Which eReader rules?

Environmentally friendly and technologically stunning, eReaders are most certainly gaining a foothold in the literature industry. We reviewed a variety of eReaders, so that you can find one which suits your needs and price range. Amazon Kindle Amazon has burst from the pack to become the manufacturers of the most affordable eReader on the market. It has two other eReaders available, the Kindle 3G and the Kindle DX, however, the most reasonably priced is the Kindle Wi-Fi, which we have reviewed today. The Kindle Wi-Fi has a six-inch screen and is designed to simulate reading from an average-sized paperback. A highlight, as is the case with all the reviewed eReaders, is the ‘linear’ way you read the single pages of the eBooks. This device stores up to 3500 eBooks, meaning you will rarely need to go to the library. There is a large amount of titles available for download at the online Kindle store. It has an amazing month-long battery life if wireless is switched off. Put simply, if you want value for money, at $139.99, the Kindle is for you. ...

Environmentally friendly and technologically stunning, eReaders are most certainly gaining a foothold in the literature industry. We reviewed a variety of eReaders, so that you can find one which suits your needs and price range.

Amazon Kindle

Amazon has burst from the pack to become the manufacturers of the most affordable eReader on the market. It has two other eReaders available, the Kindle 3G and the Kindle DX, however, the most reasonably priced is the Kindle Wi-Fi, which we have reviewed today.

The Kindle Wi-Fi has a six-inch screen and is designed to simulate reading from an average-sized paperback. A highlight, as is the case with all the reviewed eReaders, is the ‘linear’ way you read the single pages of the eBooks.

This device stores up to 3500 eBooks, meaning you will rarely need to go to the library. There is a large amount of titles available for download at the online Kindle store. It has an amazing month-long battery life if wireless is switched off. Put simply, if you want value for money, at $139.99, the Kindle is for you.

The Kindle Wi-Fi can be purchased online from www.amazon.com.

The Kobo Reader

The flagship eReader provided by Australia’s super book chain, Borders, competes with the Kindle 3 in both thrift and competence. However it has the distinct advantage of prospective buyers only needing to pop down to their local Borders to purchase one, rather than buying online which can prove to be either costly or confusing.

The Kobo eReader synchronises with the Borders online bookstore which like the Kindle, has an impressive selection. Furthermore, the Kobo also has the benefit of being able to sync to your laptop, Smartphone, home computer or any other tablet. This allows you to always be in control of your reading and never lose your place.

A huge tick for the Kobo is that it is pre-loaded with 100 free eBooks as a reward from Borders for purchasing. With impressive titles such as Pride and Prejudice, The Origin of Species, Through the Looking Glass and many other classics, you can begin your eReading journey almost immediately.

The eReader is lightweight, comfortable to hold and has 1GB of memory, meaning it can hold up to 1000 eBooks, although an SD card can increase this number to 4000. It has a very long battery life and only uses battery when turning a page, meaning you can leave it on between reads if you don’t feel like waiting for the eReader to power up when the kettle is boil.

Great value for money at $179.00

You can purchase a Kobo eReader here or at your local Borders bookshop.

Sony Touch Edition

The Sony Touch has almost every specification of the Kindle and Kobo, but with some slight features which make it a better model. Its glare-free screen makes it a joy to read off, even in direct sunlight, and its touch screen display allows you to turn pages just by swiping your finger. It has a built-in dictionary, a massive 2GB memory and even audio playback.

Now, when I say that the Sony Touch has almost every specification of the other eReaders, I included the ‘almost’, as there was, in my opinion, a glaring omission. This means that all eBooks will need to be downloaded via computer. Then, once synced with the home computer, a ‘drag and drop’ method must be used to transfer the eBook files. But, without Wi-Fi, the reader can handle a massive 10,000 page turns on a single charge.

Conclusion

It has been a tough battle for eReader sellers in Australia. Many Australians have been resistant to embrace a technology which is quite expensive and, after all, can be completed just as well by the humble, paperback. Furthermore, with so much demand at the top end of the market for Apples iPad (a product which of course can perform all the functions of an eReader, plus so much more), it leaves a very small group of Australians who are either resistant to the technology or cannot afford it.

But alas, as the prices slowly drop and the products work out the kinks, these three have emerged as both leaders in their field and leaders in value for money. At the top end of the price range is the Sony Touch, however, without Wi-Fi, it just isn’t worth the jump. In the middle we have the Kobo from Borders, with great value for money and a free 100 eBook gift, but the product does have some problems. All roads lead to Rome and all eBooks lead to the Kindle. The folk at Amazon have had three cracks at it and have struck gold on their third try, with a product which is perfect for eReading.