC processes which has been recognised overseas as one of the MOST democratic systems in the world. Hence, the need to eliminate RIGGING and to return to sane practices is all it needs.

    Your claim that "no hopers" support this DEMOCRATIC electoral procedure is ludicrous and simply shows that you are VERY limited in your capacity to understand politics, political systems and democracy.
    klo7
    9th Sep 2013
    8:07pm
    I have stated previously that 45% will vote as they have for generations.The balance of 10% consist of informal and about 5% to 7 ½% of swinging voters who would have made up their minds several months ago.

    As far as a leader of the Labour Party, probably Shorten has a chance as he is a labour union man although he has some baggage
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    9:06pm
    Shorten is good and hence will have disgusting media coverage by Murdoch and Abbott because he is a danger to them. Albanese, I like and he would do okay but is not a statesman and wondering if he would be more easily destroyed by Murdoch's media.

    Unfortunately, Abbott is already a laughing stock outside Australia... bit like GW Bush was, except the yanks are laughing at us this time! How embarrassing to have that fool representing Australia.
    Pass the Ductape
    10th Sep 2013
    5:06pm
    Shorten? Now I know you're mad Mussitate. What a dirty little backstabbing sod he is - runs with the hairs - and the hounds. You're welcome to him - as well as that fool Beattie.

    I'd love to know what it feels like to be a condescending know-it-all? C'mon - open up the thesaurus, lay some fancy words on me and give it your best shot. Don't stay up too late though....
    aquatrek
    10th Sep 2013
    5:19pm
    The Shorten baggage would seem to be a suitcase full of: a political knife arsenal, some of Roxon's left behind clothes, some AWU slush fund skeletons and a reputable brand of condoms.
    Pass the Ductape
    12th Sep 2013
    3:11pm
    'hairs' on the sole of my shoes....hairs on the sole of my shoes?

    Hares Ductape you fool - hares.

    9th Sep 2013
    8:18pm
    innes

    Where have you been old dear.... Glad to see you missed me so much.... first couple of lines and THERE I AM! Your going to have to get this obsession with me under control, my friend....

    Re: Murdoch. .... if you can..... give me an alternative reason why the government of the most SUCCESSFULLY MANAGED country in the WORLD was removed from office.

    The ONLY explanation is that three years of ABJECTLY BIASED, DESTRUCTIVE and RELENTLESS PROPAGANDA by Corporate (foreign) Media who ADDITIONALLY did not let the people know just HOW BRILLIANTLY our government was performing.... eventually takes its toll.

    The RUDD government placed Australia's economy at the very top of the world and the Australian public STILL thought that Australia was doing badly?????? The AVERAGE Australian was wealthier because the RUDD government turned Australia into the most EGALITARIAN nation in the world and ensured Australia's prosperity when ALL other countries were and are flailing.... USA, UK, EUROPE... to name just a few. However, the Australian public was unaware of this and thought the RUDD government was taking money out of their pocket instead of putting it IN their pockets.

    THIS IS FACT..... I can't wait for your explanation of why Australians threw out the MOST SUCCESSFULL GOVERNMENT in the WORLD, if it wasn't for PROLONGED and DENIGRATING PROPAGANDA!

    YOU are so DESPERATE to attribute this idiosyncrasy to something other than what it is... CONTROL of OUR MEDIA by (mostly) foreign self interest CORPORATIONS. You need some validation for voting AGAINST Australia.
    KKKKatie
    9th Sep 2013
    9:07pm
    But, but, I say again - wasn't it all done on borrowed money?
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    9:41pm
    KKKKatie
    What.....borrowed money? No! Just like ABBOTT, you don't know the difference between PRIVATE DEBT and GOVERNMENT DEFICIT.

    What a GOOD government does, is utilise ALL its resources to ensure the country is managed to the best of its capacity and that is what RUDD did! They do NOT sit on their hands and HOARD money for NO reason other than to say you have some????????

    Rudd's timing and implementation of his short, medium and long-term plans were impeccable and in DIRE times, such as this, were essential to assure our economic safety.

    oh! I forgot, YOU aren't aware that the rest of the world is in dire straits, are you...... that's because Australia has been managed BRILLIANTLY and WE are doing better than ever! FACT.
    student
    10th Sep 2013
    2:59pm
    did anyone see Media Watch last night?? I can't remember the figures but there was NO doubt the Murdoch Press favoured the Coalition with positive press.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    9:48pm
    Maybe they were doing their job of critising a corrupt incompetent govt
    GH
    10th Sep 2013
    10:09pm
    Student - Of 293 political stories - 6 pro Labor 43 pro Coalition. 5 anti Coalition 134 anti Labor. I think we could fairly describe that as an overwhelming bias. What cannot be measured is the impact that had on people's thinking. It certainly provided the content of most talk-back radio hosts who by and large lost all objectivity to their lasting discredit. Their influence was probably much more powerful as they endlessly hammered listeners stuck for hours in queues of traffic who would be in a hostile state of mind just by virtue of their circumstances. I have stopped listening. I can only take so much bigotry - and I am not just referring to their political rants. They are irresponsible and unprofessional. Gee! Power is a trust, and they have incredible power which they abuse endlessly.

    9th Sep 2013
    8:32pm
    Re: the senate. I disagree with the concept that Labor and the Greens have control. It is Wilkie, Palmer and Katter that will wield control because the "others" who represent Australia, are a joke.... thanks to the RIGGING of our system by PAID manipulators.

    I think ABBOTT is laughing really because most of the "others" will be easily taken care of... Murdoch will make sure of that and Katter is already in the bag on most things which leaves the Palmer Party ONLY and I don't think this party's ideology extends too far, even though the Murdoch Press ridiculed him, every chance they could, he is pliable.

    Hence, ABBOTT will have free range to "sell off" and pay Murdoch his BOUNTY.
    go veg!
    9th Sep 2013
    8:42pm
    I found Debbie's article reasonable but was offended that she lumped "protectors of animal rights" with "gun-toting fanatics and lovers of sexual freedom and even those who choose to discriminate on skin colour and ethnic background". Animal rights protectors just recognise that species other than humans have a right to live a safe life and generally believe in social justice for people too. It's not a weird concept and it's sad that none of the major parties have a reasonable animal rights and environment policy.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    8:47pm
    Good point 'go veg!'

    9th Sep 2013
    8:42pm
    EVERYONE that voted for LABOR you are amazing!!!

    With the amount of PROPAGANDA SPEWED OUT by MURDOCH which was unprecedented for Australia and you still saw through it....BRAVO, you are the few THINKERS that are still standing.

    As you know I am not normally Labor and am a member of the WikiLeaks Party but was required to support Labor, purely upon their amazing achievements and their egalitarian approach to improving Australia FOR Australians, instead of what Abbott represents, destroying Australia to enable the wealthy elite (foreign) to fill their pockets.

    You voted FOR Australia and Australians, for common decency and the well being of those more disadvantaged in this society.

    GOB SMACKED by your resilience and intellect.
    Aloysius
    9th Sep 2013
    9:50pm
    we're all gob smacked!
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    10:13pm
    It's alright Aloysius, we understand BUT it's really okay, you can be in BLISS for however long it takes for MURDOCH to strip your country..... because you WON'T READ ABOUT IT!!!!
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    11:09pm
    Mussel toff you blame Murdoch for Global cooling the falling worlds population Aids and the Australian Unions corruption get a grip man you are insulting the intelligence of the Australian voters.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    1:24am
    Should I call you a NAME TOO Pete... or do you think it okay to do it to others JUST BECAUSE their opinion is MORE INFORMED than YOURS!!!!

    I do like it, A LOT, when I can have a bit of FUN and don't have to be polite.....

    Now back to your ridiculous attempt at funny (yes, I am still being nice!), Murdoch doesn't give a damn about any of those things, so there is no need to go further on that one.

    In relation to "you are insulting the intelligence of the Australian voters"..... what intelligence!!!!! If you are a prime example of the Australian voter....say no MORE!!

    Oh! I am STILL being polite.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    9:50am
    Well I guess that says it all your contempt for Ausralians puts you outside civilized discourse .
    Wstaton
    10th Sep 2013
    10:08am
    Hmmm! maybe you should be talking to Simmo about civilized discourse as well Pete.
    Young Simmo
    9th Sep 2013
    10:49pm
    Saturdays choice was easy, TONY or the TURKEY?
    I see all the TURKEYS that follow the unions Eeerrrrrr, sorry LABOR, are still crying their eyes out. Maybe it is all the carbon getting into their eyes!
    As for Mussi-What's-His-Name thinking Murdoch is the new Prime Minister, somebody please bring him up to speed, Mussi-What's_His-Name that is.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    11:07pm
    Not crying at all YS

    Even RUDD didn't have a problem, he had given a hell of a lot of himself to make this country's economy the best in the world and then what happens. People believe a U.S. Billionaire and vote down a government that from an international view is the most successful government in the world.

    What more could he do. It was probably a relief to simply get out.... what would you do if you made a country prosperous, made it the best economy in the world, made it the most egalitarian in the world (FACT) and then, the people you were there for and helped the most, voted against you.

    Whilst Australian voters are INDOCTRINATED by MURDOCH's savage and self interest MEDIA, hey, it would be a relief to move on! He is wealthy in his own right, why would he bother further.
    Young Simmo
    9th Sep 2013
    11:15pm
    Careful Mussi, or I'll get Surfer onto you.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    11:32pm
    Arrhhh but which Surfer, you have put the one with a big 'S' but what of the one with a little 's'. We will see YS, I don't think it likely.

    His extremist one liners weren't even funny! Of course Murdoch will run this country, along with dear Gina.... Abbott knows where his bread is buttered and certainly how to jump very high when told to.

    Doesn't PM stand for Primary Marionette???
    surfer
    13th Sep 2013
    9:12am
    Hi Young Simmo, I am standing by ready to pounce. Beware of Masturbate, Foxy and Jaguar. Hope other contributers take note unless you are a labor ite.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    10:49pm
    It's amazing. I heard on the news tonight that the German government was being re-elected. The reason given was that they got Germany through the GFC relatively unscathed (virtually the only on in the euro zone that did) Out of interest I checked their publick debt. 2.2 TRILLION euros which equates to $3.1 Trillion. We kicked ours out because of $302 Billion. To put this into perspective this equated to 57 percent of GDP ours 11 percent. No wonder we are a laughing stock.
    Wstaton
    9th Sep 2013
    11:08pm
    Oh by the way, Canada is is 36 percent of GDP. New Zealand's is 26 so I guess those governments will get kicked out on their next election.
    Anonymous
    9th Sep 2013
    11:25pm
    Wstaton

    Thanks, I will follow that up... good info.

    Yes, we are a laughing stock which is a bit embarrassing. But wait until ABBOTT hits the international scene, then we will truly understand embarrassment.

    No refinement, no dignity and certainly no statesmanship.

    ABBOTT has already been put into the same category as GW BUSH.... cringe!
    Aloysius
    9th Sep 2013
    11:37pm
    Australia became a laughing stock when a succession of Aussie PMs took it on themselves to grandstand around the world and preach to other countries, most of which think that we're irrelevant. We are now hated for our interference and pompous behaviour. Kevin 07 was the worst of the lot. His travel budget was outrageous.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    12:06am
    Wstaton

    2012 Nett Govt debt to GDP in the USA is 88% and UK is 83% and rising! Wow, that is astronomical.

    China is 21% which is fine.

    Well, well... Iran is 1% only! The embargoes put on their country by the USA has backfired and appears to have ensured that they are self sufficient and therefore side stepping the GFC?

    Other than some small and minor countries that have a lower debt to GDP, Australia's deficit is MINIATURE in comparison.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    1:07am
    Aloysius
    What a lot of RUBBISH about RUDD and his overseas image.

    CHINA respect him even beyond his ability to speak Mandarin (the harder of the Chinese languages to speak).

    When HOWARD was in, INDONESIANS HATED Australia and Australians because of the way Howard's megalomaniac tendencies of thinking he was some sort of god and Indonesians were nothing. Rudd has had to undertake a substantial amount of DIPLOMATIC work to get them back onside. Opinion poles have shown that Australia is NOW very well regarded by Indonesia and Indonesians which is essential, as they are our nearest neighbours.

    Just to name a few.....

    The USA may not find Rudd overly helpful BUT who the hell wants to remain a USA lap dog/patsy. The USA have to 'get over' their outlook of Australia as being nothing important, although I must admit, they certainly know who we are now..... given our INCREDIBLE ECONOMY.

    NOW DOWN to the NITTY GRITTY that blows you completely OUT of the WATER.....

    HOWARD in 2002 ALONE spent $4.5million on 10 trips to US Europe Asia & Africa and during his time as PM spent 10% of his time overseas, racking up a O/S travel bill of $20million. According to a document tabled in parliament.... the costs also included his wife accompanying him.

    RUDD didn't even come close to this, as PM. Rudd probably spent more as the Foreign Minister to Gillard than as the PM on overseas trips.

    You will have to do better than that Aloysius.... give some facts rather than made up stuff aye! You have been reading too many Murdoch papers.
    Aloysius
    10th Sep 2013
    10:37am
    The point of my comment was that our PM should concentrate on the government of Australia and not the rest of the world. I said a succession of PMs and that includes Howard. Kevin was still the worst and he offended the Chinese when he lectured them on human rights.
    surfer
    13th Sep 2013
    9:07am
    Poor old Masturbate, Nothing to do and all day to do it in.
    Aloysius
    9th Sep 2013
    11:32pm
    I understand that Kevin 07 went to church and complained that his prayers weren't answered. He was advised to console himself with the knowledge that the prayers of millions were answered.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    12:11am
    He looked happy enough to me. Quite relieved it seemed, to be shed of those same millions, who swapped intelligence for a Murdoch Newspaper!
    surfer
    13th Sep 2013
    9:05am
    Masturbate still obsessed with Murdoch.

    10th Sep 2013
    4:30am
    I was hoping to make a couple of comments on here without Mussitate & Co noticing. No such luck. 17 posts in a matter of hours & that is before Aqua & Jaguar join in. Congratulations. I will leave the site to the victors.
    surfer
    13th Sep 2013
    9:04am
    Good for you. I have been inundated with rubbish from Must-you-rate and jaguar to. A couple of labor stooges.
    FEDUP
    10th Sep 2013
    5:30am
    Just like you get what you pay for; so it is with Government.
    The giants have had their say, now it is for the monkeys to start to chatter about what went wrong.
    At least we will not have to do this again; unless there is a Double Dissolution; then back to the polls we will go. Albeit minus KRUDD.
    Pass the Ductape
    10th Sep 2013
    6:40am
    I hope Abbott doesn't muck around if there has to be a double dissolution. Lets get on with it so that someone at least can begin governing the country for the better, instead of all this constant bickering between the parties.
    dougie
    10th Sep 2013
    7:23am
    Imagine if as the labor Party membership seems to want Bill Shorten as Leader. He was the one who swore total loyalty to Ms Gillard and then with the promise of some reward rejected his loyalty and went over to Mr Rudd. This just shows how bad his judgement of character is and how little respect he has for his pledge of loyalty. Still if he is elected look forward to more years of insincere Labor loyalty pledges nd more knives being sharpened and inserted by others who have the same sense of honour and loyalty to their chosen leader.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    7:39am
    He was also the one whose comments on supporting what Julia gilard said even though she had said nothing and went this was pointed out by David Spear said he still supported her comments . This went Viral around the world he is not the sharpest knife in the toolshed.
    Plus he was living with Nicole Roxon and working in the same legal office during the Gillard / Wilson rort. Roxon took on the file from Slater and Gordon and guess what it has disappeared .
    Young Simmo
    10th Sep 2013
    9:34am
    Bill Shorten is a good little boy, he does what his Mummy in law tells him to do.
    surfer
    13th Sep 2013
    9:14am
    He seems to have a swollen head. Too big for his body. Weird
    sensible senior
    13th Sep 2013
    3:54pm
    my thoughts are he made a deal with kevin rudd before the vote for rudd went through, otherwise why would rudd sit on the bench when he could get his pretty face and more money as the opposition leader, so i think he made a deal with shorten

    10th Sep 2013
    8:36am
    aquatrek

    9th Sep 2013
    5:31pm
    Posted aquatrek
    https://www.taxpayers.org.au/likely-senate-results-victory-for-taxpayers/

    will this perception give the NLP a clear run ?
    aquatrek
    10th Sep 2013
    8:39am
    from the link in the above post:

    "As the results are being finalised for the 2013 Federal Election one thing is abundantly clear: Australians have rejected the big government tax-and-spend ideology of Labor and the Greens.

    Tony Abbott ran on a campaign platform of cutting high taxes and cutting waste - and we will be holding him to this!

    But the real good news for taxpayers is what happened in the Federal Senate.

    A lot of misinformation has been spread by the ABC and Fairfax. Ignore it.

    The reality is - this has the potential to be one of the most pro-liberty Senates we have seen in history.

    Despite the multi-million dollar campaigns by far-left groups like GetUp, the Labor-Green majority has been broken.

    Better still - many of the minor party candidates who have come in their place are strong defenders of liberty - and just the people to ensure an Abbott government does the right thing.

    In particular, both Bob Day from Family First and David Leyonhjelm from the Liberal Democratic Party, who look likely to be elected in NSW and SA respectively, have a long-standing commitment to the ideas of economic liberty.

    While they may disagree on social issues, they both are rock-solid in their support for cutting taxes and axing the carbon tax, slashing red tape, and restoring our liberties. Before the election I said that their tax policies were the best of any political parties, and their election to the senate would be a great victory for taxpayers.

    Both Bob and David can be counted on to do the right thing and ensure Tony Abbott does the right thing about the economy, and them holding the balance of power is excellent news indeed.

    In addition, the Palmer United Party’s stated policy of reducing the income tax burden, and the Motoring Enthusiast Party’s stated policies of reducing tax, restoring individual freedoms, and opposing the nanny state, represent a further win for taxpayers, and we certainly hope their elected candidates honour this pledge.

    Most importantly - most of these gains came at the expense of the left. This is the best possible outcome we could have hoped for.

    The Australian people have clearly voted in favour of smaller government.

    Let's work together to make this vision a reality.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    10:10am
    Great stuff maybe real conservatives who want smaller govt and lower taxes whilst looking after the real needy, will finally have a voice .

    10th Sep 2013
    8:58am
    I see the racists in the Labor Party are real dirty at Warren Mundine voting Liberal for the first time.

    They have called him every foul thing they could think of...and this from a party supposedly against racism.

    10th Sep 2013
    9:07am
    Palmer: Well, the big story about preferences is in Tony Abbott's own seat, Warringah - our candidate was polling above the Labor Party and with Labor Party preferences we defeated him. And the Liberal Party went over, and with Labor Party preferences we defeated him. And the Liberal Party went over, and now Labor's preferencing directly to Abbott over us. The same thing was happening in the seat of Wentworthville where Malcolm Turnbull is, the Labor Party is now saving Malcolm Turnbull and saving Tony Abbott.

    Australian Electoral Commission, federal election 2013:

    Warringah: First preference. Tony Abbott, Liberal: 61 per cent. Brodie Stewart, Palmer United Party: 2 per cent.

    Wentworth: First preference. Malcolm Turnbull: 63 per cent. Marsha Foxman, PUP: 1 per cent.

    Channel Mulholland! Tim Blair, The Daily Telegraph, yesterday:
    Happy
    10th Sep 2013
    10:40am
    Would like to see the process and legislation change for electing these individuals as in NSW their was 110 candidates and was far to many to number from 1 -110, know some people select 1-10 and would like to see that as a viable legal option with all the other candidates not getting any votes from the voter whatsoever. Another system is were you vote 1 for a party or candidate and thats the only vote they get with no preferences, Dont support a two party prefered system in the lower house as it needs to be based on an individual basis.The voting system for the upper house needs to be streamlined and made easy.

    This stacking alliance must be stopped as we have seen some horrendous results happening their, new legislation needs to be introduced to close this loophole completely.

    Another mandatory piece of legislation that needs to be introduced is Mandatory Policy Disclosure Statements were these candidates/partys need to make very clear their thoughts and policies on certain issues before the election e.g. Repealing Carbon Tax and The Grotesque Paid Parental Leave Scheme and Static issues such as health and GST, in a mandatory policy statement on their websites, even if they say undecided or by party member conscious vote on an issue and then we the voters can make an informed decision whether they get our vote based on that information. A good example of this is the Sports Party in WA and the Motoring Enthusiast Party in VIC, nobody knows exactly what they stand for except for one single policy. Most of the voting public do not feel comfortable with these two party's coming to power in our senate without knowing their views.

    My views do not align with our new Prime Ministers that senators should respect the ruling party's policies in the Lower House as the Senate is elected to be the gate keepers and assess policy's as to whether they are good policy,fair and just on the Australian public.
    Wstaton
    10th Sep 2013
    11:28am
    Great, we are getting some sensible comment rather than the diatribes of some.
    I agree that our voting system needs to be looked at but at the same time needs to be fair and take into account the minority who may still have got a near allocation vote on first preference.

    It is obvious for the senate that all is needed is a single line one block for each party. The current one requires all the boxes to be ticked when it is obvious that people who do 1, 2, 3 etc for their preferred party and then have to do the same for all the other parties 88, 89, 90 etc. So what is the point? may has well have a single line much the same as the lower house voting. The total of votes for each party is added up and divided by the number required for a candidate then it is up to the appropriate party to assign each member.

    The only problem I see with this is that not all senate positions may be allocated. I suggest that any senate positions left over should then be assigned to parties that have the highest number of voters even if these do not reach the level require for a seat. This would then stop this silly rorting of preferences.

    I thing the allocation for a senate seat is around 14% so if parties get
    for example

    independent 10% Greens 9%, libs 7% lab 5% then the remaining seat(s) would go first to the independent, next if there is still a seat to assign to the greens etc.

    This certainly would sort out these minority parties with an insignificant total vote that are not really representative of the country or the state.

    This way there is no preferential voting except at the party level no preferences are allocated after the first assignment of senators but will still leave the opportunity for any independents to be allocated a seat as after all this example of 10% on first preferences is still a significant vote.

    10th Sep 2013
    11:02am
    LABOR'S failed election campaign rested partly on one of the most trite and stubborn fallacies of policy debate - that cutting government spending costs jobs and damages economic growth.

    Never mind that public spending is ultimately paid for by taking from businesses and families, or that bureaucracy is staffed by diverting workers from private employ.

    Kevin Rudd repeatedly tried to scare Australians with the spectre of "austere Tory cuts" under Tony Abbott, alluding to the Cameron government's strategy since being elected in 2010 to restore British finances, which had been

    torn to shreds by the global financial crisis and decades of feckless Keynesian deficit spending prior, to some semblance of order.

    In London yesterday, Chancellor of the Exchequer George Osborne slammed his big-spending critics in a speech to businessmen, pointing to the "rapid strengthening" of the British economy over the past six months.

    "Government spending cuts have continued as planned and yet growth has accelerated and many of the leading economic indicators show activity rising faster than at any time since the 1990s" he said.

    The British unemployment rate has been steadily falling this year, to 7.7 per cent, and employment is at a record high of more than 29 million, while economic growth, largely stagnant or negative since 2009, has registered at 0.6 per cent in the second quarter of this year, the same pace as Australia's.

    The Cameron government inherited a nation of creditors, not shopkeepers. It was saddled with a gargantuan public debt burden that had surged from 47 per cent of national income in 2007 to 100 per cent by 2011.

    Despite relentless criticism from big spenders including the British Labour Party, the IMF and former Nobel Prize winner Joseph Stiglitz, the British government deserves some credit for sticking to a program of fiscal consolidation that was heavily skewed towards spending cuts rather than tax increases, in contrast to European nations that have preferred to lift taxes.

    It would be good advice for Mr Abbott, facing a fiscal dilemma on a smaller scale.

    Speaking about the need in all advanced countries to rein in spending and reduce taxes, Mr Osborne told The Australian in June that "the public are not fools: they understand this is a very difficult economic environment and difficult choices need to be made and that must be true of Australians as much as the Brits".

    Serious studies show that, whatever the politics, spending cuts are a better way to revive economic activity and fix budget crises than tax hikes.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    11:03am
    Cut and paste from today's aussie
    aquatrek
    10th Sep 2013
    12:16pm
    The international massive debts put the whole worlds economies at enormous risk. Another major conflict, say Syria, and no country will be able to afford the overheads in running a military campaign. Not only will will Oz go under but all will. A fiscal armageddon. That is what the ALP couldnt care less about - the risk factor.
    dougie
    10th Sep 2013
    11:21am
    Congratulations Tony Abbott, you have been in Canberra two days and we have not had any large fiscal spending announcements to get in our good books. Keep it up, a tight but encompassing Prime Minister is what we need. Not an egotistical bundle of big spending, big giver to other nations just so you can look good on the world stage as did your predecessor.
    GH
    10th Sep 2013
    12:26pm
    Interesting Q&A last night. Young woman asked Libs if they had any economic reforms they were planning to announce. Embarrassed No. Cutting a tax is not economic reform in anybody's language. We are left to draw our own conclusions and watch to see how things unfold. A party is not obliged to embark on economic reforms, but when a newly elected party is being given a golden opportunity to move into a challenging future, it would be reassuring to know that it had an economic vision to match the challenges. Clive Palmer had no difficulty in announcing his economic reforms based on some fairly solid Keynesian economics which could actually work but are rigourously resisted because of the potential to upset the complexity and co-dependent infrastructure of the status quo.
    Wstaton
    10th Sep 2013
    1:54pm
    Right, I thought Palmers idea of not making businesses paying tax upfront 3 months in advance on estimated income thus releasing this money into the market was a good one.

    10th Sep 2013
    1:43pm
    THE Labor government was the gift that kept on giving to commentators. Frenetic, misguided, hopeless at implementation - the result was a surfeit of material for sceptical observers. This was a government seemingly obsessed with setting up new trendy but senseless agencies so there was always a steady stream of wacky reports on all manner of topics.

    It's been hard keeping up. We have had the Social Inclusion Board, the Workplace Gender Equality Agency, the Australian Workplace and Productivity Agency, the Climate Commission, the Climate Change Authority, the Australian Health Practitioners' Registration Agency, the Charities and Not-for-Profits Commission, the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority, the Tertiary Education Quality Standards Agency, the Australian Institute of Teaching and School Leadership, the Australian National Preventive Health Agency, the National eHealth Transition Authority, the COAG Reform Council and the list goes. (I could use up my entire word limit simply by listing all the new agencies.) It really makes you wonder how we ever got along without all this taxpayer-funded paraphernalia, these vanity projects. The answer is: perfectly well. And we will get along perfectly well without most of them in the future.

    What was it about the Labor government and the establishment of all these worthy-sounding but wasteful agencies? Some of these agencies were the result of the Labor government's unqualified belief in the virtue of national regulation and uniformity.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    1:44pm
    Judith stone today's Aus
    aquatrek
    10th Sep 2013
    2:17pm
    thats socialism running amuck for you - only infrastructure component was the NBN - devised on an inflight napkin as a 'policy' - not even budgeted for.
    Cant wait for the first session - a'snortin Shorten and whom ? at the opposition helm.
    Then there is the ongoing AWU investigation. Shorten, Roxon, Gillard and Wilson in bed together.
    toot2000
    10th Sep 2013
    1:47pm
    It wouldn't have mattered who the leader of the opposition was, they would have still won hands down. Tony Abbott didn't win the election, Labor lost it.
    Anonymous
    10th Sep 2013
    2:04pm
    Why did they loose it , again remember they lost in 2010
    aquatrek
    10th Sep 2013
    3:25pm
    someone in the political arena other than the coalition groups should offer Mussitate a propaganda speechwriters fully paid up position.
    Anonymous
    11th Sep 2013
    2:43pm
    nothing more tiresome than a rusted on, one eyed laborite
    Paddles
    10th Sep 2013
    7:04pm
    I've only just joined this thread as I have been busy celebrating the return to a rational, adult administration.

    Taking off a bit of the gloss is evidence that Mussitate seems to have neglected his mood stabilisation medication. Musso!, you really must take your drugs in the prescribed dosage if you are not to embarrass yourself and, possibly, offend others.
    Aloysius
    10th Sep 2013
    10:02pm
    Another Labor lie revealed by the Telegraph today:

    There has been a 60 per cent increase in the amount of ocean covered with ice compared to this time last year, they equivalent of almost a million square miles.

    In a rebound from 2012's record low an unbroken ice sheet more than half the size of Europe already stretches from the Canadian islands to Russia's northern shores, days before the annual re-freeze is even set to begin.

    The Northwest Passage from the Atlantic to the Pacific has remained blocked by pack-ice all year, forcing some ships to change their routes.

    A leaked report to the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) seen by the Mail on Sunday, has led some scientists to claim that the world is heading for a period of cooling that will not end until the middle of this century.

    If correct, it would contradict computer forecasts of imminent catastrophic warming. The news comes several years after the BBC predicted that the arctic would be ice-free by 2013.
    aquatrek
    11th Sep 2013
    9:22am
    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/environment/climatechange/10294082/Global-warming-No-actually-were-cooling-claim-scientists.html

    thats at least two departmental climate sections that can be closed plus repeal the carbon tax farce - and so the savings begin

    11th Sep 2013
    12:29pm
    Please Kevvie, don't resign I want you there FOREVER!!!! You are the best asset the Libs ever had.
    Anonymous
    11th Sep 2013
    1:11pm
    Not sure about that it would be a close race between him and the Gillard/Roxon/shorten AWU corruption and cover up that will keep giving.

    11th Sep 2013
    2:42pm
    Yes, Pete I am following that with great interest. Police involved now and has had a court hearing.
    sensible senior
    12th Sep 2013
    11:00am
    well i am so glad the election is over but i am dissapointed katter got back in he got a hell of a scare though and maybe its not finished yet. i do not think that the labor party has learned they are still fighting amongst themselves and to put shorten in as leader would be a mistake i believe they should start afresh with a new front bench surely they have got some talent in the people that have been elected. i believe that this senate will be good for tony abbott and we will not need to go to another election we are already seeing good things happen in australia and i hope this keeps up. i believe we should unite for the welfare of the country and not this crap he said she said or does but go forward and it would be good if this was the case on this site, as a good discussion and good ideas is a much better way then degrading people.
    Anonymous
    12th Sep 2013
    11:09am
    Yeah let the good times roll again. All ready great signs of consumer and business confidence return .
    But the law must takes its course with the corruption that has taken place .
    Wstaton
    12th Sep 2013
    11:21am
    Yes it would appear that the infighting has started again. The caucus want everything their way but the 50% Caucus vote + 50% membership vote don't. I prefer the latter as it's a bit like the senate making sure that one part forcing things through.
    Anonymous
    12th Sep 2013
    3:12pm
    Well it has always been the Westminster system that the voters vote in the members of Parliment and they elect their leader . The number of party members is very small compared to the number of voters that parties attract.
    toot2000
    12th Sep 2013
    8:48pm
    I don't like the perceived class distinction between the Libs and Labor. Only around 20 per cent of people belong to a union these days yet the Labor Party is still bogged down with union people who have never worked in the real world - and they are about to put Paul Howes in Bob Carr's Senate job if and when he walks. Clinging to the old values of the downtrodden working class man versus the rich boss is now old hat, there are plenty of young tradies out there doing well working for themselves, employing a handful of people. They could hardly be accused of being the big bad rich boss. Time for Labor to attract altruistic young people from outside the union, with a genuine desire to serve.
    MiningMagnet
    13th Sep 2013
    12:52am
    The measure of the humanity, sophistication and civilisation of a society is its capacity to embrace and understand eccentricity
    I love the fact that preferential voting allows us to identify (statistically) the people we dislike least and transform them into a government
    First past the post is a simple system for simpletons who choose to ignore the mortal weakness of that system - in a group of 5 candidates you could get elected even though 79% of the electorate does not want any part of you.
    The preferential system allows us to allocate votes based on increasing distaste.
    Any relief (comedic or otherwise) offered to the serial ineptitude and marketing of the two major parties that falls out of this process is exceedingly welcome and very telling of the public view of the candidates on offer...or the mood of the electorate, just ask Sophie Mirabella
    Notes on the post-election orgiastic revelry - I was impressed to learn that the Dow Jones going up a couple of points and that any change upward in aussie market conditions was due to Libs success. Apparently China's economic turnaround is also a result of the election result....hahahahaha....I love this
    Curiously though the unemployment figures going up is due to the previous government ....hahahahaha....talk about selective argument
    Democracy was designed to give society a voice...all elements of society. Anyone who has not encountered the occasional lunatic or three on a regular basis needs to get out more. So it should be no surprise that we will elect lunatics...history records we have our fair share in the major parties so it seems reasonable to allow the rest of the populace a shot as well.
    The fact that it makes governing the country difficult is a good thing, it's not meant to be an easy gig ....they should earn the right to do it and then work hard to do it.
    The Libs bleating that the Murdoch press had nothing to do with the outcome is just politically correct horse-feathers, designed to conceal the scale of perfidy undertaken by our elected performers
    Advertising works - advertising is how the media makes money and they are very, very good at it - just ask any commodity - David Beckham, toothpaste, laundry powder etc
    So it is no surprise that a 3 year, orchestrated campaign to remove a govt is effective.
    Next time you are about to bleat the old line .." the Australian people are too smart to fall for media influence"...think how silly it sounds in the face of a highly successful and deeply researched advertising industry and you may understand how easily the rest of your opinions can be dismissed when based on this type of spurious reasoning
    Intellectual and personal integrity now demands that all the suspicion and scepticism applied to the previous govt continues to be applied to the incoming govt
    It will be interesting to see if the Libs oppositional pattern of 'just say no' regardless of the value of legislation to the country continues.
    It'll be difficult to find fault with successive oppositions behaving similarly - given the amount of acceptance of that oppositional behaviour in the past, but I'm hoping someone will show a bit of class
    I've always been an optimist....
    Country Pete
    15th Sep 2013
    5:07pm
    I am very happy with the Senate result. It will keep the bastards honest as the Democrats failed to do and are now in oblivion.

    15th Sep 2013
    5:57pm
    Rudd Gillard respected around the world. Am I dreaming I read that....ROFLMAO.
    The Australian voters could not wait to get rid of them! And they DID!!


    Join YOURLifeChoices, it’s free

    • Receive our daily enewsletter
    • Enter competitions
    • Comment on articles
    you might also be interested in...

    Retirement Planning

    When retirement planning becomes life planning it is a challenging, fun and fulfilling task.

    Age pension explained

    Anne explains whether you will qualify for an Age Pension and simplifies some of the more complex scenarios you may encounter dealing with Centrelink.

    Cruising

    Got the travel bug or need a break? Take a look at our latest Seniors travel discounts and deals.

    Meal Ideas

    Be inspired by our easy meal ideas. Search through hundreds of recipes to find the perfect one for any occasion.

    Trivia

    Have some fun and keep your mind active with our Daily Crossword, Trivia, Word Search and Sudoku Games.