Friday Flash Poll: Is your generation better than younger generations?

Do you think younger people have it easier than you did?

Friday Flash Poll: Is your generation better than younger generations?

“The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.” ~ Socrates (469–399 BC)

Ever since we could talk (and probably before), older generations have seemingly had it in for younger generations. For better or for worse, both generations have their stereotypes. Older people often view younger people as rude, ignorant, selfish and lacking social graces, while just as often younger people tar their elders with the same brush.

You probably remember your parents telling you how life was tougher, how easy you have it now and even how much it cost to buy dinner and a movie ‘back in their day’. There’s no denying that older generations often slated younger generations and vice versa.

The media may take part of the blame for how each generation sees the other. The media and, to a degree, the arts, prey on intergenerational stereotypes.

But are they stereotypes for a reason?

Today’s Flash Poll was inspired by YourLifeChoices member Dena, who recently contacted us with some content suggestions. Among her ideas for interesting articles, was a rant – for want of a better word – about a 22-year-old second-year university student who, on Facebook, tried to have a go at Dena’s thoughts on man-made climate change.

Dena was taken aback, as much at the attack as at the inadequate grammar displayed by the student. So, Dena took matters into her own hands and fired back.

NB: Dena’s comments are in brackets spelling mistakes have been left in

Fortunately for the likes of (for those who think similarly to) John X and I (should be ‘me’ you cannot say ‘for I’), the population of those living lives too privelaged (The word is privileged) to care or perhaps those who simply find it easier to deny (reject) such ideas in order to help them sleep at night, are (is) on the decline whilst the population of the scientific, evidence based argurment community (this expression means absolutely zilch and is silly) is on the rise (what are you talking about here????). The simple shift of the proportion of this perspective (you cannot have a proportion of a perspective) about the debate will contiune to benefit the likes of the generation who were (which was) always percieved (i before e EXCEPT after c) by the older generation as those who would "grow up and become scientists and solve all the problems of the mondern world." (This is garbage, dear lad as the scientists who preceded this modern generation did more for science and medicine than any of you kids have dreamed – witness vaccinations apart from anything else you now enjoy) This same generation who is out there now, (This current generation is better) taking strikes from school (taking school days off to protest is better English) and making speaches – (speeches is the correct spelling and they simply held up badly spelled placards) to the United Nations Committee (mostly Islamic nations please note), in a simple effort to have their voices heard as they try to break impact (this is not English – you probably mean “it impacts”) upon an issue which will certainly have more affect (effect is the word) on their own future than that of you or I (you probably mean ‘than on yours or mine’) . As this continues, the privelaged (privileged), (denying) population (do you mean a population in denial?) will become so small (perhaps similar to today's flat earth believers) that their non-science (unscientifically) based arguments will drift into the realm of mythology leaving the modern world simply amused by their creativity (and their verbosity about things which they really do not understand).

 

Was Dena right in firing back? We think she had a valid argument. Younger people may or may not be better educated, but this example surely lets down the entire generation.

Many, if not most, older people have great relationships with younger people. Just as often, younger people have great respect for older people. And yet there remains a gap that may never be closed. Is this due to stereotypes? Or is it just a fact of life – that the young and old are different and never the twain shall meet? Do we forget that we were young once? Do the young not realise that one day they’ll be old (if they’re lucky)?

We thought we’d ask you about the stereotypes placed on older and younger generations and ask you for your views on the intergenerational gap.

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Is your generation better than younger generations? Why? Do you think younger people have it easier than you did? Share your opinion in the comments below.





    COMMENTS

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    Paddington
    29th Mar 2019
    10:30am
    People are people. We don’t change much between generations. Upbringing influences how we act and how life treats you overall. Kindness and tolerance is important no matter the age.
    leonYLC
    29th Mar 2019
    11:26am
    :)
    TREBOR
    29th Mar 2019
    2:11pm
    Yup...
    MICK
    29th Mar 2019
    5:00pm
    Well said Paddington but I'd have to differ about not changing between generations as the current batch feel they are owed, generally have bad manners and go around shouting victim slogans for all sorts of groups who are trying it on.
    I have to admit I was surprised that the quote was from Socrates. Maybe it was a Greek immigrant arrived in Oz 20 years ago.....chuckle.
    TREBOR
    29th Mar 2019
    6:47pm
    Know that only too well, Mick.. Just slicing and dicing a rabid supporter of anything but Old White People (Men in particular) elsewhere... accuses me of supporting the massacre in Christchurch (posts prove otherwise) and of supporting White Supremacists.

    What I said was that supremacists of all kind - not just White - are not acceptable..

    They love to take up the cudgels without reason just because they can.

    Talk about rebels without a cause..... and just 'cause they can be....
    maxchugg
    29th Mar 2019
    10:53pm
    I generally find myself in general agreement with Mick on this one.

    When I married the first thing I did was purchase a block of land and lived in a dump of a house because it was cheap rent so I could pay off the block quickly.

    One day I was toiling away on my block when a former school friend pulled up in his new car, parked it behind my old bomb and asked what I was doing. When I told him I was digging foundations for a house he said "Better you than me, mate, I'm off to Hobart."

    Twenty-four years later I fulfilled a life's ambition and now owning my own home, visited London and part of Europe, then a few years later actually bought a new car.

    It seems to me that today the reverse process takes place. The young people seem to have travelled the world, driving new cars, some smoke, drink and have drug habits. I'm commenting, not criticising. I do think that owning your home is much more difficult now than when my wife and I were young, perhaps it now seems to be an impossible dream and they've given up.

    Also I tend to agree with Trebor, I don't like supremacists either, but these days generally white people are being regarded to accept their inferiority to other races. For example, the Aboriginal Provisional Government has had a statement on its site for several years which has never drawn any complaint: "Equality never was our aim. We are a status people whose rights go beyond equality." apg.org.au/resources/APG%201.pdf
    maxchugg
    29th Mar 2019
    10:53pm
    I generally find myself in general agreement with Mick on this one.

    When I married the first thing I did was purchase a block of land and lived in a dump of a house because it was cheap rent so I could pay off the block quickly.

    One day I was toiling away on my block when a former school friend pulled up in his new car, parked it behind my old bomb and asked what I was doing. When I told him I was digging foundations for a house he said "Better you than me, mate, I'm off to Hobart."

    Twenty-four years later I fulfilled a life's ambition and now owning my own home, visited London and part of Europe, then a few years later actually bought a new car.

    It seems to me that today the reverse process takes place. The young people seem to have travelled the world, driving new cars, some smoke, drink and have drug habits. I'm commenting, not criticising. I do think that owning your home is much more difficult now than when my wife and I were young, perhaps it now seems to be an impossible dream and they've given up.

    Also I tend to agree with Trebor, I don't like supremacists either, but these days generally white people are being regarded to accept their inferiority to other races. For example, the Aboriginal Provisional Government has had a statement on its site for several years which has never drawn any complaint: "Equality never was our aim. We are a status people whose rights go beyond equality." apg.org.au/resources/APG%201.pdf
    Colours
    29th Mar 2019
    10:41am
    Sitting at your computer like a school master correcting the spelling, grammar and syntax of a young person's post will win you no points. They post on their phones and in the few moments they have spare (if they are fortunate enough to find employment), so they do not have the luxury of dictionaries and thesauruses.

    When they point out that our generation has used the resources of the planet in a profligate manner and left them to clean up the mess, a lesson in English is not helpful. And denying climate change only cements their view that we are irretrievably out of touch and clueless.

    I like good spelling and grammar as much as anyone. But they are not going to save the biosphere from the bloody mess we have left as we shuffle off this mortal coil.
    Charlie
    29th Mar 2019
    11:35am
    Spell checkers are always american anyway, not English.

    At the height of the industrial revolution, who knew anything about the the green house effect and global warming? There is this assumption that it was always known about, but even in my generation I was over 40 yo before I heard of it.

    Now its expected to be fixed right away. because my generation caused it.?
    MICK
    29th Mar 2019
    5:00pm
    What's a dictionary?
    TREBOR
    29th Mar 2019
    6:47pm
    Someone named Shonery who is a d1ck....
    Captain
    30th Mar 2019
    10:42am
    Colours, I think that if you cannot easily understand what is written because of poor sentence construction, incoherent language usage and spelling that leads to misunderstanding what is written or meant, then it needs to be corrected. It would be easy for others reading the original comments to dismiss the writer as a complete and utter fool. Perhaps they should occasionally look at a dictionary. I am sure they could find an app that gives them access to dictionaries etc.

    As for time constraints, did our generation have too much time to gain an education that ensured we could read and string together coherent sentences?
    Hoohoo
    1st Apr 2019
    12:52pm
    Great Post, Colours.
    Can we understand what John X was saying? Yes.
    Was his expression, grammar & spelling terrible? Yes, & frightening that he is 22 & a 2nd Year Uni student.

    But it reminds me of a letter my high school English class was asked to to critique. The letter was written in the first half of last Century by a poor woman whose husband was away (at war, I think). My critique was very condescending, pointing out her poor spelling & grammar, lack of punctuation & lack of proper sentence construction. I received a very low score for my critique because the message in the letter conveyed very efficiently & effectively just how desperate this woman's situation had become, that her children had to go out in search of work (so they had enough income to pay the rent), how much she needed her husband & how much she loved & missed him (even though she didn't spell it out). The words she had used were simple yet very powerful. Her message was superbly expressed.

    The lesson I learned that day was that education does not give one a monopoly on superior expression. Dena is wasting her time by correcting John X's poor grammar, spelling & expression. Dena could have at least made some arguments about why she's a climate-denier (as many people do on this site, backed by scientific data sourced from a tiny fraction of climate scientists).

    Young people face problems that some older people have no appreciation of. While older generations are in denial, they don't want to admit they are responsible for some of the problems newer generations are facing. That said, older people aren't individually responsible for what their generation has done, but they need to see themselves as part of the whole community. Young people need to learn about what older people had to endure, too.

    Stop this silly generation versus generation war - it serves none of us. It actually stops us from being better Australians & enjoying a better society.
    Thoughtful
    29th Mar 2019
    10:57am
    I feel for young parents. Even for the most basic house these days, two incomes are required. Child care then takes a sizeable portion. There is a lack of socializing with friends as we had ( due to technology? ). Children are missing out on parental interaction. These are the people who will shape our future - not the ones who have just given up on all responsibility. Too easy for the older generation to be judgemental. I ( like many other grandparents who can ) help out with my grandchildren one day per week. It leaves me exhausted. Modern life is not easy.
    Cowboy Jim
    29th Mar 2019
    11:24am
    Thoughtful - very well written.
    leonYLC
    29th Mar 2019
    11:28am
    Hear Hear!
    TREBOR
    29th Mar 2019
    2:12pm
    Yup...
    MICK
    29th Mar 2019
    5:04pm
    Not a bad post Thoughtful. Its wrong that both partners have to work and still cannot afford a house.
    Have watched the progression over the decades. First one bread winner. Then partners had to work as well. Next kids had to have jobs. Next will be pets? There's a disease out there that nobody is talking about and methinks it is capitalism working against average people. And yes.....we do expect a higher standard of living.
    Charlie
    29th Mar 2019
    11:19am
    Better? in what way. Better character? better workers? better at computers?

    There is still some amazingly skilled youth going thru and doing amazing things, but not enough of them..Worst inter-generational fault, being inconsiderate.

    You should be asking why the younger generation is so below average, not why the older generation thinks they are better.
    leonYLC
    29th Mar 2019
    11:29am
    Is the younger generation below average though? Compared to what average? Interested to read your thoughts ...
    Tom Tank
    29th Mar 2019
    12:12pm
    I have quite a lot of contact with the younger generation and frankly they are a reflection of the generation who are responsible for their upbringing. I am reflection of my upbringing by my parents.
    A major issue is that the younger generation are subjected to massive pressure from the media largely trying to sell things and this involves intensive marketing to create a demand for a particular product. We never had that when I was younger so our attitude to much of life is different as we are probably more sceptical of advertising campaigns such as found on TV, radio, print media and not forgetting Google and Facebook etc.
    This is just one example of our changing world and unfortunately as people age they tend to forget how their parents criticised their choice of music, clothes etc.
    People have not really changed much over the years I meet so many really nice intelligent young people as well as the poorly behaved so what is new as I also meet similar in the older generation.
    Tom Tank
    29th Mar 2019
    12:12pm
    I have quite a lot of contact with the younger generation and frankly they are a reflection of the generation who are responsible for their upbringing. I am reflection of my upbringing by my parents.
    A major issue is that the younger generation are subjected to massive pressure from the media largely trying to sell things and this involves intensive marketing to create a demand for a particular product. We never had that when I was younger so our attitude to much of life is different as we are probably more sceptical of advertising campaigns such as found on TV, radio, print media and not forgetting Google and Facebook etc.
    This is just one example of our changing world and unfortunately as people age they tend to forget how their parents criticised their choice of music, clothes etc.
    People have not really changed much over the years I meet so many really nice intelligent young people as well as the poorly behaved so what is new as I also meet similar in the older generation.
    Charlie
    29th Mar 2019
    1:13pm
    Well Leon I began by explaining that the word "better" on its own is a vague concept anyway.

    But lets just say, compared to the generations I have seen in my lifetime . There has been a downward spiral with focus on extreme leftist laissez faire views. homosexuality, youth crime, terrorism is more abundant with people more easily manipulated.

    I see things taken so far to the extreme and corrupted that most of the good in them is extinguished, (eg) Feminism, First peoples, Equality, Global Warming, Refugees, are Just a few. Its all part of the slack undisciplined approach to things that fails to see, you have to be familiar with the reasons for something existing, before you destroy it and replace it with something else.
    Hoohoo
    1st Apr 2019
    1:16pm
    Charlie, your comment above, "... extreme leftist laissez faire views" is an oxymoron.

    Left wing is on the opposite side to "laissez-faire" Capitalism. According to Wikipedia "laissez-faire" is an economic system in which transactions between private parties are free from government intervention such as regulation, privileges, tariffs and subsidies.
    gerry
    29th Mar 2019
    12:42pm
    my parents were upper working class but didn't own their own home until they were 50
    Lattes and smashed avocados will never get you there fast Youngsters think they can do that and backpack around the world too.
    Entitlement will bring society down
    TREBOR
    29th Mar 2019
    2:18pm
    Yum - lattes and smashed avocadoes.... wait until I move oceanside and have my own coffee and my own Avo tree.... they don't like salt in the soil....
    MICK
    29th Mar 2019
    5:06pm
    Gerry: priorities, hard work and sacrifice. That's where a lot of the current crop fail to measure up. What many do best is cry disadvantage, believe they are owed and hold the hand out demanding mum and dad make their lives meaningful. There's a reason the mum and dad bank is the fourth largest bank in the country.
    The Care Bear.
    31st Mar 2019
    3:47pm
    Mick, you could just as easily say that about a hell of a lot of Pensioners.
    gerry
    29th Mar 2019
    12:42pm
    my parents were upper working class but didn't own their own home until they were 50
    Lattes and smashed avocados will never get you there fast Youngsters think they can do that and backpack around the world too.
    Entitlement will bring society down
    Charlie
    29th Mar 2019
    12:43pm
    Regarding the survey there are a couple of characteristics that are not characteristic of a generation, they are characteristic of old age. For example. A generation is not Doddery.
    TREBOR
    29th Mar 2019
    2:11pm
    I'd say, given that there are some differences in 'morality' and such, that they're about the same as we oldies.

    On the one hand, some are not so good for reasons countless, but others are excellent.

    I'm happy to say that my son and daughter are better people than I was/am, and as their mother said, they got the best of both of us. Neither uses drugs or such, my son works all week, has two beers on a Friday night, and neither has any legal or other troubles. His lady is a teacher and well traveled and educated, as well as gorgeous.

    The daughter is in film-making and does very well intermittently - such is the nature of the game, and her man is an ex-Army guy and a straight arrow.

    What more could one person ask? No boasting at all - nah... NAH!!
    TREBOR
    29th Mar 2019
    2:20pm
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=afam2nIae4o

    The Who - The Kids Are Alright....
    JAID
    29th Mar 2019
    2:22pm
    The poll seems a worthwhile one and Socrates' quotation is a worthwhile note to pause on thanks Leon Just the same, I could not finish the poll as it didn't offer the alternative that no particular difference in strength may be seen in environmental or social consciousness It didn't address the possibility that difference generations may give different weight to different areas.

    Socrates chose to select behaviour and attitude with a timeless character. We have issues which can intervene and "fix" reactions in time. Homelessness, difficulty in obtaining work, the relatively recent ubiquity of social media, rapid recent medical advance, the difficulty of feeding an extremely rapidly growing world population and providing it with energy are some of those pressures which make our situation appear different. Ensuring that there is a good chance of continuing human existence and life for other species underpins many of those issues.

    Some generations may be tempted to think that others did not have this world view. They may suspect that the sense of broad and overwhelming calamity could not have been great. Ones world is however defined by their knowledge of it.

    I think emerging generations are doing well. I am tempted to carry some disdain for what seems the slavish following of media icons and the self-reporting of what seems like insignificant steps in their lives, even for the way we go about providing learning. The temptation would be wrong. Again these things are a function of the broader world view which successive generations have enabled.

    There may be legitimate complaints but I suspect that these are localised. They may indicate a need to alter specific regimes and approaches. A friend, a serious chef, as an example believes strongly that young people do not want to learn the "basics." He notes that they have no qualms telling him how to suck eggs. Essentially that they do not appear to be awed by his 40 years experience, if anything see it as an obstruction to their progress. It is probably pretty easy to see that my friend could value from an alternative approach after he manages to sort the wood from the chaff. It is also easy to appreciate that after a long and detailed experience many may not feel inclined.

    Overall, all the generations beyond my distant past one get a good pass from me. Yet in terms of issues their response has appeared different.
    Ayin
    29th Mar 2019
    2:24pm
    The getting of wisdom is largely earned from the mistakes that we made during our lives. The merits or otherwise of any given generation is highly illogical ( picture Ned Kelly's glee at being able to take money from a hole in the wall). If you were to ask a child today to walk 5 miles to school and back they would look at you as if you had totally lost the plot. The point being we made do with what we had and that framed each generations contributions to today's society.
    JAID
    29th Mar 2019
    2:41pm
    Not wrong Ayin, good that we have moved on from some constraints. My mother happily walked 4 miles to and from school every day until she was given a shining new bike halfway through school. If the creek was up she crossed on two ropes (one above the other.) Not an overly easy thing to do on ropes which both adults and small children had to be able to cross. We only had to walk a half mile and later about two sometimes. Good exercise and we found plenty to occupy ourselves with along the way. Our young son, grizzles if we invite him for a walk of any of those distances but enjoys all of them when the feeling that compulsion may be involved wears off.
    BElle
    29th Mar 2019
    2:27pm
    After all the work in producing technologies and progressive advances in various areas of life, it would be a sad day if the current younger generation did not benefit from all these achievements We should encourage forward thinking in younger generations. I am certain that some aspects of modern life are not seen as progressive, but each generation lives with their own experiences and with what is available at that time. On reflection many aspects of my life I would not wish upon the following generations. These were my experiences and not theirs. Their are times that I feel luck to have experienced. Who in my generation would regret living through the 60's and 70's. They cannot, and will not, be repeated. Each generation to their own.
    Aussie
    29th Mar 2019
    2:46pm
    I do believe that the younger gen. has a lot of pressures that we did not have so is a lot harder for them to survive the same way we did - There is no comparison between us and them ... yes we work hard but we got the jobs they do not have the jobs like we did .... remember this ..."You can change jobs for 10 years and you never get the same job again" that was told to me back on the late 60's and was true the Sydney morning herald (SMH) job section was about 1/2 inch or more thick with lots and lots of jobs .... look the SMH now

    For example:
    we did not have the social pressures they have today
    We did not have the technology imposed to them by organisations and world progress
    We have a lot more fresh food available to make us healthy
    We had a lot better peaceable life - No terrorism like this days
    We did not have the American life style pressures imposed to them and supported by our governments
    Our governments where more aware of our needs
    Our parents only have one job (Dad) and Mum stay at home looking after all of us with love
    we did not have hate for other cultures we try to embrace them as one of us
    We did not have the Centrelink Monster - we had employment offices that really help us to get a job
    and a lot more stuff .......

    So lets think why the new generation is the way it is now
    They lost all respect for themselves and others .. Why ?? because they have to look after themselves to ensure they can progress in life one way or another.

    They are obsessed about technology and games Why ?? because it is imposed by society and business that make a lot of money like Apple and a lot of Asian and American companies that make all type of very dangerous games (War games and others) and there is no sales control - Any kid can have a game and the parents are to busy working to make the day that do not have the time to check or review the games and the government does absolutely nothing. .... propaganda and sales power.

    The government allow them to obtain benefits without a proper control and/or support for employment to be able to support themselves.

    Drugs drugs a mayor problem that has no laws or to soft to punish the providers - A very hard law is required here but ???? nothing happens.

    What Centrelink do to help them ???? they just punish them rather that assist them to find jobs or improve their living

    and again many many more issues

    So just think about why they are as they are .... do not punish them ....help them to get better .... I am not religious at all I have 3 kits that work very hard and they just make the day .... they are professionals with degrees ???? so think for them and help

    As Paddington say on his posting people are people ... we do not change much ....yes mate you are correct ....
    KB
    29th Mar 2019
    2:46pm
    Much harder for younger to buy a house and get tertiary qualification for a job Each generation has different experiences bu equally young and older are both socially conscious
    KB
    29th Mar 2019
    2:46pm
    Much harder for younger to buy a house and get tertiary qualification for a job Each generation has different experiences bu equally young and older are both socially conscious

    29th Mar 2019
    4:20pm
    This little story says a lot:-

    A very self-important uni student took it upon himself to explain to a senior citizen sitting next to him why it was impossible for the older generation to understand his generation.

    "You grew up in a different world, actually almost a primitive one", he said in a voice loud enough for many nearby to hear. "We, the young people of today, grew up with television, jet planes, space travel, men walking on the moon, our spaceships have visited mars, we have nuclear energy, electric and hydrogen cars, computers with light-speed processing, and…" he paused to take another swig of beer…
    Which the senior citizen took advantage of to say, "You know, son, you're right. We didn't have those things when we were young… so we invented them. Now, you arrogant little fart, what are YOU doing for the next generation?"
    TREBOR
    29th Mar 2019
    6:51pm
    **applauds**
    Hoohoo
    2nd Apr 2019
    2:51pm
    This story DOES say a lot, Old Man (beyond the "gotcha" line at the end). BTW, I enjoy stories about smartarses geting their come-uppance, no matter how old or young they are.

    Did you or I invent any of this: "television, jet planes, space travel, men walking on the moon, our spaceships have visited mars, we have nuclear energy, electric and hydrogen cars, computers with light-speed processing"? No? So why do you think we can take credit for it?

    Personally, I think half those things are an utter waste of time & resources. We'd be better off without television, space travel, men walking on the moon, spaceships visiting Mars or nuclear energy.

    The thing is, young people don't know what they'll do for following generations BECAUSE THEY HAVEN'T BEEN INVENTED YET! Maybe their generation will be famous for what they DON"T do, not what they do.
    GeorgeM
    29th Mar 2019
    4:43pm
    Life is more complex now with far more choices and world-wide influences, at the same time with all (both parents) madly in a rat race.

    Can't compare different generations on such simplistic comparisons as in this survey. For example, our generation had both parents working, with no childcare or even help from grandparents (in many cases), and with mortgages going up to 19% (thanks, Keating, NO!). Add in Recessions.
    Challenges are different now - e.g. parents need to watch which way technology and social media is driving their kids, etc, etc.
    Jim
    29th Mar 2019
    5:12pm
    Many of the things mentioned in the article have little to do with The generational difference and more to do with the affluence of each generation, and in my humble opinion each generation has seen a difference in their affluence, most people’s lives have improved over time, educational opportunities have also increased, growing up I didn’t know a single person who was fortuanate to enable them to go to university, that alone doesn’t make the later generations any smarter than past generations, it only gives them a better opportunity to have a better career or at least to have more of a choice, some have taken full advantage, some haven’t, I was born in the 40’s and until 1953 we were still on rations, it’s not a complaint on my part, it’s a statement of fact, everyone I knew was in the same boat, some fared better than others, as for being better off, the younger generation are probably better off than my generation, but of course that’s a generalisation, but for instance, my wife and I bought our first new car when we were in our 50’s, I see many homes now with 3 or 4 cars in the driveways of multi storied homes, so are people better off today it would seem so. As for the younger generations, depending on which generation you look at there appears to be a steady increase in affluence, of course I can only relate to my own family with any accuracy, but my own children and grandchildren are certainly better off, as for other matters relating to generational difference, again I can only relate to my own family situation, my children and grandchildren have always acted respectfully towards others regardless of age, we couldn’t be more proud of them.

    29th Mar 2019
    5:25pm
    The ignorance of general knowledge exhibited by today's youth is absolutely breathtaking. They don't read books, preferring instead to play mindless video games.
    Booboo
    29th Mar 2019
    9:03pm
    I don't blame the younger generation I blame the government for taking away teachers abilities to reprimand and for taking parents right to discipline their own children. So the kids feel they can do and say what they like with no thought or respect for others feelings. Not fair for future generations.
    Farside
    29th Mar 2019
    9:54pm
    if the older people take issue with the younger generations and want to push blame to someone then it is as simple as looking in the mirror.

    Social change is intergenerational and happens slowly. Our generation shaped the world that our children and grandchildren grow up in and we taught them the behaviours and values they exhibit. If we did that badly then we need to go to history and understand what and who influenced our grandparents and parents and in turn how they influenced us.

    No easy answers on this topic however this problem has been with humanity for a while – Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap (Galatians VI)
    hyacinth
    29th Mar 2019
    11:41pm
    many young people today expect to have everything immediately and are not prepared to wait. Some do not seem to want to connect with older people and think that older people do not have any experience of life. Most likely this relates to modern technology . From personal experience in my own family the younger generation has little time for connecting - they are far too busy doing their own thing.....not like in my time when grandparents were shown much love and respect. I have even heard how a partner of one of my grandchildren has plans to contest my will of all things. So perhaps my views on the younger generation have somewhat become tainted. We were taught to work hard for what we wanted and never expected things to fall in our lap.
    Farside
    30th Mar 2019
    3:27pm
    the problems, if they are there, reflect the values and ethics that we passed onto our children and grandchildren and the environment we created to raise them in. To that extent our behaviours and actions reflect how our grandparents and parents shaped us to look after future generations. If we want to see a change then it starts with us and a conversation with the younger generations.
    hyacinth
    29th Mar 2019
    11:41pm
    many young people today expect to have everything immediately and are not prepared to wait. Some do not seem to want to connect with older people and think that older people do not have any experience of life. Most likely this relates to modern technology . From personal experience in my own family the younger generation has little time for connecting - they are far too busy doing their own thing.....not like in my time when grandparents were shown much love and respect. I have even heard how a partner of one of my grandchildren has plans to contest my will of all things. So perhaps my views on the younger generation have somewhat become tainted. We were taught to work hard for what we wanted and never expected things to fall in our lap.
    musicveg
    30th Mar 2019
    12:08am
    This is ridiculous, there are so many variants in each generation. Generalization is so bad, putting everyone into the same basket because of age is just plain silly. Don't like judging people by age or opportunities because that varies too.
    Hoohoo
    2nd Apr 2019
    2:57pm
    YAY musicveg. Why create an unnecessary generational war?
    Banjo
    30th Mar 2019
    10:19am
    “The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers.” ~ Socrates (469–399 BC)

    I have to point out this is not a quote by Socrates. It was crafted by a student, Kenneth John Freeman, for his Cambridge dissertation published in 1907.
    Banjo
    30th Mar 2019
    10:37am
    Every older generation thinks the younger generation is lacking in some way. Nothing new. I hear the old saying “respect your elders” thrown around a lot. Respect is a two way street, if the “elders” don’t respect the young, don’t complain when they don’t respect you.

    I’ve always held the notion that ill-mannered children, are likely to have been brought up by ill-mannered adults. The younger generation have a huge burden on their shoulders which the older did not. The world is a very different place and they have to try and fit in somehow. Personally, I feel most of them are doing a great job.

    I am surprised Dena “was taken aback at the inadequate grammar displayed by the student.” When you see how poorly some of the older folk perform when it comes to grammar, and do not even offer an apology for mistakes, what example do they show to the younger generation?
    Hoohoo
    2nd Apr 2019
    2:59pm
    All true, Banjo. Respect begets respect.
    Booboo
    30th Mar 2019
    12:34pm
    Listen to the song by 21 Pilots it's called Stressed Out. The society now is very different from years ago. So much pressure on our younger ones.
    john
    30th Mar 2019
    2:43pm
    Paddingtons got it right.
    But this day and age one glaring thing that shines out is the fact about lack of job security and housing they go together.
    Younger people seem to forget that if your young and free , you will be young and free forever, but you are not, those who think it'll be OK can come a cropper
    Those who really try, can sometimes, get what they want and get a home.

    Those who think she'll be right get old like everyone does, if you don't own a house or you had no long term security you are in trouble, for the future, but this is not a generational problem, people are people, this is a governmental problem controlling the turn over from people working to technology doing your job, and the loss of work, which basically can mean the loss of home buying ability which is a foundation to security. Its happening now!

    Unless you are very good at uni , you get a degree , and , in the level of professions that actually make money, like Dentists, Vets, Doctors, Lawyers , Accountants, financial bank types, Engineers , you know what I mean ?
    If you are blue collar now days, you are heading for a hard time in the future .
    Unfortunately governments of all persuasions do not seem to look seriously at full time employment, into the future 50 to 100 years.

    If unemployment is every where , those people will be living in a very very unstable and cruel world. We'll go back to the cave , if we don't make plans now!
    Hoohoo
    2nd Apr 2019
    3:08pm
    Good points, john. It is ridiculous to say there is low unemployment now, because "employed" means working maybe only one hour per week. It doesn't encompass underemployment at all.

    And then there's job security. Everything's changed & young people are copping the brunt of this. The baby boomer generation is the one who has driven this job insecurity, helped by globalism & capitalism. So now, young people are competing with workers in the 3rd World, something the older generation never had to face.

    Generations need to understand each other better, rather than blame each other - that's a total waste of time & energy.
    john
    30th Mar 2019
    2:46pm
    Basically reading all the comments , we are in real trouble hey?
    musicveg
    30th Mar 2019
    3:08pm
    Times are always changing and the young will have to adapt just like generations before. The problem is the Governments are not keeping up with the pace. Sure you can get some free Tafe in Victoria, but why is it not more of it? And will it guarantee work at the end? Why isn't the Government providing more low rent housing? Why are they not kicking out long term renters from public housing who no longer need the housing and put in those that do? It is a broken system and needs to be fixed.
    MD
    30th Mar 2019
    6:01pm
    Aren't we contemporaries of our particular time ? That said, older folk also enjoy the benefit of hindsight, which comparatively speaking, is severely limited in youth - then or now!
    The old adage - "You can't put a wise head on young shoulders" - may seem apt to this discussion, and yet, wisdom and experience certainly isn't a right or privilege restricted to older generations.
    Maybe it's just my rose tinted glasses, but nowadays I witness oldies regressing and trying to emulate youth - and vice versa... go figure.
    I cringe to witness oldies kidding themselves they've still got it and yet I hold sacrosanct a conviction that we should grow old gracefully. "There is a time, turn! turn! turn!" (apologies to The Byrds)
    Some might suggest that far too many youth today 'think they know it all', but that particular trait isn't confined by age constraint, young or old(er).

    30th Mar 2019
    7:40pm
    All I can say is a lot of commenters here must have had a very easy life compared to me! From my perspective, nothing is as hard for young folk as it was for my family - certainly not buying a house or getting an education. I had no hope of the latter, and buying a house was incredibly hard and then interest rates soared to 18%+ and keeping it was near on impossible. Keeping a job was an ongoing challenge and all the jobs my partner and I had were frustrating, unhealthy, unsafe and low paid until we finally started a small business late in life and did okay for a couple of years before it collapsed in the IT crash.

    Of course it's all a matter of what start you have in life and what opportunities you are presented with - and, naturally, your own get-up-and-go. No way were we giving up on owning a home. We built it ourselves, living in a shed for years with little children and working on it every night, weekend and holiday for 5 years. That was after buying an old 2-bedroom dump and renovating and selling at a profit. Today, it's really hard for young people because they want 4+ bedrooms, 2+ bath, 2+ living rooms, double-garage, landscaped gardens, 2 late model SUVs. Or they want to buy in the inner city. Go look at prices of 2 bedroom shacks in the bush and see if it's hard to buy a house! NOT. Geez, with the current interest rates, it's a picnic. Might struggle a bit if they go to uni, especially if they have difficulty finding work after graduating, but that's a consequence of this silly notion that everyone needs tertiary education.

    Ultimately, it's exactly as it's always been - very tough for some, moderately tough for some, very easy for some, and easy but not achieved by a bunch of useless whingers who want it all handed to them. Nothing any different from past generations. Unemployment has been much, much higher in the past. Houses have been expensive relative to wages and cheaper relative to incomes. Interest rates have been low (a long time before I needed to borrow!) and unbelievably high.

    If the young folk I know are an indication, the future is in very good hands. And none of them are whining. They are doing what we did - figuring out a way around the obstacles and showing some backbone.