No consent needed for NBN

As the rollout of the National Broadband Network (NBN) continues, homeowners no longer have to consent to the Government-owned NBN Co entering their property to install the fibre-optic connections.

No consent needed for NBN

As the rollout of the National Broadband Network (NBN) continues, homeowners no longer have to consent to the Government-owned NBN Co entering their property to install the fibre-optic connections.  This is now possible due to a move from the cumbersome consent system to automatic installation, enabled under the Telecommunications Act.

South Morang in Melbourne north is one of the last areas to get installation driven by demand, where households are connected only if they register. Residents will still be able to opt out of the fibre connection, however, once the Telstra copper network is removed, they will have no fixed-line connection.

The consent system has been blamed for the slow take-up of installations, especially in areas where there are a large number of renters.

Read the full story at TheAge.com.au 

Opinion - Embrace the new… or simply accept that it’s happening

The rollout of the NBN continues to gather pace and the new powers granted to the NBN Co will allow installers to enter your property without first getting your consent.  Of course, homeowners will have the right to opt out of the installation, but this will be dependant on knowing when it will be happening in your area. You can check the rollout map on the NBN Co website to see when the installation is planned for your area.

I’m all for change if it really is for the better. Having a newly built home, we’re ready, willing and able to receive the NBN as and when it heads through our area. But some may not be so willing and do not fully understand the impact of not having the NBN installed. While the NBN Co will happily trot out those who have had a good experience and have benefited from the installation of the NBN, there will be others who do not have such a happy tale to tell.

Many older homeowners may not be comfortable allowing access to installers and by refusing to do so, they could find themselves without access to a landline down the track. Even in the name of progress, this hardly seems fair.

I found myself subject to a Government contractor ambush only yesterday, when two people turned up unannounced on my doorstep to install SMART PowerBoards on my televisions. Only because we had been having a discussion in our office did I know of the existence of this scheme and was able to ask the right questions. Despite the benefits of such simple devices, which basically cut down the use of power when your televisions are in standby mode, this was an intrusion and if I’m honest, the installers were quite pushy. I’m not sure the majority of householders, old or young, will understand fully what they are being given.

So, as individuals we need to take ownership of the need to be informed. It’s time to stop assuming that the NBN is a long way off and will have little or no affect on you until it arrives in your area. It’s time to get on the NBN website and find out when it’s coming to your area and what your rights and responsibilities are. The alternative is to just let it happen and deal with the consequences after the event.

Do you think contractors working for Government-backed projects should have the right to enter your property? Is it your responsibility to understand the full impact of such projects?





    COMMENTS

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    wscifers
    27th Sep 2012
    11:43am
    Aside from the usual concerns about agents of the government granted authority to enter our homes uninvited by ourselves, I would like to remind people of the likelihood that scam artists and sneak thieves will try to pass themselves off as being NBN installers with the predictable result making off with money and valuables. Be vigilant.
    Thank You MR Combet and Julia.
    Veedub
    27th Sep 2012
    12:07pm
    The vast majority are too apathetic to opt in, even if they want to, because they are "busy" or lazy or put it aside and forget about it or a myriad of other reasons. This will overcome that.
    They are entering your property - not your home! You are being given the opportunity to opt out if you do not want them entering your property so where is the problem?
    ozimarco
    28th Sep 2012
    8:26pm
    Exactly. 'Opt out' makes a lot more sense. With 'opt in' you'll get people complaining why they weren't connected when it was free and now they have to pay. They'll say "why weren't we told the full story when the rollout was happening" or something like that. Whether you have opt in or opt out, some people won't be happy, but, if you have a good think about it in the clear light of day, you'll soon realise that 'opt out' is the way to go.
    Gaellun
    27th Sep 2012
    12:57pm
    Having read the opinion above I find it inconceivable the naivette of the article writer.

    One, The NBN will be a great boon for this country and every household should be connected regardless. Whether people opt in to having it activated is anothing thing. And before you shout I am on a pension, not a lot of money and certainly not a techno dinosaur.
    My major issue I have here, is that the broadband speed in this area is woefull and I am lucky if I get a max speed of 900Kbs/s BUT wait for the NBN. Guess what my location is not on the schedule currently listed on the NBN website, which means we wont get it before 2015 and even then we probably wont get it before the end of the roll out finishes.

    TWO. They indicated they were subject to a Government contractor ambush on their door step. I have had a visit from these contracotrs and a couple of points need to be noted. 1. They won't turn up without an appointment as there schedules are hectic. Two. They are contracted by the state govt to provide advice. They were not selling anything and indeed they have a bag full of goodies in hand. They did not install any thing unless I asked them to, they were not selling any thing, certainly not pushy. SO ask your partner if they arranged the appointment.
    Debbie McTaggart
    27th Sep 2012
    9:29pm
    Good evening Gaellun, at no point in my article did I say that I did not think that the NBN was of benefit to the country, or indeed individuals. What I said was that people need to be more aware of the powers which Government contractors have, and what their rights are.

    I can also assure you that the people installing the SmartBoards did not have an appointment, and were going up and down the street trying to see who was available. At no point did I suggest they were selling anything. I did not indicate that I was subject to an Government contractor ambush, this is what happened. And for the record, it's wrong to assume that everyone has a partner who arranges things without their knowledge.
    evilmonk
    28th Sep 2012
    4:07pm
    Government Contractor Ambush without an appointment? Absolutely yes! My son and, in fact, an entire country town, had a self-proclaimed government contractor turn up only last week. He refused to show id, insisted on the fact that my son had to let him in immediately as he had a schedule and wouldn't accept the fact that as it was the end of the school day that my son had to collect his child from school. Apparently his child was expected to wait until the contractor's 'job' was done. He refused to let my son see the paperwork he was expected to sign, would only let him see the last page of a ten page document and only then if he would let a complete stranger into his house.
    Needless to say my son refused and walked off to collect his child from school with the contractor screaming at him that my son couldn't go because he had to keep on schedule.
    He was, quite literally, ambushing residents and demanding entry and was rude and ill-mannered and completely refused to show any id whatsoever. It was a small country town so by the time he got to the other end the word had been passed around and people were no longer answering their doors to him. Not a single appointment was made with anyone and he was swearing quite loudly at some of the residents for not answering their doors - even those who weren't They were starting to get freaked out and the local cop ended up escorting him out of town.
    If this is the way the scheme is going to be carried out, i'll go without thank you very much.
    aquatrek
    28th Sep 2012
    4:12pm
    50 Shades ........ of the pink batt fiasco - I cant wait
    Watto
    27th Sep 2012
    1:30pm
    Let me assure all ,that by the time the NBN gets to your house, the optic fibre technology will be old hat and ,again, more of our money wasted by this gillard "government".
    Wireless is advancing so quickly that land lines of any description will be replaced . Ask any young person what they use right now for emails,information and surfing the net .....they use their smart phone.....wireless . Both my sons do not even have a landline right now .
    But, whether we like it or not, conroy and his band of big spenders are forging ahead , albeit two years behind schedule !
    ozimarco
    27th Sep 2012
    1:47pm
    I thought the argument of fibre against wireless had been done to death but, apparently, not everyone has been following it. The consensus is that the two technologies complement each other. A fat fibre pipe will be needed into your home to cope with our virtual life of the future. Wireless will be what you use when you're out and about. Wireless will never be able to cope on its own and will have to be backed up by fibre.
    If you want to talk about wasting money, look at the Coalition's proposal to use FTTN. They want to spend billions on an inferior stopgap solution that will, within a few years, have to be upgraded to FTTH. Now that is a waste of money!
    aquatrek
    27th Sep 2012
    1:34pm
    They are not just 'entering your property' !! They are going to drill holes in walls and if you havent made decisions prior force you to make those decisions on the day. A complex installation may take up a whole day !! dib dib dob dob Be Prepared !!!

    http://www.nbnco.com.au/rollout/about-the-nbn/fibre-wireless-satellite.html

    Preparing for the NBN - fibre connections: download the .pdf brochure so that you can see what is involved. Then ask Drew to explain the issues hehehe
    Vaycee
    27th Sep 2012
    1:46pm
    Hmmm - I would love to see an overlay of Labor held seats on the NBN Co service availability map, or am I being facetious?
    ozimarco
    27th Sep 2012
    1:48pm
    You are!
    Millie
    27th Sep 2012
    1:48pm
    my smart power board has gone to the op shop, what a huge waste of money yet again!!

    why is there no disclosure on the cost/uselessness of this device?
    ozimarco
    27th Sep 2012
    1:54pm
    I am hugely in favour of the 'opt out' model. Install the NBN hardware on the outer wall of people's houses so they can connect to it when they're good and ready. It saves a lot of money in the long run. Regardless of whether they want a phone line, people are going to want to connect to the NBN when its advantages are understood better. Even if you don't need it today, you will in future.
    aquatrek
    27th Sep 2012
    2:04pm
    I just feel sorry for those who are aged and probably cant cope with the technospeak especially whether to 'comply' or not and at what cost - what if it is more than what is currently outlayed ? what if extra costs are required ? i.e. widows, disabled, olde houses, unit blocks like mine etc
    Vaycee
    27th Sep 2012
    2:00pm
    I tend to agree ozimarco, particularly if you think to the future and may or may not consider selling your property. However, I am also still sitting on the fence on the issue of the broader implications of using wireless or a combination of the technologies.
    Fizgig
    27th Sep 2012
    2:38pm
    Hi all, have checked up on this and those of us not in the immediate areas being connected will be contacted in a similar manner as the power companies do now.

    1. When they come to your area they will send a letter prior to arriving.
    2. The street will be worked on running cables (dependent on the work required, depends on if they dig up the nature strip or can us the current cable conduit).
    3. You will be given a time a day that they will be accessing the property - you will need to be in attendance to allow them into the house to complete the installation, or you will just get the termination box on the outside of the house - no different to a Telstra termination box or pit you currently have. If you are not home when they do this you will not be able to complete the interal works (and there will probably be costs involved if you want them to come back)

    If they are coming to your area soon, my suggestion would be to think about where you want the internal box - you have to supply a power point and there are actually three boxes to attach to the wall!

    This might be a case of better to plan for it, than caught out on the day!
    ozimarco
    27th Sep 2012
    2:48pm
    I imagine it would be a similar process to when they put the power underground in the town where we used to live. There was a fair bit of activity about the place and we were kept informed of what was going on in our street by letter drops. Some people seem to think that NBN contractors will barge into your home unannounced. I'm pretty sure it will be a slightly more sophisticated process than that.
    Good advice from Fizgig about having a think about where you'll want the internal boxes. If you can't decide, someone will have to decide for you and that may not be the optimal place. Unfortunately, I won't have to make that decision for some years to come as we are not even on the rollout list.
    aquatrek
    27th Sep 2012
    3:05pm
    see my post above - there is a schematic of what is involved on the brochure
    Nikolai
    27th Sep 2012
    4:49pm
    Interesting comments, my biggest objection is that once the system is complete we wll be back to the old day with only one company for telephone lines - and we all know what will happen to charges then. I live in rural Victoria and have no complaints about my briadban speed whatsoever. My Niece lives in rural NSW and has recently changed to NBN and has found it a BIG DISAPPOINTMENT. Also as one contributor suggest these schemes do lay themselve wide olpen for scams, a friend of mine in her eighties had a phone call from someone last week insisting they call around the next day to instal a set top box on behaklf of the Government, I spent a couple of hours researching on the internet and advised her to ring the Government dept in charge of digital tv who advised her the same as I did to ignore it and not answer her door particularly when they said the woud call at 7 p m. Memories of insulation bats!
    ozimarco
    27th Sep 2012
    4:58pm
    That is incorrect, Nikolai. There will be many companies for you to choose from with competitive plans. No customers will get their phone line or internet connection directly from NBNCo. The RSPs (retail service providers) will be the customers of NBNCo.
    You may be happy with your broadband speed at the moment but you have to think of the future needs of the nation. Technology is not standing still and we have to start planning now for our needs in ten years' time, otherwise we'll be hopelessly behind the rest of the developed world and miss out on many opportunities.
    Vaycee
    27th Sep 2012
    5:10pm
    If you have a Facebook account you can type in "National Broadband Network" - they have a page - very easy communication tool. And it answers my question regarding wireless or cable. Can't see why I didn't think about it but of course you still HAVE to have a cable connection for a wireless connection - think about it!!!!
    aquatrek
    28th Sep 2012
    1:03pm
    I tried the NBN / FB thing but nothing ?
    lasaboy
    27th Sep 2012
    5:52pm
    They come into my property without talking to me first and I will set the dogs on them, NBN cannot give me anything better than what I already have, their service will be more expensive than what I have so I want nothing to do with them, I have friends that have the same as I have and they opted out because to change would have cost them more money for less than what they already get
    ozimarco
    27th Sep 2012
    7:26pm
    You will get the opportunity to opt out if you wish so there is no need to be so aggressive. The installation on your outer wall is free of charge at the time of the rollout. It is then up to you whether you want to sign up for a service. If you don't take up the installation when it is offered and you change your mind later on, you will have to pay. So you'd better make sure you have all the facts (which, judging by your comments, you don't) before making the decision to opt out.
    aquatrek
    27th Sep 2012
    10:42pm
    Ozimarco: His main point is the cost factor - it was always going to be the main stumbling block and that is why there has never ever been accurate prior the event costings so that the public could make a rational informed decision. As lasaboy states - why would anyone pay more for something that they already get. Now one is forced to 'shop around' at the time of the respective locality rollout. When the copper gets ripped out what then ?
    ozimarco
    28th Sep 2012
    12:04am
    A lot of people these days pay for the phone plus internet. Once they are connected to the NBN, they will pay one fee for both. That fee will, in most cases, be less than what they pay now for both services combined. The only people who may be slightly worse off are those that have a home phone only and don't want internet.
    lasaboy
    28th Sep 2012
    12:33am
    Currently I get my phone for $23.50, internet with top speed and 280 gig a month for $50, another $14.95 gives me a VIoP Phone, the NBN can't even come close to that, nor can Telstra or Optus
    ozimarco
    28th Sep 2012
    1:11am
    Your total for phone and internet is $73.50 + VoIP. Once you have the NBN, you can make all your calls via VoIP. There is no obligation to have a phone line to be able to get internet. For $70, you can have 300GB per month at the fastest NBN speed (100/40Mbps). How is that more expensive than what you have now? http://www.exetel.com.au/residential-fibre-pricing-mainland.php
    Nikolai
    28th Sep 2012
    9:57am
    Dont know what country ozimarco is living in but obviously he isnt reading the papers as to what the real costs are going to be, who would trust anything being rolled out by the Gillard Government or believe anything they say, how readily people forget the insulation debacle. Your comments about 10 years down the track are the same old story from labour. Ask people in rural NSW who already6 have NBN whether it is any better or any cheaper and they wil laugh at you.
    ozimarco
    28th Sep 2012
    1:30pm
    I can only go by the prices that are currently being charged by ISPs already offering services to NBN-connected customers. They are comparable and often cheaper than what people pay for ADSL2 + phone line. You need to add these two together as both are being replaced by the NBN. These prices are readily available on the ISPs' websites.
    As for the NBN being better, this only applies to fibre connections (FTTH), which are being rolled out to 93% of the population. You cannot seriously tell me that a 100/40Mbps NBN connection is not better than an ADSL2+ connection, not only in regard to speed but also reliability. By the way, it is not the Gillard government that is rolling out the NBN, it is NBNCo, a highly professional organisation. It is unfortunate that this essential infrastructure for our future has become a political football.
    aquatrek
    28th Sep 2012
    1:42pm
    ozimarco: get a grip there lad - fibre to every single dwelling that it can get to is not an infrastructure 'essential' !! It is a huge outlay for a piece of delicate cable that requires highend techo equipment expertise to install/maintain. Many households dont want it or need it. Its like Everyone has to buy a 12 cylinder car !! while hybrid 2/4 cylinder cars become more available as technology advances. Within 10 years wireless devices/apps services will have just 'leapfroged' this white elephant.
    aquatrek
    28th Sep 2012
    1:56pm
    BUT somewhat selfishly with my being an IT guy the users who sign up [most likely like me] will enjoy what it can do [even though for me ADSL2+ is quite adequate].
    aquatrek
    28th Sep 2012
    1:58pm
    for FaceBook app use this link

    http://www.facebook.com/pages/NBN-National-Broadband-Network-Australia/203095173059827
    rosemaryjune
    30th Sep 2012
    9:16am
    Not all people leave their TVs on Standby Mode. In fact there has been warnings issued that they can overheat and catch fire.
    Re the NBN situation, I can understand them needing access to the "property" but not taking a short cut through the paddocks of a farm with crop on it - dry. It could easily have caught fire from the heat of their vehicle exhaust systems. They were given no warning that they were going to be in the area at all, so they literally "baled the up" with a rifle and told them to leave and to enter via the proper road - by appt so they would be a the house when they arrived.


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