The Coalition breaks key promises

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The first Federal Budget for the newly elected Abbott Government will not soon be forgotten by the media and voters alike, with several pre- and post-election promises in the areas of health, education, pensions, broadcasting, environment and indigenous affairs being broken.

Pensions
Despite assurances from the Coalition in September 2013 that no changes would be made to pensions, changes in Tuesday’s budget mean that, from 2017, the age and disability pensions will fall behind wages growth by being linked to inflation.

Education and health
In the lead up to the election, the Coalition confirmed that there would be no cuts to education, no cuts to health and Medicare Locals would not be scrapped. Tuesday’s budget saw $80 billion in cuts to health and education and all 61 Medicare Local stores to be shut down and replaced by local health networks.

Taxes
In March 2012, Tony Abbott said that no one’s personal tax would increase, but Tuesday’s budget saw a deficit levy imposed on people who earn incomes over $180,000.

Aid
In January of this year, the Coalition said that the $5 billion aid budget would grow each year in line with the Consumer Price Index. Tuesday’s budget revealed that foreign aid would be frozen, saving $7.6 billion over the next five years.

Environment
Post-election, the Coalition confirmed that The Australian Renewable Energy Agency would have $2.5 billion in funds to manage, but in Tuesday’s budget the agency was axed. Under its Direct Action policy, the Coalition was aiming to deliver one million additional solar homes or community centres by 2020, but the budget saw the scrapping of fund rebates for the installation of solar panels to fulfil this promise.

Indigenous affairs
The Coalition policy document detailed the party’s commitment to continuing the current level of funding on Closing the Gap activities. Over $500 million was cut from these activities in Tuesday’s budget through the consolidation of 150 programs.

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We won’t forget

With several measures announced and leaked to the public in the weeks leading up to this year’s budget, it’s fairly obvious that the Coalition was attempting to prepare the Australian public for the sucker punch it was about to deliver in Tuesday’s budget. I and many others were floored.

In delivering Tuesday’s budget, the Coalition broke several core promises which won them the federal leadership in September 2013. The next federal election is years away, so it is no surprise that the Coalition is pushing through such radical changes now, with the hope that its last two budgets can be more positive. What the Coalition doesn’t realise is that the voters of Australia don’t forget and certainly don’t forgive. In late January of this year, Opposition Leader Bill Shorten called our Prime Minister Tony Abbott a one-term PM. After Tuesday’s budget, short of a miracle, it is hard to see the PM being re-elected.

The Federal Budget is not the time or place to play politics, yet both sides have been taking the opportunity to strike at one another all week through TV, radio and online interviews and ads. To take Australia into the future, more consultation between all sitting members must take place to ensure a balanced view is represented.

The Coalition is playing a dangerous game. This is a government which swindled its way into power under false promises and assurances to the general public. With no checks and balances in our system to hold parties to account, we can only act on previous goodwill and the policies. I voted for the Coalition at the 2013 Federal Election and if I was given the chance to re-cast that vote right now, it would be given to a different party.

Did you vote for the Coalition at the last federal election? If you were given the chance right now, would you change your vote? Will the voters of Australia forget about Tuesday’s budget by the next election?

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Written by Drew

Starting out as a week of work experience in 2005 while studying his Bachelor of Business at Swinburne University, Drew has never left his post and has been with the company ever since, working on the websites digital needs. Drew has a passion for all things technology which is only rivalled for his love of all things sport (watching, not playing).
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190 Comments

Total Comments: 190
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    I would change my vote too right and so would all Australia no doubt WE DO NOT FORGET OR FORGIVE ”’Bye Bye ABBOTT,HOCKEY,CORMANN

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      All Australia would not change their vote so obviously you haven’t read enough reports from those who approve of the budget.

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    If we had a genuine head of state (President, Grand Poo Bah) instead of a rubber stamp, telling lies to get elected should be grounds for instant dismissal. The sheer hypocrisy of Abbott after the way he treated ‘Juliar’ is unbelievable. At least Gillard had the excuse of having to accommodate the greens in order to govern; Abbott has no excuse. The compulsory super scheme is obviously a rort; if it worked why would we have to put up the retirement age?

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      Hear,hear!

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      This shows how stupid Hockey and Abbott are.

      They would have still got flack but I recon a lot less if they had done the right thing.Remove all the rorts and subsidies from super, stop negative gearing, Review the subsidies for the big end of town etc.

      Now they are in it. You know what amazes me? They think they will get away with it. Not when all the states are up in arms mostly their compatriots Liberal state ministers. Get some sense Abbott, You really think people do not realize what you are trying to do with the GST.

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      Have you forgotten or just ignored that Julia’s big lie was purely for reasons of power. You can hardly accuse this Government of that, if the idiotic comments on this page are anything to go by.

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      Yes Sceptic, it is time some one tried to wake up these half thinkers who are either nodding off or they cannot grasp the real issues and why some things need to be done

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      “Juliar” was forced to modify her policy stance in order to mollify the Greens, in order to form a government; it was either that or call for a -very expensive, time consuming and highly irritating- re vote.
      Abbott wasn’t forced by any circumstances, apart from his desire to rule.
      245 million for chaplains in schools?
      If we are in such crisis, why do we need that?
      If he is such a Christian, why is he more interested in teaching Christianity than practicing it?
      Wouldn’t Jesus be more interested in maintaining our commitment to the world’s poor?
      Abbott says there’s a budget crisis, and that Labor has plunged us into debt. How much has been allocated to paying off debt, and how much is going into ideologically motivated new expenditures -like chaplains in schools?
      Abbott is a hypocrite and a liar, and worse, the worst kind of “Sunday Christian”.
      Jesus said ” It is easier for a camel to pass through the eye of a needle, than for a rich man to pass through the gates of Heaven”.
      I guess on $500k a year, Abbott needs to spend more time with his chaplains.

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      Well said, Pete and my thoughts exactly. I wonder what Jesus would say about Abbott’s treatment of asylum seekers in PNG, Nauru and those who’ll soon be sent to Cambodia.

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      We don’t need chaplains in schools, we need more school counsellors, mentors, teacher’s assistants for special needs classes. There are many pupils who can’t comprehend some subjects such as reading, spelling, maths. Some schools have a mixture of 2 grades in one room—sometimes 2 grades in another room the same two grades as in the first room. Speaking from my experience it can be difficult to concentrate on your work when the teacher is talking to the other grade students at the same time. A young relative of mine is in a combination of years 2 & 3. She was in grade 1 last year. She is being given all year 3 work and the teacher says she isn’t always prepared for that day’s lessons. She has basically skipped year 2. She is ahead in reading but not all subjects. Next year for her age etc. she would normally be in year 3. It will be interesting to see what year they put her in next year. If they put her in with other year 3 next year she will be bored and hate school because she will be doing the same work for another year. If she does go into Year even more pressure will be put on her and she is going to need extra help. I have seen the homework she is given. A lot of it is writing about the “subject” they have been given which they can do over a space of 4 nights. In my opinion some of it is really too hard for a 7 y.o. Basically it is comprehension beyond the pupils’ age. Spelling homework:- they call sight words and they simply write the same words every night for 4 nights. They hand in their homework on Friday mornings. Her spelling errors are very rarely corrected. One of her parents check her homework most nights and point out spelling errors so she can correct them. We need more funding in schools, not less.

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    Well, we do not forget, but it appears that some “do forget” how/why did we get into the mess that requires fixing before we descend the “Greek style slope”

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      Check OECD figures – the crisis is yet another lie. Yes our economy needs to be better managed but this is destruction. I’d believe them if the money was coming off the bottom line buts it’s not. It’s being put aside for later – probably to buy themselves back into government. I’d also believe it if the wealthy were being hurt as much as the poor.

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      What did Howard do? Left $90Billion surplus, but he also gave $70Billion in tax breaks causing a sudden slow burn by reducing the revenue received by the government. This was in order to try and win the next election. Unfortunately for him it didn’t work, even lost his own seat. Then the Labor government were faced with the global financial crises which for all their failings they got us through. If the revenue had stayed the same (about 26%) and not drop to about 24% Then they would have got through without the need to borrow. But they did get us through. Note that they also kept the trust and did not remove any of Howard’s pork barreling.

      Now Abbott expects us to trust anything he says with the leadup to the next election. I remember saying to my son when he was little. If anyone catches you out in a lie, do you think that person will ever believe you in the future.

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      Currently $12 billion a year interest. Where do you think it would be in four years time if the ALP had been elected at the last election?

      China got us through the GFC.

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      Exactly, why do I keep agreeing with you Sceptic all the other countries who got in a mess did not have the ability to dig a big hole and sell what comes out, and as a bonus into a rising market.
      Labor saving us from the GFC was a big Myth invented by Swan and didn’t they hand out the dough.
      I could have bought another TV with what he gave me, but I did not want to waste it, so I put it towards our next cruise.

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    I didn’t vote for them because I already knew they were heartless bastards. No real surprise to me in the budget – they’ve stuck the boot into the poor and vulnerable and looked after the ultra wealthy. They call themselves Christian but I think Jesus might have an issue with them. However what they do is NOT in my name. I expect the people I voted for to represent my views and not those of Abbott, Hockey and Cormann. I’d like to see Peter Hendy standing up for his electorate as it is going to be trashed by its vicinity to Canberra. I don’t think it’s the LNP but I do think they’ve been blinded by conmen as much as the public were.

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      @Ericjoan.There are more approvals of the budget than you would believe, the problem is, many negative people cannot see past their noses, but they whined about illegal boats every day, whined about Gillard stealing AWU money, whined about Thompson, whined about Rudd’s return, whined about mega-millions of dollars being sent overseas in ”’aid””, whinged when Labor conned their way back for another term with lies, lies, lies, lies about almost every promised policy.
      How many of the whingers took Rudd’s $900 handout, got a free set-top box, free insulation, adding to the already massive un-payable debt and Labor knew they would lose the last election because of the mess they made in order to whinge, moan and complain about every move the Libs make because Labor has always been useless at running a country, it needs well-educated, smart ministers, whereas Labor could only bungle through with un-educated union thugs behind the scenes.

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      @Ericjoan.There are more approvals of the budget than you would believe, the problem is, many negative people cannot see past their noses, but they whined about illegal boats every day, whined about Gillard stealing AWU money, whined about Thompson, whined about Rudd’s return, whined about mega-millions of dollars being sent overseas in ”’aid””, whinged when Labor conned their way back for another term with lies, lies, lies, lies about almost every promised policy.
      How many of the whingers took Rudd’s $900 handout, got a free set-top box, free insulation, adding to the already massive un-payable debt and Labor knew they would lose the last election because of the mess they made in order to whinge, moan and complain about every move the Libs make because Labor has always been useless at running a country, it needs well-educated, smart ministers, whereas Labor could only bungle through with un-educated union thugs behind the scenes.

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      Mak

      You’re pretty much on the money there.
      In the days ahead, you can expect Laborites and fellow travelers to keep on harping about Abbott “ripping out” 80 billion dollars from health and education.
      I doubt that they will mention that the 80 billion was a forward estimate of their own pathetic budget last year and, in practical terms, never existed. I am sure that they put that one up when it was beyond doubt that they would be voted out in the 2013 election.
      To a large degree, I think that the acceptance/rejection of the budget will rather closely follow an age demographic. People of my generation (and even the one following) raised their kids, struggled to build a (very) modest home and all with little or no Government assistance.
      Comparing those eras to the most recent one, the difference is staggering but, unfortunately, we now have two or three generations that have been cossetted by Governments of both political stripes and the necessary reversals will have them believe that they are hard done by.
      I will have no objection to Joe Hockey winding the clock back even further next year.

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      Paddles: Howard’s 90 billion legacy turned into 20 billion after he promised 70 billion of tax cuts hand outs etc and all Rudd did as Opposition leader at the time, was sit in Parliament writing notes and not participating in Q.T. All he kept saying to Howard about Howard’s promises was, I Can Do That Too. So, he won and ended up with 70 billion of Howard’s promises besides his own programs. Then circumstances changed as we all know world wide GFC. Stimulus helped Australians to keep their jobs. So Abbott made promises last year and said he would keep some of Labor’s policies if elected and now he has reneged.
      I would certainly have an objection to Joe Hockey winding the clock back even further next year … politicians of both major parties created the “age of entitlement” Hockey refers to, we didn’t. We voted for them and got conned as usual into thinking that what they were handing out to everyone in this nation had been fully costed and budgeted for. Isn’t that what Treasurers do, balance books. Now they have got themselves in a mess they decide to pounce on the most vulnerable of the community.
      Work out what a pensioner gets on the single age pension that doesn’t have much back-up cash through circumstances we don’t know of.
      He or she goes to the doctor and pays out $7 co-payment, then off to pathology and pays out another $7 and then for x-rays another $7 and maybe to a specialist another $7 dollars all needed for the one illness/disease. This results in $28 out of his/her fortnightly pension of $842.80 at 20 March 2014 ie approx. $21,900 annually.
      NOW take the same scenario with the person who earns a high income around say $180,000 and the $28 he/she pays to visit the doctor. There is no comparison as to who hurts the most. We all have to share Mr. Hockey says: However, some with less have to share more as a percentage of what they receive in pensions or salary or wages etc. Then you go forth to the petrol rises which in turn increases the things you purchase at supermarkets etc. or whatever else you buy as the providers always account to the consumer for their higher costs,
      Then we have the situation in 2017 of the pension losing its value by being calculated on inflation rather than the current method. SMH indicated a few days ago that age pensioners would be $1,500 to $2,000 poorer ongoing. Each six monthly pension increase would still be an increase but on a lower scale and than before but what would be increasing as it always does is the cost of living and the cost of services etc.
      If you have no objection to Joe Hockey winding the clock back even further next year then you are probably not in need of the age pension. You are probably going to say Its for the good of the country that we have these cut-backs etc. but as long as a politician is sitting at the top of the heap smoking his expensive cigar and reaping the benefits of all his perks etc. you can’t expect the age pensioner to feel any other way than he/she does today

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      Renny you’ve said it all, nothing to add!

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    If you “won’t forget” the calimed lies, then I hope you wont forget:
    1. The $476 Billion school splurge that fed Unions slush funds,2. The Insulation stuffup 3. The reversal of Thw Witch of Carbon taxes, 94 the payout of hospitals to the “independents: to get their vote 5. The sham attempt at supporting the anti-gambling campaig, making Tony Wiundsor the scapegoat when labor voters werre agains t it to get Senitor (Sth Australian() to vote for carbon tax. Yeah- I won’t forget the bankruptcy that this great country has been, when only the miners were paying their way- yet the commos wanted to tax them more. I will NEVER FORGET those crazy attempts to fool the public yet siphon off funds to their slush funds. I hope the Royal Commissions are continued to trace those funds and then I will be VERY HAPPY. But in the meantime I WON’T FORGET those RORTS>

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      Good to see I am not the only”right” thinking person that subscribes to this site.

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      but apparently you’re happy to forget that Aus was one of the very few countries to sail through the GFC and record continued growth, entirely thanks to the Labor party and despite the right trying to force us into the austerity that’s done so much for Italy, Ireland, Portugal…
      Don’t let ideology force you to forget everything.

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      These schools must have been gold plated if the program cost $476 Billion. I think you are taking lessons from Abbott and Co on how to inflate things.

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      And also don’t forget that Australia under Rudd’s guidance escaped massive misery that other countries copped during the GFC–by comparison our deficit is small and unemployment low. We are very prosperous compared to most other countries but I suspect we have a greedy/mean streak which makes us unable to appreciate how lucky we are and we just LOVE to complain. Well, you voted for a change of government and now you don’t like them either. Methinks most Australians just like to grumble.

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      Oars what about the IMF facts that the Howard Government was the highest spending govt. ever. Costello hated Howard mainly because of Howard’s splurge which created the “Age of Entitlement” Hockey speaks of now. Howard created the mess with middle class welfare and Rudd continued with the Howard policies. However, we did have a GFC nearly as bad as the Great Depression and Rudd receives many plaudits from overseas for his foresight in bringing this country through the GFC with people keeping their jobs etc. No government faced with a GFC and Howard’s 70 billion in tax cuts etc. which he promised to fulfil could do much better. Abbott/Hockey/Andrews/Pyne have turned feral.

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      Mitzy, “GFC nearly as bad as the great depression.” Clearly you know nothing about the great depression.

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      I’ve read quite a lot re the great depression and me referring to the fact we had a GFC etc. is about it affecting populations around the globe. Rudd shielded Australia from the GFC but other countries didn’t do so well for their peoples. You only have to look at the fact that Australia has a triple A credit rating from three different financial sources something never achieved by any other Australian government.

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      No country suffered anything like the great depression during the GFC. What do you honestly think would have happened to the AAA rating under a further 3 years of Rudd/Gillard/Milne?

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      You obviously haven’t been near a school recently. All three of my kids schools have magnificent teaching areas built by Labor under the Better Schools Program. The situation is the same at e ery school in the country. It was a magnificent investment in our kids and therefore the future of our nation.

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    Did the government win on promises or by default due to the rorting and vote buying (handouts) by Labour and the Greens?
    Drew, I am sure that you will not be impacted by the budget in the short term. Longer term you may even reap benefits. Unfortunately some old age pensioners may have to cut back on cigarettes, alcohol and visits to ‘the club’ to fund their visits to the doctor.
    I can handle some white lies from all politicians but not ‘snouts in the trough’ to line their own pockets or for self gratification.

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      Tezza, I’m an old age pensioner and I don’t drink or smoke or gamble. So how will I fund my visits to the doctor?

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      DREW: Agree with you entirely. I didn’t vote for this government and was at a loss to who to vote for as there wasn’t much quality to choose from. In the end I voted for my local member Dr. Kelly Eden Monaro and it was close enough for a recount and the Liberal candidate got in by a thin margin. He seems o.k. but once the election hype is over not many of them do you see or hear from again until a few months before the next election.

      TEZZA: I note you say “some” pensioners may have to cut back on cigarettes, alcohol and visits to the club because of this co-payment. It would be nice if this inference which appears not only by yourself here, but a lot of other posters time and time again could be given the axe. It puts a slur on all pensioners. I’m a pensioner who worked from 16 to 55 years. No superannuation until it became compulsory during the Keating years. At 55 I gave up work to look after my husband with MS. My superannuation pay-out was $8,000. We had savings from working hard but we were both not eligible for an age pension until 62.1/2 years of age. We plodded along for a few years using our savings but then applied for the disability and carer payments which we were granted. We had to fill in Centrelink medical forms and asset forms every two years, provide heaps of information to Centrelink etc. My husband had MS for 24 years. He never visited the doctor after being diagnosed and led a life o

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      Tezza, how very condescending. Hockey said something equally demeaning and disrespectful. Disgusting.

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      of healthy living and health supplements etc. We both didn’t smoke all of our lives and were social drinkers if we went out with friends, however my husband didn’t drink once diagnosed. Being the sole driver I have had one glass of red wine with a meal and water thereafter. I have no alcohol at home unless I have visitors. I don’t gamble either except on Melbourne Cup day when I bet $1 each way on a horse in the Melbourne Cup. I looked after my husband all that time without assistance and he spent two days in hospital (not quite 48 hours) when he died from a chest infection which developed into pneumonia and because of the MS and his weak condition he had no fighting power to combat it.
      I was lucky enough to have a savings account where I religiously put $100 a month from our pensions to assist with future funeral costs etc. This dipped by more than half the savings for the funeral and I got bereavement payment from the govt. as well. Since being a single aged pensioner it took quite some time to adapt/adjust from two pensions to one pension. I have an old car because I can’t afford to update it. Unfortunately it is a car that doesn’t like E10 and therefore I am forced to pay for the Unleaded 95 with is much more expensive. I have had no car for the past couple of weeks because it needed a new head gasket which unfortunately then still had leaks and a new head was ordered. Total cost to me $2,833.40. Living in a country town the petrol is around 10 cents a litre and sometimes more than the city prices.
      I am coping reasonably o.k. through sheer budgeting and management skills and I own my modest duplex home. If pensioners in a similar situation as myself have to pay out major expenses such as the one mentioned above re my car, we have no means of recouping that expense and it is just another step down the ladder of our savings. I’m fortunate that I have a cousin who is more like having a twin sister than a cousin and she has assured me that if ever I am in dire straights I can go and live with her and sell my home. As I have no dependents when I leave this earth, my will and proceeds of my estate will be going to her one and only Son. I hope I can keep going along in the healthy state I am in at present for many more years (I’m presently 73) and if so the $7 co-payment wont be a problem to me. However, I’m terribly disappointed in the Abbott/Hockey budget changing the way the aged pension will be calculated from 2017 onwards which results in lower increases to the pension as with the higher costs of petrol and health costs for many pensioners it will be difficult to keep abreast of rising costs. Fuel costs will be passed on in all the food outlets and supermarkets etc. If pensioners with no back-up funds are to survive in future years, it will be worrying for them to decide how to budget a reducing pension in rising costs.

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      So many are saying it is only the equivalent of 2 cups of coffee and now Hockey says 2 middies (whatever they are). I would just like to give you people are little brush with reality. This disabled pensioner hasn’t bought a cup of coffee since the GST was introduced. Don’t feel sorry for me because I spend all my energy volunteering for a charitable organisation for seniors where I make far more friends than you ever will in a coffee shop.

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      Thumbs up, Eclair!

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    It is unfortunate that the editorial approach of this organ is not balanced. For it has become apparent that the opinions expressed by the editorial personnel is to the left. To be a really balanced and effective contributor to public opinion both sides of a proposition must be ventilated.

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      Just as a note, I have never voted for any party apart from the Coalition, so it is a little harsh to suggest my opinions and view points are to the left. The simple fact is that the current Coalition government promised more than they could deliver and voter confidence (as reflected in the polls… just wait for the next one) has decreased in kind.

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      Well said Drew,

      People commenting about peoples alliance seem to think that everybody saying something is wrong automatically say they are for the opposite party.

      This is essetially wrong with party makeups where everyone has to toe the line for what the party cabinet says. It was pleasing to see that this was weaking some grumblings coming from liberal backbenchers.

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      Webmaster Drew

      I would venture to say that you are probably a minority in your work place and you are most certainly a minority figure in the wider field of journalism.
      If we were to confine that field to the Canberra press gallery, then you would be nothing short of a freak!

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    Ericjoan and Oars…you bleat about ‘forgetfulness’ your precious Liberal Government are guilty of the biggest lie of all time when Howard said ‘there’s no way a liberal Government would be part of a plan to introduce a GST…never ever….GUESS WHAT they did and this mob are reckless and animal cunning enough to force it up and in so doing can blame the States for it. It made me sick to watch Shrek deliver his and Kormann’s budget while behind him sat a smirking Bishop and a snickering Abbott…it’s all a bloody big con…wake up to yourself or give yourself an uppercut

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      Yes John Howard “did” say never ever but when he changed his mind he took the proposal for a GST to an election, quite unlike Prime Minister Gillard with the carbon tax. You will note that Prime Minister Abbot has flagged many changes that we will have an opportunity to endorse or reject at the next election.

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      Nobody wants to finish the sentence Gillard uttered, i.e. “There will be no carbon tax under a government I lead but I don’t rule out an emissions trading scheme in the future.
      Now we all know what happened. The election ended in a “tie”.
      We went through a couple of weeks of bartering by Abbott & Gillard with the Greens and Independents and Gillard won the battle of “negotiation” to form a government. Windsor and Oakeshot didn’t trust Abbott (and it looks as if they were right for a second time after all these broken promises). Windsor stood up in Question Time when Gillard was deposed and told everyone that Abbott would have promised them and Wilkie from Tasmania anything their hearts desired in order to become PM. Abbott promised Wilkie enormous funds for hospitals in Tasmania that he thought were completely erratic. And, what has happened now Abbott/Hockey have taken $80B. from the States for health services and Hockey today is indicating when asked isn’t this pushing the States with no alternative but to increase the GST, he says: “That’s entirely up to them”. What a caring persona this man purveys!!??

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      Gillard won a negotiation? Oh yes. “What do you want to support me?” “Okay, you can have it.” If you call that winning a negotiation then you have a very strange interpretation of it’s meaning.

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      Mitzy

      “And, what has happened now Abbott/Hockey have taken $80B. from the States for health services”
      I would refer you to my first post on this thread. The 80b was strictly “pie in the sky” and we will now never know how a Labor Govt would have justified not having the cash when it fell due.

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      Sceptic: I forgot to stay “Abbott lost the negotiations”! Tony Windsor also indicated in Q.T. that Abbott had walked into the negotiation meeting saying Windsor could have anything he wanted, he’d agree to anything except selling the seat out of his pants. Gillard negotiated with five independents and came out on top because she was able to get a consensus and Abbott has been stewing and seething under his skin because his negotiating skills failed him.

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    I voted liberal and am disappointed that the promise of no new taxes has been broken. After the furore of Gillard’s carbon tax broken promise I can’t believe they’ve done it-to me it seems dumb! A lot of money was wasted under Labor and there are too many that think they deserve a handout just because Centrelink exists or that they’ve paid taxes in the past. I’m prepared to wait and see what the results are in 12 to 18 months but must admit I’ve just about had enough of the rumblings and whinging from those who are only thinking about their own personal immediate welfare and not the country’s long term wellbeing.

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    I’ve never been silly enough to vote Liberal ,never believed their bullshit claptrap.

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One blood test could detect 50 forms of cancers if the trial of a liquid biopsy undertaken by the British...

COVID-19

The trends from 2020 that support a positive outlook in retirement

For most of us, the pandemic changed our lives in a big way. We were forced to dig deep and...

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