9th Jul 2018

Facial recognition to invade your privacy

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Facial recognition privacy concerns
Drew Patchell

As technology advances it seems the public's right to privacy is being further invaded. The latest invasion comes in the form of facial recognition. Amazon's ‘Rekognition’ software hit the market last year at an extremely affordable price and is being adopted worldwide.

The software has recently been successfully used by news agencies around the world to identify guests at the Royal wedding and is in regular use in the USA to identify members of Congress.

The advancement in facial recognition technology has been so fast that it has been introduced to the market without proper Government regulations in place.

"We should have a set of principles that developers like Amazon and others are encouraged, if not required, to use," said Human Rights Commissioner Edward Santow.



Increasing the accuracy of reporting by news agencies in situations where celebrities or politicians are expecting to be identified seems a logical and acceptable use of such technology. This technology could also be used to help security at football stadiums, amusement parks and shopping centres, to recognise lost children as well as to identify previously marked thieves and barred members of the community.

For all the positives this software provides, what is the effect of this on the privacy of the individuals in everyday life? The question you really need to ask is: would you be okay with CCTV vision from Flinders Street or Central Station identifying you against a database and recording your movements?


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COMMENTS

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Hillbillypete
9th Jul 2018
11:18am
NO!
MICK
9th Jul 2018
11:50am
This is the ongoing theft of privacy. One can see this playing out badly in time as governments of all persuasion in all countries use the software to monitor citizens....whilst claiming they are protecting them. This is already playing out here in Australia with 'terrorism' cited to justify the removal of individual privacy. At the helm.....the current government. As I keep lamenting: the dictatorship at work, one step at a time.
Knows-a-lot
9th Jul 2018
5:00pm
Read "Surveillance Society" by David Lyon. It's chilling.
Anonymous
9th Jul 2018
5:21pm
only someone who has something to hide will fear this technology.

rorters , thieves and rapists come to mind, and union officials of course
MICK
9th Jul 2018
6:09pm
The typical government spiel.
If anybody has something to hide you have Raphael. I'm sure you are a rorter......and who knows about the other accusations.
Put up or shut up!
Triss
9th Jul 2018
6:45pm
I don’t agree, Raphael. It will be too easy to use advanced technology for corrupt purposes. Too many power puppets in high places.
Anonymous
9th Jul 2018
6:58pm
Corrupt purposes ?
how ???

this sort of technology will be used to prevent identity theft, welfare fraud and catch criminals including terrorists

don't get fooled by Mick and his leftie nonsense
MICK
9th Jul 2018
9:13pm
Where's the rest of your cash for comment clan Raphael? At Liberal Party HQ planning the smear strategy for tomorrow?

I am willing to bet you all come in together repeating the gutter attacks on Shorten which we saw on 7 (not) News tonight. Disgraceful smear run by 7 News featuring ex Labor leader Mark Latham who I understand is now working for the Murdoch stable.

Tell me it is not so dear troll. Will see tomorrow!
Rosret
9th Jul 2018
2:22pm
I have a sticker over the camera on my laptop. I do not like the way the camera on my phone seems to flick over to selfie mode without me actually touching the screen. I assume its pocket touch.
MICK
9th Jul 2018
3:17pm
I have done this for years. Even Zuckerberg does the same.
MICK
9th Jul 2018
3:25pm
Pretty quiet here today. There must be something big brewing if the right wing trolls are not posting. A meeting to decide on what sort of lying spew is to be run tomorrow???
Nerk
9th Jul 2018
4:42pm
Well I hope you hold your breath till then.
Knows-a-lot
9th Jul 2018
5:01pm
If only the Rightards held theirs - indefinitely.
Denny
9th Jul 2018
3:38pm
You know - the next step after this is to have everyone fitted with a microchip like cats and dogs! Life is turning out like science fiction. As for modern technology, well it's getting far and away too complicated for us 'recycled teenagers'.
Knows-a-lot
9th Jul 2018
5:02pm
I agree, Denny. The apocalyptically inclined would say being fitted with a microchip (or tattooed with a bar-code) is "The Mark of the Beast".
Nerk
9th Jul 2018
4:41pm
To late, it is the intention of the government to get as much information on everyone in australia, they have our photographs on drivers licences as well as racial profiling, passport, bank camera atm activity. Recently transport dept in queensland asked me for phone number and email address why? they have never rung me in 45 yrs, I never give out personal info to government depts. A mobile phone is a personal tracking device and police ask for it, it can tell them who your friends etc, this is what the government is capable of and it already has started.
Knows-a-lot
9th Jul 2018
4:55pm
Big Brother is here.
musicveg
9th Jul 2018
8:41pm
I have nothing to hide but it still concerns me that the facial recognition may just get it wrong.
Adrianus
10th Jul 2018
8:59am
If you really do have nothing to hide , then why worry if facial recognition may just get it wrong?
OK, this technology did fail during the Boston Marathon bombing, because the suspect was in their data base, but that was due to no clear visibility. Once this technology develops a large data base, coupled with the installation of more cameras in more strategic locations, mistakes will be minimised.
We didn't drive cars initially because we were afraid they would scare the horses.
Eddy
9th Jul 2018
10:52pm
You allude to a 'right to privacy', from where does this 'right' come? As far as I am aware there is no general 'right to privacy". There are legislated 'privacy' provisions in certain situations (for instance tax legislation). As far as I can deduce we surrender our 'privacy' every time CCTV is used, either as a security measure or as a surveillance tool. Facial recognition is merely an extension of this surveillance.


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