Things that will soon be obsolete

Do you ever drive past old Blockbuster Video stores and think what will be obsolete next?

Things that will soon be obsolete

I always find it amusing when I drive past what used to be Blockbuster Video stores and look at how their logo has been adapted to suit its most current retail resident. A lot of these prime real estate places have been turned into Chemist Warehouses or the like.

When video rental stores were booming, it was hard to imagine a time when they would be non-existent, the same goes for cameras that use film, but here we are and those things are just a distant memory.

It does make you wonder what items will disappear next. Here is our best guess.

Landline telephones
The number of households with a home phone connection has halved over the past two decades. In 2001, over 96 per cent of Australians had a home phone connection. Now, for the first time, people with a home phone connection are in the minority (48.6 per cent). While landline phones are more reliable and a great fallback in an emergency, many people see it as an expense that can be easily cut from their budget.

Pay phones
It stands to reason that if mobile phone use has killed off landline use, it is only a matter of time before pay phones become obsolete. Currently, the law requires the provision and maintenance of pay phones. Telstra makes money out of the billboard space on the back of pay phones but, should that revenue drop significantly, you can expect the company to pressure the government for a change in the law and they will quickly become relics in our cities.

Paper maps
Built-in GPS devices and Google Maps on your smartphone have all but killed off the city directories and paper map-making businesses. I’ll admit that I am still in the minority who likes to look at a large area all at once on a big paper map, but I don’t think I’ll have that luxury for much longer.

Print magazines
YourLifeChoices started life as a magazine, but the publishers saw the writing on the wall early and moved into the online space. More and more publishers have followed suit and traditional magazines continue to follow the pattern. At some point you will no longer be able to buy magazines at a newsagent, although we imagine you will always be able to flick through old copies of previously popular magazines while you are waiting to see your GP, dentist or hairdresser.

CDs
We watched the very near death of vinyl, the obliteration of cassette tapes and the next cab off the rank will undoubtedly be CDs, as streaming services continue to grow in popularity.

DVDs
The same deal applies to watching movies. We have stacks of DVDs below our TV unit at home, but the DVD player isn’t even connected to the TV anymore. as they are simply unused.

What items do you think are bound to become obsolete in the next five years? What has already become obsolete that you still miss?

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    COMMENTS

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    Alan
    24th Sep 2019
    9:59am
    CASH. I see cash all but disappearing in the near future. I have to admit that I always like to have cash in my wallet but I think that's just a throwback from " the old days". I rarely use cash as everything goes on plastic now. I don't even feel a bit embarrassed anymore when I pay for a coffee with plastic.
    Horace Cope
    24th Sep 2019
    11:30am
    Gee, Alan, I hope you're wrong. Time after time we read of people in financial strife and in the majority of cases plastic is to blame. We grew up with cash and when there was none left prior to payday, we stopped spending. Through this we learned how to budget, setting aside the money for essentials such as rent/mortgage, utilities, food and clothing with any left over for entertainment. We don't look back and think that we were disadvantaged, quite the contrary, we had a great time.
    Ted Wards
    24th Sep 2019
    3:34pm
    Hey Horace, cash is being replaced already not only by plastic cards but with encrypted currency like bitcoin. The $100 note is set to disappear soon or is that the $50.00?
    jackie
    24th Sep 2019
    10:19am
    I hang onto my landline because of cheap unlimited internet which is not available to those without landlines.
    casey
    24th Sep 2019
    11:00am
    I keep my landline for the free overseas and landline calls I make, plus no landline fees
    Ted Wards
    24th Sep 2019
    3:35pm
    Umm all calls are free now on mobile phones, you don't get charged for calls, you get charged for data.
    casey
    24th Sep 2019
    4:13pm
    I don't know how that works Ted Wards. I keep the data turned off on my mobile and only use it for calls but I still run out of credit.
    SuziJ
    26th Sep 2019
    10:42am
    Casey, do you have a pre-paid mobile? If you do and you're always running out of credit, then it may be time to talk to a service provider of your choice and transfer to a 'bring your own mobile' plan. They start @ $20 per month, depending on your provider.

    I have one of these plans ($49 per month with Telstra) and it includes all calls, SMS and up to 15Gb of data per month.

    I also have a landline, which is used for local and STD calls. I don't have access to international calls (blocked).

    It's your choice, but if you 'need' to provide items like a phone, electricity or gas bill when you apply for a rental property, or even a loan, then having a bill will be better for these situations. A bill also allows you to keep a track of what you're spending your funds on.
    cat
    24th Sep 2019
    11:16am
    not so sure I agree about DVD's. Streaming is all very well but what about a favourite series or film that you will want to watch again and again? They disappear after a while so having a copy in your dvd drawer is a good thing. keeping them on the computer is wonderful till you have a hard drive problem and same goes for external drive. They can also be wiped by mistake. Last year I bought a very old series called 'Have Gun, Will Travel' and this year it will be the new series ' Lucifer'. Every now and again out comes 'Star Wars', 'Indiana Jones' and 'Stargate' or 'Stargate Atlantis' for re-watching. I for one will still keep DVD's!
    Intellego
    24th Sep 2019
    4:26pm
    Movies can be downloaded digitally using BitTorrent technology and kept as *.aif, *.mkv or *.mp4 files stored on external hard-drives and watched over and over again on 'smart' TVs.
    Farside
    24th Sep 2019
    7:23pm
    I also like to keep DVDs. They are sometimes more complete or different editions than the streamed versions and often better quality than available from our third world broadband service. Not a fan of piracy or the rigmarole to evade the various agencies to access torrent sites.
    AutumnOz
    24th Sep 2019
    11:19am
    When, or if, the NBN is available for us it will be via wireless so our landline will stay. As for mobile phones people have to be within a good reception area for them to work, they do not work here and probably never will as there are not enough towers in rural areas for good reception.
    AussieTuca
    24th Sep 2019
    11:43am
    I have an extensive collections of movies and tv series as well as some DVDs and BluRays. Because a hard disk life, if used frequently, is around 5 years I assume that if not used frequently they will last much longer so I have several HDs containing my collections. When I want to watch something I copy from HD into a portable HD that is connected to my Android box and TV. I believe this one will go to the HDs paradise in a near future but my backup will last till after I am gone.

    Interesting someone mentioned below Stargate Atlantis. I have just started to watch it again for the "n" time...

    The DVDs and BluRays, are rarely used these days. I still have them because of the queality that I enjoy once a while...
    The Bronze Anzac
    24th Sep 2019
    12:22pm
    I believe that CASH, CHEQUE BOOKS, & TRAVELLERS CHEQUES will all disappear very soon.
    SuziJ
    26th Sep 2019
    10:50am
    Cash won't disappear, but cheque books are already on their way out, except for some older people who don't like to use 'fantastic plastic', or are not on the internet.

    There's many pre-paid Visa or Mastercards on the market with foreign currency on them that the traveller's cheques have just about disappeared. There's not many countries around the world that don't accept US$, which is one of the 'main 5' on all these cards.
    Alan
    24th Sep 2019
    12:59pm
    Casey .... Do you mind me asking who are with that gives you free local and overseas calls and doesn't charge any landline fees?
    casey
    24th Sep 2019
    1:27pm
    I am with TPG. Costs me $69-99 per month for internet, includes my landline and free calls within Australia including 1800 nos etc and free overseas calls. My wife makes a lot of calls to her relatives in UK. So it works out a good deal.
    Alan
    24th Sep 2019
    2:21pm
    Thanks for the info Casey. Is your broadband unlimited?
    Ted Wards
    24th Sep 2019
    3:32pm
    Believe or not, according to industry experts, the mobile phone as we know it will disappear in the next 5 years or so. I guess one thing that technology cannot replace is toilet paper and bath towels. I don't even own a TV now, I just watch everything on my laptop including dvds and cds! Gave up ironing a long time ago as well.
    bandy
    24th Sep 2019
    4:06pm
    TW where I live no toilet paper bum guns are the go!!
    Intellego
    24th Sep 2019
    4:22pm
    I will lament the passing of CDs, which can be beautiful artefacts. One must remember that it is not merely a disc, but is accompanied by often detailed and interesting booklets. In 2016, I produced a double CD of a colleague's work which included a 28-page booklet.
    LINDY
    24th Sep 2019
    5:10pm
    Cassettes are coming back again. Cassette players are on sale in the shops again. Lucky I didn't throw all my old cassettes away
    Alan
    24th Sep 2019
    5:21pm
    Hands up if you've ever ruined a cassette whilst playing it in the car.
    Teacher
    25th Sep 2019
    12:23am
    Wot I C obsoleet in nxt 5 yrs is Inglish/Ostralyan spelling. We wil hav a langwaj called Fonetik (Phonetic)- how U sa or here it is how U spel it in the txt on the fon.
    It breaks my heart to think that the up and coming generations will not then be able to communicate with the oldest generation still alive by writing/typing/texting the written English/Australian language. How can we stop this happening?
    Teacher
    25th Sep 2019
    12:23am
    Wot I C obsoleet in nxt 5 yrs is Inglish/Ostralyan spelling. We wil hav a langwaj called Fonetik (Phonetic)- how U sa or here it is how U spel it in the txt on the fon.
    It breaks my heart to think that the up and coming generations will not then be able to communicate with the oldest generation still alive by writing/typing/texting the written English/Australian language. How can we stop this happening?
    Alan
    25th Sep 2019
    9:34am
    I share your pain Teacher. I see spelling mistakes and blatant grammatical errors everywhere nowadays. This includes daily newpapers and newly released books. Standards have dropped and as you say, will continue to fall.
    Justsane
    27th Sep 2019
    7:20pm
    I am a bit of a correct grammar fiend, but I don't blame anyone for spelling mistakes or mistakes in pronunciation, when they are trying to marry up the way a word is spelled with its pronunciation. For example, the word 'hurricane' is often pronounced to rhyme with 'lane', when it should really be pronounced as 'hurrican'. Who would have thought that! No wonder English is so hard to learn for non-English speakers. You would more or less have to learn every word separately. I predict that in the future, people will start to pronounce more words the way they are spelled. That is, 'peOple, not 'peeple', and we will only have our ridiculous spelling to blame.
    Believer
    28th Sep 2019
    3:35pm
    Whilst travelling on a bus, I watched a young person use her tap and go card and that cost her an extra charge of 50 cents !
    The government want everyone to use plastic so they can see how much you are spending on your bank account and worse, when people get a bit extra for doing work for someone and get paid in cash, the government don't know and lose tax!
    Yet the work you have done is cheaper because you offer cash. It may not be completely honest but just how much can the government get if everyone can be checked with plastic!
    Youth do not realize how much they will need the extra money till they have kids.
    There are also times where you just need to have a bit of cash in your pocket.
    notelle
    29th Sep 2019
    1:46pm
    I think writing in long hand and knitting will become obsolete in the near future.


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