Tasmania offers adventure ideas that are anything but ordinary

Tourism Tasmania has launched its Unordinary Adventures program to inspire travellers.

Tasmania offers adventure ideas that are anything but ordinary

As the COVID-19 situation continues to unfold, perhaps the best place in Australia to get away from it all is Tasmania.

The Spirit of Tasmania continues to sail to Tasmania as scheduled and the operators are working with the government and taking precautionary measures to reduce the risk to passengers and staff.

It’s great, because Tasmania accommodates so many different passions perfectly.

Tasmania’s unordinary adventures can be enjoyed anywhere in the world, but these things are best in Tasmania.

Enthusiasts coming to Tasmania for golf, fly fishing or walking will experience their passion like never before. Here’s just a taste of what Tasmania has to offer.

Fly Fishing
As wild trout fisheries become rarer around the world, Tasmania's self-sustaining wild trout stocks in wild places are delivering the thrill of the hunt fly fishers are chasing.

Tasmania's crystal waters bring the trout closer to the angler, making the fish clearly visible, but Tasmania's wild trout elude even the most experienced angler, testing both patience and stealth.

Tasmania has earned a reputation for some of the best sight-fishing in the world with many fly fishers visiting just for this reason.

What makes this unordinary?

  • arguably the purest strain of wild brown trout on earth
  • world-class sight-fishing
  • the genuine and unpretentious characters of Tasmania’s fly-fishing guides.

Golf
Tasmania's golf courses offer dramatic coastal views built on rugged terrain with many not your average manicured course.

Four of the top 10 golf courses, as ranked by Australia's Top 100 Golf Courses in Golf Digest, are in Tasmania.

Cape Wickham is a worthy recipient sitting at No.3. This King Island course presents a rare and dramatic mix of coastal holes that lean gently towards the ocean, with the 11th hole positioned almost in the sea.

Ocean Dunes, also on King Island, overlooks the Great Southern Ocean, with subtle rolling greens in the mould of Scotland's great links courses.

On the main island, Barnbougle Dunes and Lost Farm have wide-open fairways and holes overlooking Bass Strait, winding through coast and dunes, and offering golfers an unforgettable experience and connection to the landscape.

What makes this unordinary?

  • the high number of top-ranked and world-class golf courses that are also accessible to the general public
  • golf courses designed and built around dramatic coastlines with undulating topography
  • the challenging conditions of playing golf in unpredictable Tasmanian weather (which makes it rewarding!).

Walking
Tasmania has long been a mecca for walkers and has received many accolades for its world-renowned walks in the Tasmanian World Heritage Wilderness Area.

Tasmania's ancient landscapes and endemic flora and fauna make Tasmania the ultimate bushwalking destination, earning the state a world-class reputation for bushwalking.

Tasmania has multiple iconic multi-day walks including the Overland Track in Cradle Mountain-Lake St Clair National Park, the Three Capes Walk in south-east Tasmania, and the recently opened wukalina walk in north-east Tasmania.

Tasmania also has a plethora of other short and multi-day walks, which also command national and global significance for their diverse landscapes, from glacial alpine mountains to beaches and coastal environments.

What makes this unordinary?

  • collection of iconic walks, from short walks through to multi-day walks
  • many trails are found within the 1.5 million hectares of Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area
  • close and regular encounters with Tasmania's endemic wildlife.

Have you been to Tasmania recently? What do you think Tasmania does best?

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    COMMENTS

    To make a comment, please register or login
    Janus
    25th Apr 2020
    10:05am
    Good luck with all that.
    Our national parks are not Parks, they are now "recreation zones", where you will be assaulted or injured by helicopters or mountain bikes, and you will be forbidden access to some areas being damaged by campers or private companies (unless you pay!) and anyone's right to object is removed.

    On the way to these "iconic sites" you will dismayed by the devastation caused by logging, by weed infestations, and by roadkill and litter. The accessible areas are becoming small patches of niceness, surrounded by nightmares.

    Don't plan anything on a weekend, or in winter, as shops and accommodation will be shut. Bring your money with you, it is not cheap. Book well ahead as accomodation is limited.

    It is really nice to have tourists visiting, but the local tourism promotions makes it sound like something that it isn't. The Kiwi's tourist industry is vastly superior.
    Mac
    25th Apr 2020
    11:09am
    Janus,

    Totally agree with you. Can't comment on New Zealand as have not been there.

    Tassie's situation will get worse if inappropriate tourism developments like cable cars/restaurants on Mt Wellington, cable cars on Mt Roland, etc are built which threaten to turn it into Disneyland and the proposed planning regulations which will make it easier for vested interests to fast track their proposals go ahead.

    Happily the Launceston City Council rejected Cataract Gorge gondola proposal but are still to reject the proposed massive Fragrance Hotel proposal.

    Accommodation has become very expensive plus limited. Traffic congestion is getting worse. If the logging devastation becomes worse, Tassie will become a shadow of its former glorious scenic self.

    Expat Hobartian.
    Mac
    25th Apr 2020
    11:09am
    Janus,

    Totally agree with you. Can't comment on New Zealand as have not been there.

    Tassie's situation will get worse if inappropriate tourism developments like cable cars/restaurants on Mt Wellington, cable cars on Mt Roland, etc are built which threaten to turn it into Disneyland and the proposed planning regulations which will make it easier for vested interests to fast track their proposals go ahead.

    Happily the Launceston City Council rejected Cataract Gorge gondola proposal but are still to reject the proposed massive Fragrance Hotel proposal.

    Accommodation has become very expensive plus limited. Traffic congestion is getting worse. If the logging devastation becomes worse, Tassie will become a shadow of its former glorious scenic self.

    Expat Hobartian.


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