The Meeting Place

Is the Duke of Edinburgh, too old to be driving?

On reading about the Duke of Edinburgh's recent accident, I was surprised to read that the lady in the other car, who sustained a broken wrist, when the Land Rover, (he was driving) hit her vehicle.

She said "I got a call from a police officer who said, "The Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh would like to be remembered to you".

"That's not even an apology or a get well wish", she said.

Maybe Royalty thinks it is  a trivial matter. Meanwhile he gets a new Land Rover delivered the next day and the poor victim is inconvenienced with a broken wrist for a few months. Gees Royalty are a pain in the butt. 

 

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I know many Australians who should not be driving or at least be retested. Should I report them or turn a blind eye and hope nobody gets injured or killed?

I know many Australians who should not be driving or at least be retested. Should I report them or turn a blind eye and hope nobody gets injured or killed?

Older people are constantly labouring under the negative stereotype of the doddering senile old fool suitable only for a park bench once they reach retirement age, or before as many employers including the federal and State governments have had it when the employers pushed so many out on redundancy as part of positive discrimination strategies to employ more women and multicultural. Employers and government in its policies have been able to discriminate against and ignore older people by virtue of that convenient negative stereotype.

Is there any age group that exhibits as much diversity in abilities, skills and expectations as older people?

Regarding the Duke's accident, unless his vehicle can be proved to have moved against a traffic sign or suddenly onto the carriageway and in the path of the other vehicle, the other driver is likely to also have contributory negligence for failing to drive to the conditions, maintain a sharp lookout and do everything possible to avoid an accident.  That means always being in the moment and mentally present and ensuring that proactive steps are taken to avoid hazards and likelihood of collision.  Of course, that includes the Duke's personal responsibility to ensure that he is only on the road if he can manage the responsibility.

 

I much prefer the international marine regulations that place far greater onus on all drivers (vessel captains) to do everything possible and proactively to avoid a collision.  For example, it would never be acceptable for a captain to ever take right of way without first being given it by the other skipper, or assume that others will get out of the way.

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