The Meeting Place

Retirement Living Code of Conduct

This is a media release from www.awisemove.com.au

The Retirement Living Code of Conduct, an industry initiative supported by the Retirement Living Council (RLC) and Leading Aged Services Australia (LASA), has today launched a new provisional registration stage, to support retirement communities that want to start the process of becoming Code compliant. 

With the Code already operating in over 550 villages nationwide and supporting more than 65,000 residents, Provisional Code of Conduct Registration is about supporting operators who are working toward Code compliance. 

This step allows retirement living operators to demonstrate that they agree to the principles laid out by the Code, while working with staff and residents to become full Code signatories. 

Ben Myers, Executive Director of the Retirement Living Council, has expressed his enthusiasm for what this next step foreshadows for the future of the Code. 

“This is a great step towards making the Code even more accessible and it will especially help to extend the benefits of the Code to residents in many smaller retirement communities,” he said.

“By giving retirement communities a provisional period to fully implement the Code and adjust to any changes that must be made, it is now easier to get on board with the Code and show a real focus on the wellbeing of residents.”

LASA CEO Sean Rooney said that giving operators a provisional registration period to implement the Code, meant residents could be given confidence that their community is making a step in the right direction.

“The biggest gain to be made from having a provisional registration period, is that residents in these communities can be assured that there is a commitment to implementing the Code and the ongoing provision of trustworthy and high-quality services,” he said.

“This is a wise move because the Code is focused on the best interests of residents and delivering reliability for older Australians to live fulfilling and secure lives.”

Provisional Code of Conduct Registration is available to Operators who are committed to the Vision for the Industry, Objectives, Values and Principles of the Code.

What do you think of this idea? 

8 comments

The code is simply a tool to divert the eyes of the legislator away from legislating. There are NO penalties for breaching the code.   A bit like the Victorian Retirement Village Act, plenty of words, plenty of written penalties, but no enforcement for a breach. A written law not enforced is no law at all.

I'm a bit dubious about the Retirement Living Council (a minion of the Property Council?) and the code of conduct.  Retirement Village residents are treated like kinfdergarten schoolers in many cases by the operators.

I'm a bit dubious about the Retirement Living Council (a minion of the Property Council?) and the code of conduct.  Retirement Village residents are treated like kinfdergarten schoolers in many cases by the operators.

Just spotted this on the Internet

"...The Retirement Living Code of Conduct is the initiative of two peak industry bodies representing retirement living operators across Australia - the Retirement Living Council (which is part of the Property Council of Australia) and Leading Age Services Australia (LASA)..."

Surprise!  Surprise!

 

Just spotted this on the Internet

"...The Retirement Living Code of Conduct is the initiative of two peak industry bodies representing retirement living operators across Australia - the Retirement Living Council (which is part of the Property Council of Australia) and Leading Age Services Australia (LASA)..."

Surprise!  Surprise!

 

Porobably not worth the paper it's printed on IMO.

So many industries produce their own so-called Codes of Conduct whilst many in those same industries continually rip people off without any effective scrutiny. Then of course we have the subsequent cover-ups and/or excuses.

Agree RnR

... "not worth the paper it's printed on"

 

Whatever the code be it accreditation or conduct the village manager has the last say if he/she thinks profits will suffer...It's stalag 17 all over again...The contract is a 30 page document which says u own nothing and will pay 2/3 of your ingoing cost plus refurbishments when u leave, which leaves u insufficient funds for another village and a low old age home care. The model in australia is weighted heavily in favour of the owner of the village and until that changes the oldies are going to recognise a rip off in the retirement industry.

Very true froggy

 

 

Why not let them know what you think of it.

We don't live in a village, but if there is no weight behind this for the owner occupiers why have it?

If it is only geared for the Village Owners?

 

 

Contact Information

MAIN LOCATION

Level 6
300 Queen Street
Brisbane QLD 4000

TEL : + 61 7 3225 3000
retirementliving@propertycouncil.com.au

 

 

Nothing is going to stop this code. Even the representative bodies have made submissions for little effect.  In the end it has only one purpose and one purpose only, divert the eyes of the legislator away from the need to legislate.

 

All the more reason to write to your local MP with a copy to the address above Retvilldotnet.

For Celia.

My submission to Property Council, Retirement Living Code of Conduct. 26/07/2018.

Thank you for the opportunity to make a submission re a 'Retirement Living Industry Code of Conduct'.

Although admirable to some within the retirement living industry, an aspirational code of conduct is no substitute for consumer protections under law. If there is to be a code it should only be a short, sharp commitment to operate lawfully, morally and ethically. Only legislation and then regulators ready to enforce that law can truly protect retirees. An industry ombudsman is of the greatest need with fast, affordable, decisive enforcement of that law. Not even a not-for-profit operator has been a guarantee of ethical or lawful behaviour within the retirement living industry.

History has recorded self regulation as a fail and although we may self regulate with the best of intentions, the dark motivation to step over the line of morality and legality comes from a basic human weakness. A weakness to firstly protect or advantage oneself at the cost of another, and secondly in many cases a weakness to protect or advantage the organisation one serves at the cost of many. The aspiration to a retirement living code will last as long as the desire to advantage the resident is in the best interest of an individual operator, when the opposite is true the code will often most assuredly fail. Only the strength of the written law together with a ready and simple path to justice, such as an industry Ombudsman, will see the rights of residents truly protected and where necessary redressed. Anything else is in my personal view simply a mechanism to divert the eyes of the legislator away from the need to legislate.

If the objective of the code is to help elevate the currently held poor community view of the industry, then the industry must join with residents and their representative bodies and drive legislative reforms that truly protect retirees. It is what is actually happening to village residents that is driving down the reputation of the industry. The community not just residents are shocked at the lack of legality and morality in the operations of some, will the code truly drive improved legality and morality amongst operators. Improved legislative protections for residents however will generate greater confidence in the industry, confidence in both those coming baby boomers thinking of moving toward this sector and of course just as importantly their family members. A new found confidence that could propel the Australian industry closer to the penetration levels seen overseas.

Good operators are seeing the retirement living industry trashed by bad operators, of all the times operators and retirees should share a singular desire of a better industry it should be at this point in time. A Retirement Living Industry Code of Conduct may give some industry players a warm and fuzzy feeling, but it makes zero, zero contribution to tangible protections for retirees. The industry, not just residents, should be campaigning for an Ombudsman in every state.

No modern responsible industry should be afraid of the law nor be ready to hide behind any weaknesses in it. If an industry has to write down to remind itself to operate lawfully, morally and ethically then that industry has already failed both their customers and the community generally. To be a respected industry you don't aspire to ideals, you live them.

Thank you,

 L.S.

 

8 comments