The Meeting Place

Get paid $1000 to road test the new iPhone 11

WhistleOut, Australia’s phone and internet comparison site has a great opportunity for the right person to test and review the highly anticipated new iPhone 11, with a focus on testing out its camera. 

Announced at Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino this week, the new iPhone 11's camera was a focal point for the launch, with ultra-wide photos, night mode and slo-mo selfies (or ‘slofies’) among the camera features announced.

WhistleOut wants someone to road test the new iPhone 11’s camera and see how well it performs in practice, from the perspective of the everyday user.

Kenny McGilvary, spokesperson for WhistleOut commented: ‘Phone prices are at all-time highs so there are a number of things people should consider before purchasing a new device, and camera performance is one of the most influential factors for phone consumers today. That’s why we’re looking for someone to put the new iPhone 11's camera capabilities to the test for a dedicated review which will be published on WhistleOut, alongside WhistleOut’s full review of the handset. 

“We’re looking for someone who can try the camera out in all kinds of conditions and settings, and test out its new features so people get a clear idea of what it’s like in practice before they take the plunge and purchase one. The aim for the camera review is to provide a practical guide for everyday users about what the iPhone 11 camera experience is like, what it can do, and how to get the most out of it. 

“We’ll publish the review and images the successful applicant takes, and their review will help identify tips, tricks and any surprises people should be aware of. This is a dream gig for any phone or photography enthusiast.”

Key details:

  • People can find out more details and submit their application at: https://www.whistleout.com.au/MobilePhones/News/iphone11-gig 
  • Applications are open until 20th September
  • The successful applicant will be paid $1000 and will keep the iPhone 11 handset once the test and iPhone camera review is completed.

6 comments

 

It is high time Apple stopped languishing behind the other mobiles in the camera section ... but it sure is expensive

Instead of lashing out a huge amount of money for a mobile phone why not buy a phone that is only a phone and buy one of the new generation of small cameras. The combination is cheaper with better photographs and you cannot be tracked through your phone.

Instead of lashing out a huge amount of money for a mobile phone why not buy a phone that is only a phone and buy one of the new generation of small cameras. The combination is cheaper with better photographs and you cannot be tracked through your phone.

Never mind someone testing your I Phone, how about setting up some training facilities for older citizens like myself to learn how to use the things. 

I have come right through with computing and PCs from the early 80s with the start of the text-editing typewriters etc. Did my training on the mainframe at TAFE and got the job of looking after the first computer classroom at the college. I subsequently wrote the first Australian Word Processing testbook - generic - where students wrote the instructions down the right side in a column beside the exercise to be done. Then, because it was thought that students needed to'have a knowledge of computing' we had theory classes and another of my textbooks was adopted as the required text for that course.

Despite all this experience, when I inherited a second-hand I Phone from my son  I didn't, and still don't know how to, use it properly. Now there's no question of using it at all as the charging mechanism inside it has broken down. I can dismantle a PC but I can't handle this pocket-sized computer. It didn't ring loud enough for a partially deaf person nor did it ring long enough for a person to lift their creaking bones out of a chair and stagger over to recover it from where it was hidden. You would sell a lot more phones if you instituted some kind of training and considered things for the elderly and disabled - free of course!!

Never mind someone testing your I Phone, how about setting up some training facilities for older citizens like myself to learn how to use the things. 

I have come right through with computing and PCs from the early 80s with the start of the text-editing typewriters etc. Did my training on the mainframe at TAFE and got the job of looking after the first computer classroom at the college. I subsequently wrote the first Australian Word Processing testbook - generic - where students wrote the instructions down the right side in a column beside the exercise to be done. Then, because it was thought that students needed to'have a knowledge of computing' we had theory classes and another of my textbooks was adopted as the required text for that course.

Despite all this experience, when I inherited a second-hand I Phone from my son  I didn't, and still don't know how to, use it properly. Now there's no question of using it at all as the charging mechanism inside it has broken down. I can dismantle a PC but I can't handle this pocket-sized computer. It didn't ring loud enough for a partially deaf person nor did it ring long enough for a person to lift their creaking bones out of a chair and stagger over to recover it from where it was hidden. You would sell a lot more phones if you instituted some kind of training and considered things for the elderly and disabled - free of course!!

@Teacher

Our Council provides courses as you mention  for Seniors through our Libraries.

Also there are community based clubs which you can join to help with computers.

You may like to check these out in your neighbourhood.

enrol at beconnected.esafety.gov.au

 

Sounds like an ideal gig for a tech savvy social media user, no doubt you will have to video yourself etc. Just checked it out, you need to be a bit of a photograhy expert and have an Instagram account proving how good you are at photography. You have a week to complete the assigment.

6 comments