• The Days of the Golden Movies 1940 to 1995

    Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    7 September 2020 at 12:37 pm
    7 September 2020 at 12:37 pm

    Top Movie Stars of the 1960s | Ultimate Movie Rankings

  • 7 Members · 76 Posts
  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    7 September 2020 at 12:37 pm
    7 September 2020 at 12:37 pm

    Top Movie Stars of the 1960s | Ultimate Movie Rankings

  • HOLA

    Member
    7 September 2020 at 12:47 pm
    7 September 2020 at 12:47 pm

    Great movies of that era, I had a big crush on Peter O’Toole (and still do) in that movie “Lawrence Of Arabia”.

    • Celia Thread Starter

      Member
      7 September 2020 at 10:19 pm
      7 September 2020 at 10:19 pm

      Hi Hola.

      Yes I enjoy some of his movies, not all of them though!

      I remember watching Lawrence of Arabia, it was in two parts, I do not remember having an interval for a movie before that.    3.48 hrs was the running time of the movie, seemed so long but was absorbed in the history of it.   

      Did you watch ‘Becket’  that was full of history.

      Becket Poster.jpeg

      Also I enjoyed 

      The Lion in Winter (1968) - IMDb

      I learned a lot of history in that production too.

      All about Henry II and his sons, not to mention Katherine who played his queen.

      It’s Christmas 1183, and King Henry II (Peter O’Toole) is planning to announce his successor to the throne. The jockeying for the crown, though, is complex. Henry has three sons and wants his boy Prince John (Nigel Terry) to take over. Henry’s wife, Queen Eleanor (Katharine Hepburn), has other ideas. She believes their son Prince Richard (Anthony Hopkins) should be king. As the family and various schemers gather for the holiday, each tries to make the indecisive king choose their option.

      Poor Eleanor she kept on getting locked up in Henry’s prison!   

      It must have been very cold in those old castles.  However, her sons rallied to her help the best they could!

      Her elder son became King Richard the Lionheart and the younger son the bad prince john of Robin Hoods adventures.

      They don’t make movies like they used to!!

    • Celia Thread Starter

      Member
      7 September 2020 at 10:33 pm
      7 September 2020 at 10:33 pm

      O’Toole at the premiere of Becket with then wife Sian Phillips in 1964.

      Credit: Getty Images

      O’Toole with his children Kate (L) and Lorcan (R) at the Hand and Footprint Ceremony outside Grauman’s Chinese
      Theatre in 2011. Credit: Getty Images
  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    8 September 2020 at 10:36 am
    8 September 2020 at 10:36 am

                                            Pretty Woman (1990) The 80s & 90s Best Movies Podcast Review

    Director Reveals: Iconic Jewelry Box Scene From ‘Pretty Woman’ Was a Practical Joke Intended for the Film’s Gag Reel.

    Did you know that the iconic scene in Pretty Woman where Richard Gere snaps a jewelry box on Julia Roberts’ fingers – was originally staged as a practical joke intended for the film’s gag reel?

    By     Apr 27, 2012 9:32 pm ET|Updated Apr 28, 2012 4:01 pm ET

    Today we reveal an important piece of jewelry trivia from one of the most romantic and memorable scenes in movie history.

    Legendary director Garry Marshall dished to ET’s Nancy O’Dell on Tuesday that the iconic scene in Pretty Woman where Richard Gere snaps a jewelry box on Julia Roberts’ fingers – evoking one of the most spontaneously awkward but endearing laughs ever filmed – was originally staged as a practical joke intended for the film’s gag reel.

    Many critics agree that this was the very moment the world fell in love with Roberts.

    Marshall explained why he and Richard Gere wanted to prank the young actress. According to Marshall, the 23-year-old Roberts would sometimes show up to the set a bit sleepy after a night of partying. “I said, ‘Richard, you gotta wake her up a little, so when she reaches for the box, slam it.’ It was a soft box. I would never hurt her.”

    According to Marshall, it wasn’t until the last moment of editing that they decided to use the scene. “We put it in… and it became like the trademark of the movie,” said Marshall. Pretty Woman launched Roberts’ stellar career and the 1990 romantic comedy went on to gross $463.4 million.

    According to movie trivia sites, the ruby-and-diamond necklace that Roberts wears in the scene and Gere tells her is worth a quarter million dollars, was genuine and actually did cost that much. While filming, an armed security guard hired by the jewelry store that provided the necklace for the film was constantly standing behind the director.

                                                   HD wallpaper: Movie, Pretty Woman, Julia Roberts, Richard Gere | Wallpaper  Flare

  • Celia Thread Starter

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    8 September 2020 at 10:46 am
    8 September 2020 at 10:46 am

                               

                                                            These are starting to look old fashioned!  LOL

    This excellent 1988 film, directed by the legendary Mike Nichols, is as fresh today as it was 30+ years ago. It’s filled with female empowerment, great one-liners, terrific acting and Harrison Ford in a terrific comedy role!

    Melanie Griffith was Oscar nominated for Best Actress – and held her own against a great cast including Ford, Sigourney Weaver, Alec Baldwin and Joan Cusack.

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    8 September 2020 at 11:01 am
    8 September 2020 at 11:01 am

    Pride and Prejudice is set in rural England in the early 19th century, and it follows the Bennet family, which includes five very different sisters. Mrs. Bennet is anxious to see all her daughters married, especially as the modest family estate is to be inherited by William Collins when Mr. Bennet dies. At a ball, the wealthy and newly arrived Charles Bingley takes an immediate interest in the eldest Bennet daughter, the beautiful and shy Jane. The encounter between his friend Darcy and Elizabeth is less cordial. Although Austen shows them intrigued by each other, she reverses the convention of first impressions: pride of rank and fortune and prejudice against the social inferiority of Elizabeth’s family hold Darcy aloof, while Elizabeth is equally fired both by the pride of self-respect and by prejudice against Darcy’s snobbery.

    Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier in Pride and Prejudice

    Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier in Pride and PrejudiceGreer Garson and Laurence Olivier in Pride and Prejudice (1940), directed by Robert Z. Leonard.© 1940 Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Inc.

    The pompous Collins subsequently arrives, hoping to marry one of the Bennet sisters. Elizabeth, however, refuses his offer of marriage, and he instead becomes engaged to her friend Charlotte Lucas. During this time, Elizabeth encounters the charming George Wickham, a military officer. There is a mutual attraction between the two, and he informs her that Darcy has denied him his inheritance.

    After Bingley abruptly departs for London, Elizabeth’s dislike of Darcy increases as she becomes convinced that he is discouraging Bingley’s relationship with Jane. Darcy, however, has grown increasingly fond of Elizabeth, admiring her intelligence and vitality. While visiting the now-married Charlotte, Elizabeth sees Darcy, who professes his love for her and proposes. A surprised Elizabeth refuses his offer, and, when Darcy demands an explanation, she accuses him of breaking up Jane and Bingley. Darcy subsequently writes Elizabeth a letter in which he explains that he separated the couple largely because he did not believe Jane returned Bingley’s affection. He also discloses that Wickham, after squandering his inheritance, tried to marry Darcy’s then 15-year-old sister in an attempt to gain possession of her fortune. With these revelations, Elizabeth begins to see Darcy in a new light.

    Shortly thereafter the youngest Bennet sister, Lydia, elopes with Wickham. The news is met with great alarm by Elizabeth, since the scandalous affair—which is unlikely to end in marriage—could ruin the reputation of the other Bennet sisters. When she tells Darcy, he persuades Wickham to marry Lydia, offering him money. Despite Darcy’s attempt to keep his intervention a secret, Elizabeth learns of his actions. At the encouragement of Darcy, Bingley subsequently returns, and he and Jane become engaged. Finally, Darcy proposes again to Elizabeth, who this time accepts.

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    8 September 2020 at 11:03 am
    8 September 2020 at 11:03 am

    Adaptations – Pride and Prejudice 1995 vs 2005FEBRUARY 5, 201227 COMMENTS

    One thing about Advent with Austen that I was really looking forward to was watching the 1995 Pride and Prejudice TV series. I had never seen it and had heard some marvellous things… especially about Colin Firth as a certain Mr. Darcy. I also decided to re-watch the 2005 film with Keira Knightley and Matthew Macfadyen.

    Within five minutes, I knew that I was going to love the 1995 version of this much loved book. It is immediately clear that the casting for the Bennet family was chosen brilliantly.  It is almost unbearable to watch the high-pitched, shrieking Alison Steadman, who plays the annoying Mrs. Bennet superbly. Benjamin Whitrow is also fantastic as her quiet and sarcastic husband, forever teasing and making fun of her. The irritating daughter, Lydia is played by Julia Sawalha who is excellent and almost, but not quite as irritating as her mother.

    I am slightly disappointed with Jane’s character in this adaptation, Susannah Harker is every bit as calm and collected as in the book, but I simply didn’t feel the same fondness that I felt for her character while reading Pride and Prejudice. In fact, I have to admit that I preferred Rosamund Pike’s Jane in the 2005 film as she had a sense of humour and seemed more realistic.

    Finally, we come to the favourite Bennet sister of all; Elizabeth. Jennifer Ehle doesn’t so much act the part of Elizabeth Bennet, as is Elizabeth Bennet. She is pretty, polite and smiley with the same witty and sharp humour as in the book – without being too rude or obnoxious. I much preferred her to the 2005 version of Elizabeth. To me, Keira Knightley  is much too feisty and rebellious.

    Elizabeth’s meetings with the proud stranger Mr. Darcy are exactly as I imagined. At first, he is obviously cold and unimpressed, but gradually the audience can see him warm to Elizabeth, and eventually to admire her deeply. I can’t imagine a better Mr. Darcy than Colin Firth. He plays the reserved, proud and cold character so believably and manages to contain all of his emotions in his eyes, with glances at Elizabeth Bennet, showing the internal struggle between his head and his heart. Of course, he also managed to make a whole nation of women fall in love with him!

    The 1995 TV series has a lot over the 2005 film, and not just its almost too-good- to-be-true leading couple. With six episodes, all approximately an hour long, there is plenty of time to explore the characters, and show the gradual feelings of Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy change over the episodes. In the film, everything has to be much more fast paced and when you add the exciting music and the sweeping romantic scenes; in the rain, or on a windy hill, the pace of the story and the meaning behind it is completely taken away.

    The 2005 cast is full of excellent actors, but unfortunately, a lot of them simply can’t live up to the actors from 1995. This could be mostly because there is not enough time for character development. Mr and Mrs. Bennet played by Donald Sutherland and Brenda Blethyn are good but nothing compared to the previous adaptation. However, as I have said before, I prefer Jane in this film. Rosamund Pike portrays the kindness and patience of her character well, but seems happier and quick to laugh, which I found easier to relate to. I also liked Jena Malone as a ruder and nastier Lydia. I don’t necessarily prefer this version of Lydia, but it was nice to see her portrayed in a slightly different way.

    Keira Knightley is a great actress but I think that she changes the character of Elizabeth Bennet in this film by putting too much of a feisty attitude into the role – or maybe I’ve seen her one too many times as another Elizabeth in Pirates of the Caribbean. I suppose it may fit in with a modern day take on the book, but as a fan of Pride and Prejudice, I wasn’t happy.

    I was also very disappointed with Matthew Macfadyen as Mr. Darcy. I found his acting wooden and his haircut far too messy and modern! It is a shame that the two leading characters were such a let down – the chemistry between them was simply not there.

    The changes of location for the most important scenes in the 2005 film are also unforgivable in my opinion. I was especially displeased with the proposal scene which took place in the open on a dramatically rainy day rather than in Charlotte’s little cottage. When I compare the two adaptations, Colin Firth and Jennifer Ehle’s scene is perfection and brimming with emotion, while Matthew Macfadyen is very unconvincing as a man desperately in love. Keira Knightley’s Elizabeth has a tantrum, shouting her feelings, rather than speaking her thoughts in a much more effective, calm and emotional voice like Jennifer Ehle.

    One scene change that I didn’t mind so much, was towards the end when Elizabeth and Mr. Darcy finally give in to each other and admit their true feelings. The 1995 adaptation is true to the book; while on a walk during the day, Mr. Darcy demands a final answer from Elizabeth. It is not the most romantic moment, with Elizabeth talking about her changed feelings in a conversational tone. The 2005 film may be a little over the top but it works well and is much more today’s idea of romance; a chance meeting in a misty field as the sun is coming up, less words spoken and more kissing.

    But that’s enough about the leading couple! Now let’s look at some of the other characters. I was glad to find one of the nicest characters, Mr. Bingley was very pleasing in both adaptations. In 1995 he is played by the smiling Crispin Bonham Carter, who is just how I had imagined him to be. The 2005 version of Mr. Bingley is a laughing Simon Woods who also does a brilliant job as a more dipsy character.

    Mr. Bingley’s sister is equally horrid in both the 1995 series and the 2005 film. Anna Chancellor from 1995 is by far my favourite though. Her ability to slip snide comments in the conversation and pull disgusted faces throughout is hilarious. Kelly Reilly is also very good in this role in the 2005 film. She is nasty and mean, but doesn’t have quite the same effect as Anna Chancellor.

    I was dissappointed with the 2005 Mr. Wickham, not because of the actor Rupert Friend, but because his part was a lot more fleeting than Adrian Lukis’ in 1995. Mr Wickham plays such an important role, both in the story and with his scandalous back-story. He is involved with a lot of characters and changes the course of the plot with his many lies and disgraceful deeds and decisions. I was glad we got to see more of him in the 1995 TV series.

    The casting for Mr. Collins was spot on in both adaptations. In 1995, the role was played by David Bamber, a silly and laughable character. Tom Hollander is a more serious version with less smiles, but equally amusing. Mr. Collins is one of the most cringe-worthy characters from all the Jane Austen novels I have read and with both adaptations, I could hardly bear to watch as he embarrassed and offended half the characters!

    The last character, but certainly not the least entertaining is Lady Catherine de Bourgh. Barbara Leigh-Hunt does a convincing job in the 1995 TV series, but I don’t think Judi Dench has ever been bettered in any role. In the 2005 film, Judi Dench is absolutley terrifying and I particularly enjoyed her icy words with Elizabeth towards the end. She is certainly a version of Lady Catherine that I would not wish to mess with!

    So, which adaptation would I recommend? Well, they both have their good points and bad points. In some ways the 2005 film is superior. The higher budget allows for more elegant costumes and dramatically romantic scenes of windswept fields and pouring rain, but nothing can beat the character development and script of the 1995 TV series. The acting in both adaptations was brilliant, but again the 1995 series wins by having the absolute perfect leading couple.

    Click here for more Jane Austen related posts.

  • Celia Thread Starter

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    8 September 2020 at 11:06 am
    8 September 2020 at 11:06 am

    Dear Diary… I can’t believe my boys are 60! Yes, Colin Firth and Hugh Grant both hit the big six-oh this week. So after all those scandals, lovers and millions made, which of them would seduce Bridget Jones today?

    • Hugh Grant and Colin Firth both celebrate their 60th birthdays this week
    • Both Hugh and Colin were leading characters in the Bridget Jones movies 
    • Claudia Connell imagines how Bridget Jones might look on their lives so far 

    One played the charming, womanising rotter Daniel Cleaver; the other, the steadfast but sexy human rights lawyer Mark Darcy. As leading characters in the Bridget Jones movies, they competed for the affections of the heroine and celebrated singleton.

    This week, the actors who played those parts — Hugh Grant and Colin Firth — both celebrate their 60th birthdays making them v.v. middle aged.

    Here, CLAUDIA CONNELL imagines how Bridget Jones might look back on their lives so far . . .

    Colin Firth (left) and Hugh Grant (right) both celebrate their 60th birthdays this week

     

    Colin Firth (left) and Hugh Grant (right) both celebrate their 60th birthdays this week

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    9 September 2020 at 9:59 am
    9 September 2020 at 9:59 am

       These stars lived to be 100 years old –

    //a.msn.com/01/en-au/BB18PnKA?ocid=se2  

    Slide 1 of 26: Some stars have been lucky enough to reach their 100th birthday. Find out which actors, singers, artists, and scientists surpassed 100 years of age and their secrets to achieving such longevity.Leslie Townes “Bob” Hope KBE, KC*SG, KSS was a British-American stand-up comedian, vaudevillian, actor, singer, dancer, athlete, and author.  

    Wikipedia

    Born29 May 1903, 

    Eltham, London, United Kingdom

    Died27 July 2003, Toluca Lake, Los Angeles, California, United States

    ChildrenLinda HopeAnthony J. HopeEleanora HopeWilliam Kelly Francis HopeTV shows:

     The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson

    WifeGrace Louise Troxell (m. 1933–1934), 

    Dolores Hope (m. ?–2003)

    Places livedElthamLondonAge at death100 years 

    Slide 2 of 26: Kirk Douglas died on February 5, 2020, at the age of 103. This Hollywood giant with the legendary dimple appeared in nearly 100 films, including Paths of Glory (1957) and Spartacus (1960). His career progressively declined during the ‘90s, in part due to a serious helicopter accident and a stroke. Despite his popularity, Kirk Douglas only received one honorary Oscar in 1996. According to his son, Michael Douglas, vodka martinis were Kirk's secret to longevity.

    Kirk Douglas died on February 5, 2020, at the age of 103.

    Kirk Douglas was an American actor, producer, director, philanthropist, and writer. After an impoverished childhood with immigrant parents and six sisters, he made his film debut in The Strange Love of Martha Ivers with Barbara Stanwyck. 
     
    Height1.75 m
     
    SpouseAnne Buydens (m. 1954–2020), Diana Douglas (m. 1943–1951)

       

    Slide 3 of 26: Considered the last living film legend since the death of Kirk Douglas, Olivia de Havilland will celebrate her 104th birthday on July 1, 2020. With nearly 60 movies to her credit, de Havilland is best known for her role as Melanie Hamilton in Gone with the Wind (1939). She then won two Oscars for best actress for To Each His Own (1946) and The Heiress (1949). Frustrated by the lack of diversity in her roles, she sued Warner Bros. in the 1940s, effectively changing the face of the profession.

    Olivia de Havilland: 103 years

    Considered the last living film legend since the death of Kirk Douglas, Olivia de Havilland will celebrate her 104th birthday on July 1, 2020.

     With nearly 60 movies to her credit, de Havilland is best known for her role as Melanie Hamilton in Gone with the Wind (1939).

    She then won two Oscars for best actress for To Each His Own (1946) and The Heiress (1949). Frustrated by the lack of diversity in her roles,

    She sued Warner Bros. In the 1940s, effectively changing the face of the profession.

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    10 September 2020 at 12:31 pm
    10 September 2020 at 12:31 pm

    Reminds me of Western Australia when we first arrived from the UK!  LOL

    Ma and Pa Kettle Movies | Ultimate Movie Rankings

    We arrived in a bush down called Manjimup and the houses looked like this out in the bush!  

    The movie came from the USA called Ma and Par Kettle.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ma_and_Pa_Kettle

    Ma and Pa Kettle - Wikipedia  Ma and Pa Kettle's house | Old tv shows, Universal pictures, Old tv

    https://www.pinterest.com.au/bjorgeabraham/ma-and-pa-kettle/

    Ma and Pa Kettle (1949) - IMDb

  • Celia Thread Starter

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    10 September 2020 at 11:07 pm
    10 September 2020 at 11:07 pm

    The 50 Best 1970's Movie Posters | IndieWire

  • Celia Thread Starter

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    10 September 2020 at 11:09 pm
    10 September 2020 at 11:09 pm

    13 Best Sites for Free Vintage Photos and Artworks - Digital Arts

  • Celia Thread Starter

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    10 September 2020 at 11:10 pm
    10 September 2020 at 11:10 pm

    Love Story & Others Lot (Paramount, 1970). Turkish Posters (2) | Lot #51336  | Heritage Auctions

  • Celia Thread Starter

    Member
    10 September 2020 at 11:11 pm
    10 September 2020 at 11:11 pm

    El Dorado (1966) – Stranded Below Nirvana

7 Members · 76 Posts