• Animal Antics

    Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    4 February 2020 at 9:09 pm
    4 February 2020 at 9:09 pm

     

     creatures-alive: True Facts About Marsupials by zefrank1 | Süße ...

     

     Ancient black swans hunted to extinction, NZ's swans from ...

                                  

  • 20 Members · 3,444 Posts
  • PlanB

    Member
    18 July 2020 at 11:41 am
    18 July 2020 at 11:41 am

    just wondering Celia — did you get me mixed up with someone else re the message below???

    ——————————————————-

    Colic is very common in a lot of deep chested dogs Plan B. 

    Their chests are like pendulums, when they jump it can twist over and stop the food/air from coming through the body, [evacuate]  if not caught quickly the dog dies. That is why it is important not to feed a deep chested dog a good 30 or more after having a meal, or drinking water. 

    One of my standard poodles mother had colic but was saved by the vet, she was very ill for a long time.

    • Celia Thread Starter

      Member
      18 July 2020 at 5:01 pm
      18 July 2020 at 5:01 pm

      Hi Plan B!

      No!   one of your lovely photos of the horses suffered and died from Colic.

      That would be pretty impossible to treat such a large animal. Very sad.

      Striking' Suffolk Punch mare dies of colic leaving trust ...Suffolk Punch mare dies of colic …eadt.co.uk

    • PlanB

      Member
      18 July 2020 at 5:08 pm
      18 July 2020 at 5:08 pm

      Those horses are so magnificent so sad — horses can be difficult to treat —

      I have also read that when you have a tall/large Dog it is best to feed them from a higher place — maybe a few feet off the ground as it is not good for their heart having to bend to the ground to eat or drink

    • Celia Thread Starter

      Member
      18 July 2020 at 5:14 pm
      18 July 2020 at 5:14 pm

      Yes that is correct, but it is for the stomach issue, we used to feed our big standard up on a stand for that reason. They sell elevated dog feed dishes from about 20 years ago, I was looking around South Melbourne Markets back in those days for them, they had a good selection in those Markets for pet supplies.  Not feet off the ground but depending on the dog perhaps 40cm.

      Boxer dogs are another deep chested dog that it can affect, all the big deep chested dogs run the risk of colic.

      For instance:-

      Elevated Dog Bowl | Elevated dog bowls, Dog bowl stand, Diy dog stuffAre Elevated Dog Bowls any Good…? (Pros & Cons) | Daily Dog Stuff

       Can you imagine the issues with a Giraffe!

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    18 July 2020 at 5:49 pm
    18 July 2020 at 5:49 pm

    Adorable ‘Paddington Bear’ cubs play fight at Chester Zoo after becoming first Andean twins to be born in Britain 

    Adorable 'Paddington Bear' cubs play fight at Chester Zoo

    Emerging from their den for the first time, they promptly celebrated by cuffing each other around the ears in a lively play fight. The same breed as marmalade-loving Paddington, Michael Bond’s character from ‘darkest Peru’, inset, female Pacha and her brother Mateo are the first twin Andean bears born in Britain. They are seen left, bottom right and together top right with their mother Lima. They were born at Chester Zoo in January but only braved the outside to explore their new home on Thursday. Their eight-year-old mother Lima looked on as the siblings enjoyed their rough-and-tumble and raced around their enclosure at the zoo, which has just reopened after lockdown. There are fewer than 10,000 Andean, or spectacled, bears left in the wild.

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    19 July 2020 at 10:27 am
    19 July 2020 at 10:27 am

    Tricky dog quiz challenges you to name 15 unusual breeds from around the world – so, do YOU have what it takes to score full marks?

    The online challenge, from Playbuzz user Michael Rogers asks you to identify the breeds of the 15 dogs from around the world pictured in the images below.

    No I don’t!

    • PlanB

      Member
      19 July 2020 at 1:04 pm
      19 July 2020 at 1:04 pm

      I could ID about 4

    • RnR

      Member
      19 July 2020 at 1:45 pm
      19 July 2020 at 1:45 pm

      1. Japanese chin √

      2. Tibetan Terrier X
      3. Bergamasco Shepherd √
      4. Alaskan Malamute X
      5. American Eskimo Dog √
      6. Newfoundland √
      7. Alpine Dachsbracke √
      8. American Hairless Terrier √
      9. Australian Cattle Dog √
      10. Awzawahk √
      11. Shikoku √
      12. Russian Sin X
      13. American Water Spaniel √
      14. Gascon Saintongois X
      15. Bearded Collie √

      11/15 Went OK I think … guessed some of them.

    • Celia Thread Starter

      Member
      19 July 2020 at 2:02 pm
      19 July 2020 at 2:02 pm

      Yes I could do some but not 100% I had not even heard of the Gascon Saintongois.

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    19 July 2020 at 2:09 pm
    19 July 2020 at 2:09 pm

    Revealed: How a $3 pet brush from Kmart is the secret to cleaning your fluffy living room rugs 

       

    NEW A woman from New Zealand has shared how she cleaned the faux fur rugs around her house with ease using an unlikely budget product from Kmart.

    I had a big grin at this news item;  as I have mentioned I used to fully groom my two standard poodles and the Slicker I always used was ‘Doggy Man’.  I came across them in a Championship Show up in Scotland many years ago, we had just come across the show and it was a very hot day!  I actually got sunburnt which is a joke in the family. We didn’t expect to find the show.

    So I used to have the three sizes, they are comfortable for the dog and the groomer to use, when we returned to Oz I found them in Melbourne on the net.

    I used to use them for cleaning the mat that I stood my dogs on to groom and still do today with the cats! I don’t use them on the cats just the mats, any mats even the thick Indian woolen rug.  These are a lot more expensive than $3 but they last for a long time and I didn’t harm my dogs skin in the process either.

    DOGGYMAN

    The front right side of a white Standard Poodle dog laying across a blue carpeted step looking to the right. The dog has a brown nose and dark brown eyes.

  • PlanB

    Member
    18 July 2020 at 11:32 am
    18 July 2020 at 11:32 am

    What a beautiful creature

  • Suze

    Member
    19 July 2020 at 10:45 am
    19 July 2020 at 10:45 am

    The Paradise Tanager is a very pretty bird from South America.

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    18 July 2020 at 5:20 pm
    18 July 2020 at 5:20 pm

    Bongo - Description, Habitat, Image, Diet, and Interesting Facts

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    18 July 2020 at 5:23 pm
    18 July 2020 at 5:23 pm

    mountain bongo

    With just approximately 100 left in the wild in Kenya, the Mountain Bongo (Tragelaphus eurycerus isacci) is critically endangered, a species facing an extremely high risk of extinction.

    The largest of the forest antelopes (growing up to 900 lbs), the Mountain Bongo, is a spectacular sight: stocky with a beautiful red and chestnut glossy coat, narrow white stripes begin from the shoulders and continues to the hindquarters, often an off-white band runs between the mammals big eyes, a crest of hair runs the length of the spine, and a pair of spiraled horns extend towards the back.

    The graceful animal is shy and reclusive, and only lives in a few pockets of highland forests in Kenya – Mt. Kenya, the Aberdares, and Mau Forest.

    Why is the Mountain Bongo Endangered?

    According to Kenya Wildlife Service, the Mountain Bongo is the most threatened antelope species in Kenya and “possibly the most endangered large mammal south of the Sahara.”

    Population in the wild has plummeted in the past 50 years primarily due to unrestricted hunting, poaching, loss of habitat, illegal logging in forests and diseases with the rinderpest drastically reducing populations in the 1890s and early 1900s.

    Is the Mountain Bongo Doomed?

    With only approximately 100 Mountain Bongos left in the wild, the species is under greater threat than even the Black Rhino, which currently has a population of more than 5,000.

    61 Mountain Bongos are in captivity and participate in a breeding program. In 2004, 13 zoos and conservation organizations in the U.S. partnered with the Rare Species Conservatory Foundation, the United Nations Foundation and others in Kenya in an effort to begin repopulating the critically endangered antelope. Eighteen captive-bred bongos were flown to Mount Kenya Wildlife Conservancy, where they live and breed in a protected environment.

    According to Donald Bunge of Mount Kenya Game Ranch, a minimum of 250 breeding adults are required before the population of the Mountain Bongo can be considered healthy by scientists.

    “We’re currently proposing a 10kmsanctuary to Kenya Wildlife Service and Kenya Forest and if it’s accepted, with the current breeding success, we could replenish the Mountain Bongo population to 250 in 5 years.”

    Recent breeding success in Mountain Bongo conservation is inspiring, with 8 Mountain Bongos being born at Mount Kenya Wildlife Conservancy in 2015, but a lot of work remains to secure the population and ensure that it stays there.

    How You Can Help

    The proposed concession of up to 10 by 10km land in the forest is vital to the future progress  of the Mountain Bongo re-population program. It is estimated that the protective fence with cost KSh100 million.

    If you would like to get involved, here’s how.

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    18 July 2020 at 5:27 pm
    18 July 2020 at 5:27 pm

    Baby Bongo Born at Franklin Park Zoo - ZooBorns

20 Members · 3,444 Posts