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  • Today’s Chat, No Set Topic

    Vivity8/7/2007 Thread Starter

    Member
    2 February 2017 at 2:19 pm
    2 February 2017 at 2:19 pm

      

    …………………………………..Something comes into your mind? share it, as everyone is different so all topics have followers 🙂 Happy thoughts, sad thoughts or just reflective thoughts – let’s enjoy chatting without agro or nastiness. Who knows what we might learn from each other……………………………………:) 

    (A combination of Lets Chat and Today in memory of Gerry, Geomac and Seth.) 

    Please keep it general so all can be included not about subjects that can aggravate like Politics or Religion. 

    Today’s Date Sunday 7th May 2017   

    Many thanks to RnR and Toot for making this into such an interesting topic on past events for us all to learn so much. 

  • 42 Members · 23,625 Posts
  • toot2000

    Member
    1 July 2018 at 12:51 pm
    1 July 2018 at 12:51 pm

    George S. Patton’s dog, Willie, mourning his best friend on the day of his death, Dec. 21, 1945.

    • Anonymous

      Member
      1 July 2018 at 12:57 pm
      1 July 2018 at 12:57 pm

      Awww. What a beautiful photo.

  • Anonymous

    Member
    2 July 2018 at 7:41 am
    2 July 2018 at 7:41 am

    2 July – World UFO Day

    More.

  • Anonymous

    Member
    2 July 2018 at 7:46 am
    2 July 2018 at 7:46 am

    1566 – Nostradamus, French astrologer and author dies.

    Michel de Nostredame (14 or 21 December 1503 – 2 July 1566), usually Latinised as Nostradamus, was a French physician and reputed seer, who is best known for his book Les Propheties, a collection of 942 poetic quatrains allegedly predicting future events. The book was first published in 1555 and has rarely been out of print since his death.

    Nostradamus’s family was originally Jewish, but had converted to Catholicism before he was born. He studied at the University of Avignon, but was forced to leave after just over a year when the university closed due to an outbreak of the plague. He worked as an apothecary for several years before entering the University of Montpellier, hoping to earn a doctorate, but was almost immediately expelled after his work as an apothecary, a manual trade forbidden by university statutes, was discovered.

    Nostradamus. Original portrait by his son Cesar.

    He wrote an almanac for 1550 and, as a result of its success, continued writing them for future years as he began working as an astrologer for various wealthy patrons. Catherine de’ Medici became one of his foremost supporters.

    His Les Propheties, published in 1555, relied heavily on historical and literary precedent and initially received mixed reception. He suffered from severe gout towards the end of his life, which eventually developed into edema. He died on 2 July 1566.

    Copy of Garencières’ 1672 English translation of the Prophecies, located in The P.I. Nixon Medical History Library of The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio.

    In the years since the publication of his Les Propheties, Nostradamus has attracted a large number of supporters, who, along with much of the popular press, credit him with having accurately predicted many major world events.

    Most academic sources reject the notion that Nostradamus had any genuine supernatural prophetic abilities and maintain that the associations made between world events and Nostradamus’s quatrains are the result of misinterpretations or mistranslations, sometimes deliberate. These academics argue that Nostradamus’s predictions are characteristically vague, meaning they could be applied to virtually anything, and are useless for determining whether their author had any real prophetic powers.

    Nostradamus supporters have retrospectively claimed that he predicted major world events, including the Great Fire of London, the French Revolution, the rises of Napoleon Bonaparte and Adolf Hitler, the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the September 11 attacks.

    More: NostradamusLes Propheties.

  • Anonymous

    Member
    2 July 2018 at 7:50 am
    2 July 2018 at 7:50 am

    1839 – Twenty miles off the coast of Cuba, 53 rebelling African slaves led by Joseph Cinqué take over the slave ship Amistad.

    La Amistad, Spanish for Friendship, was a 19th-century two-masted schooner, owned by a Spaniard living in Cuba. It became renowned in July 1839 for a slave revolt by Mende captives, who had been enslaved in Sierra Leone, and were being transported from Havana, Cuba to their purchasers’ plantations.

    Contemporary painting of the sailing vessel La Amistad off Culloden Point, Long Island, New York, on 26 August 1839; on the left the USS Washington of the US Navy.

    On or about 2 July 1839, under the leadership of Joseph Cinqué the African captives took control of the ship, killing some of the crew and ordering the survivors to sail the ship to Africa. The Spanish survivors secretly maneuvered the ship north, and La Amistad was captured off the coast of Long Island by the brig USS Washington.

    Joseph Cinqué. Portrait by Nathaniel Jocelyn, 1840. 1840 engraving depicting the Amistad revolt.

    The Mende and La Amistad were interned in Connecticut while federal court proceedings were undertaken for their disposition. The owners of the ship and Spanish government claimed the slaves as property; but the US had banned the African trade and argued that the Mende were legally free.

    Because of issues of ownership and jurisdiction, the case gained international attention. Known as United States v. The Amistad 1841, the case was finally decided by the Supreme Court of the United States in favour of the Mende, restoring their freedom. It became a symbol in the United States in the movement to abolish slavery.

    Cinqué and the other Africans reached their homeland in 1842.

    More: La Amistad. Joseph Cinqué.

  • Anonymous

    Member
    2 July 2018 at 7:53 am
    2 July 2018 at 7:53 am

    1897 – British-Italian engineer Guglielmo Marconi obtains a patent for radio in London.

    Guglielmo Marconi, 1st Marquis of Marconi (1874–1937) was an Italian inventor and electrical engineer known for his pioneering work on long-distance radio transmission and for his development of Marconi’s law and a radio telegraph system. He is often credited as the inventor of radio and he shared the 1909 Nobel Prize in Physics with Karl Ferdinand Braun “in recognition of their contributions to the development of wireless telegraphy”.

    On 13 May 1897, Marconi sent the world’s first ever wireless communication over open sea. The experiment, based in Wales, witnessed a message transversed over the Bristol Channel from Flat Holm Island to Lavernock Point in Penarth, a distance of 6 kilometres. The message read “Are you ready”. On 2 July 1897, Marconi was granted a British patent for his radio.

    British Post Office engineers inspect Marconi’s radio equipment during demonstration on Flat Holm Island, 13 May 1897. The transmitter is at centre, the coherer receiver below it, the pole supporting the wire antenna is visible at top.

    Marconi was also an entrepreneur, businessman, and founder of The Wireless Telegraph & Signal Company in the United Kingdom in 1897 which became the Marconi Company. He succeeded in making an engineering and commercial success of radio by innovating and building on the work of previous experimenters and physicists.

    In 1929, Marconi was ennobled as a Marquis by King Victor Emmanuel III of Italy and, in 1931, he set up the Vatican Radio for Pope Pius XI.

    The role played by Marconi Co. wireless in maritime rescues raised public awareness of the value of radio and brought fame to Marconi, particularly the sinkings of the RMS Titanic on 15 April 1912 and the RMS Lusitania on 7 May 1915.

    More.

  • Anonymous

    Member
    2 July 2018 at 7:56 am
    2 July 2018 at 7:56 am

    1900 – The first Zeppelin flight takes place on Lake Constance near Friedrichshafen, Germany.

    A Zeppelin was a type of rigid airship named after the German Count Ferdinand von Zeppelin who pioneered rigid airship development at the beginning of the 20th century. Zeppelin’s notions were first formulated in 1874 and developed in detail in 1893. They were patented in Germany in 1895 and in the United States in 1899.

    The first flight of LZ 1 over Lake Constance, a lake on the Rhine at the northern foot of the Alps, on 2 July 1900.

    The first Zeppelin flight took place over Lake Constance. Damaged during landing, it was repaired and modified and proved its potential in two subsequent flights made on 17 and 24 October 1900.

    After the outstanding success of the Zeppelin design, the word zeppelin came to be commonly used to refer to all rigid airships. Zeppelins were first flown commercially in 1910 by Deutsche Luftschiffahrts-AG, the world’s first airline in revenue service. By mid-1914, DELAG had carried over 10,000 fare-paying passengers on over 1,500 flights. During World War I the German military made extensive use of Zeppelins as bombers and scouts. Airship raids on Great Britain were approved by the Kaiser on 7 January 1915.

    The defeat of Germany in 1918 temporarily slowed down the airship business. Under the terms of the Treaty of Versailles, airships had to be surrendered and Germany was prohibited from building large airships.

    In 1926 the restrictions on airship construction were lifted and with the aid of donations from the public, work was started on the construction of LZ 127 Graf Zeppelin. This revived the company’s fortunes, and during the 1930s the airships Graf Zeppelin and the larger LZ 129 Hindenburg operated regular transatlantic flights from Germany to North America and Brazil.

    The Hindenburg on fire in 1937.

    The Hindenburg was the largest airship ever built. It had been designed to use non-flammable helium, but the only supplies of the gas were controlled by the United States, who refused to allow its export. So, in what proved to be a fatal decision, the Hindenburg was filled with flammable hydrogen. On 6 May 1937, while landing at the Naval Air Station Lakehurst, New Jersey after a transatlantic flight, the tail of the ship caught fire, and within seconds, the Hindenburg burst into flames, killing 35 of the 97 people on board and one member of the ground crew.

    The Hindenburg disaster, along with political and economic issues, hastened the demise of the Zeppelins.

    More.

  • Anonymous

    Member
    2 July 2018 at 7:58 am
    2 July 2018 at 7:58 am

    1937 – Amelia Earhart and navigator Fred Noonan are last heard from over the Pacific Ocean while attempting to make the first equatorial round-the-world flight.

    Amelia Mary Earhart (1897 – disappeared July 2, 1937) was an American aviation pioneer and author. Earhart was the first female aviator to fly solo across the Atlantic Ocean. She received the U.S. Distinguished Flying Cross for this accomplishment. She set many other records, wrote best-selling books about her flying experiences and was instrumental in the formation of The Ninety-Nines, an organisation for female pilots.

    Amelia Earhart’s Lockheed Electra 10E.

    During an attempt to make a circumnavigational flight of the globe in 1937 in a Purdue-funded Lockheed Model 10 Electra, Earhart disappeared over the central Pacific Ocean near Howland Island. Fascination with her life, career and disappearance continues to this day.

    More.

  • toot2000

    Member
    1 July 2018 at 12:24 pm
    1 July 2018 at 12:24 pm

    Glad they won, well deserved victory for Brown and Hawke.

  • Celia

    Member
    2 July 2018 at 7:46 am
    2 July 2018 at 7:46 am

    Wonderful scenery in thos photos.

  • toot2000

    Member
    1 July 2018 at 12:27 pm
    1 July 2018 at 12:27 pm

    I got all excited for a minute until John Howard overturned it.

  • toot2000

    Member
    1 July 2018 at 12:30 pm
    1 July 2018 at 12:30 pm

    According to Kantar, Telstra holds 39.5 percent of the total Australian mobile market, followed by Optus, at 24.2 percent; Vodafone Australia, at 14.4 percent; Amaysim and Vaya, at 4.7 percent; Virgin Mobile, at 4.4 percent; Aldi Mobile, at 3 percent; and TPG and iiNet, at 2.3 percent.

  • toot2000

    Member
    1 July 2018 at 12:32 pm
    1 July 2018 at 12:32 pm

    Love buying cheap stuff from China

  • Anonymous

    Member
    1 July 2018 at 12:45 pm
    1 July 2018 at 12:45 pm

    Interesting comparison, thanks Toot. As are the price rises.

  • Celia

    Member
    2 July 2018 at 7:50 am
    2 July 2018 at 7:50 am

    Sageman I have looked at the sites in China but have never had the courage to place an order!     Except JJsHouse for evening clothing.   

    I admire their  garden swings, we used to have a large one, but like all things it wore out.   I would love to replace it, but the ones here are so small and delicate!

42 Members · 23,625 Posts