20th Jul 2016
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15 essential items for your travel survival kit
woman with her head in the boot of her car looking for her travel survival kit

Most of us don’t plan on having a car emergency but vehicle breakdowns always happen when we least expect them. Even if you have roadside assistance, it pays to be prepared in case you find yourself stranded with a long wait before help arrives. This is where planning a car survival kit becomes vital. Here’s what to include:

Personal items:

1. Portable phone charger
In case your phone runs out of juice.

2. First aid kit
This one’s self-explanatory.

3. Food
Canned food keeps forever – just make sure to bring a can opener! Muesli can also go the distance in a tight spot.

4. A 10L drinking water tank
Important for drinking and washing.

5. Torch or headlamp
For working in the dark.

6. Maps
Yes, the paper kind.

7. Blanket and space blanket
In case you have to rough it in your car overnight.

broken down car with its boot open

Car maintenance:

8. Spare tyre and jack
Along with the knowledge of how to change a flat, of course.

9. Gloves and rags
For when things get messy.

10. Duct tape and WD-40
It’s amazing how many ways they can be used.

11. Multipurpose utility tool
A Leatherman tool or Swiss Army Knife are perfect.

12. Fire extinguisher
When you’re tinkering with a broken-down car you just never know!

13. Jumper cables
Dead batteries can happen to anyone.

14. Foam tyre sealant
A quick, temporary fix for a flat tire.

15. Three reflective triangles
In case you breakdown at night and need to be visible on the road.

What else would you include in your car survival kit?

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    COMMENTS

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    pom13
    23rd Jul 2016
    7:08am
    Toilet Paper can sometimes be usefull
    MICK
    23rd Jul 2016
    1:07pm
    Take a copy of the Daily Telegraph. That's about all it is good for.
    Ktpie
    23rd Jul 2016
    8:37am
    Not sure if you need all these for driving around the suburbs! Phoning RACQ much simpler!
    Hawkeye
    7th Mar 2019
    7:09pm
    You might need the Portable Phone Charger before doing that
    Star Trekker
    23rd Jul 2016
    8:42am
    I carry a Heavy Duty Jump Starter. Great for flat battery, lighting and phone charging in one unit.
    Star Trekker
    23rd Jul 2016
    8:47am
    Also a bottle of Motor Oil, coolant (same brand as in radiator), hand cleanser, tissues.
    The pom
    23rd Jul 2016
    8:50am
    It is a good idea to make sure the wheel nuts have not been over-tightened at a service, but have been hand tightened.
    MICK
    23rd Jul 2016
    1:10pm
    Buy a three quarter inch bar, an adaptor to bring sockets down to half inch and a socket which fits the wheel nuts. You'll never have to worry about getting the nuts off again. I have had this for over 40 years and even helped other people who had the issue you mentioned. Hint: always loosen the nuts a bit BEFORE you jack the wheel up!!
    invisible sock
    7th Mar 2019
    10:33am
    You can buy a telescopic extension which gives you enough leverage to move anything.
    Greg
    9th Mar 2019
    5:27pm
    Many years ago I had a wheel nut so tight that I broke the stud (bolt) off - the force when using a hand tool doesn't just push in a circle but also pushes out. Those air wrench tools that the tyre places use are able to place the force in a circular motion so doesn't break the studs.

    At a service or when getting new tyres I always tell them to tighten by hand only.
    keno49
    23rd Jul 2016
    10:37am
    Also in relation to the Tyre inflation cans. It will destroy your wheel rim if left in side the Tyre for longer than a few hours. The Tyre must be removed and all residue from the inflation can completely cleaned out.The content of the can will destroy the wheel rim especially alloy wheel rims. Only use as a total last resort.
    vincent
    23rd Jul 2016
    11:01am
    forget about canned food and 10ltr of water this is a bit over the top. If you are in the outback yes.Multipurpose tool just have a basic toolkit a piece of fencing wire goes a long way. Dump the tyresealant. And a toiletroll always in the glovebox, there isn't always paper in toilets either. And check your oil and water before you go saves a lot of trouble.
    vincent
    23rd Jul 2016
    11:01am
    forget about canned food and 10ltr of water this is a bit over the top. If you are in the outback yes.Multipurpose tool just have a basic toolkit a piece of fencing wire goes a long way. Dump the tyresealant. And a toiletroll always in the glovebox, there isn't always paper in toilets either. And check your oil and water before you go saves a lot of trouble.

    23rd Jul 2016
    12:20pm
    Spare coat hanger, plastic packing strip, screw driver, pliers, large bulldog clips, ground sheet, parking meter change, overalls, plus most of what has already been mentioned.
    keno49
    23rd Jul 2016
    12:29pm
    We apear to be getting to the stage of the amount of garbage that we are supposed to need In the boot of our car. One will need a trailer to carry it all. As previously suggested join the Racv it's a whole lot simpler
    MICK
    23rd Jul 2016
    4:45pm
    Or buy a van. A big one.
    MICK
    23rd Jul 2016
    1:12pm
    Not sure about some of the so called accessories but the one in the picture is quite important. Chuckle, chuckle.
    We have friends who also take their coffee machine with them and I can understand that one.
    Radish
    23rd Jul 2016
    7:54pm
    I have a $9.99 plastic container made for women or men if you are caught in an emergency. It is always in the car. Well remember being caught in a traffic jam which lasted a few hours and vowed and declared I would always have something in the car.

    Also a bottle of water...I always have a first aid kit in glove box and a thermal blanket and towels in the boot in case I come across a car accident...thankfully never have.
    Circum
    7th Mar 2019
    2:19pm
    How do you fit a man or a woman into a $9.99 plastic container?

    I would bring a few bottles of grange to pass the time while you are waiting for help.Then get the wife to drive if you are over .05
    Circum
    7th Mar 2019
    2:19pm
    How do you fit a man or a woman into a $9.99 plastic container?

    I would bring a few bottles of grange to pass the time while you are waiting for help.Then get the wife to drive if you are over .05
    Watto
    24th Jul 2016
    6:24pm
    Take their own coffee machine. Now that's Posh
    Virginia
    24th Jul 2016
    10:24pm
    I also carry a sunhat( the folding type) and an umbrella and a jacket usually rainproof.
    Tissues and water and shopping bags.
    Cosmo
    4th Oct 2018
    10:47am
    Two hi-Vis vests, leather gloves and LED red flashing lights. How many people do we hear of breaking down or stopping to assist and they are wiped out by a passing vehicle. I agree with Mick too, don't rely on the wheel nut wrench supplied with the car, buy a decent length bar and a high quality socket. The nuts may have been 'free' when you left but a bit of heat expansion on the rim can change all that.
    Charlie
    5th Oct 2018
    7:57am
    Changing a flat tyre usually requires some knowledge, also the practical experience of working thru it previously

    These are just some of the pitfalls...

    Stop the car on level ground and put the handbrake on, or the car can roll away when you try to jack it. The hand brake locks only the rear wheels. Put the car in gear, motor off.

    Know where the spare wheel is, it will usually be in the back under all your things or it will be slung up under the back of the car. Put on disposable gloves before you touch anything as it will all be covered with road grime.

    Know where the jack is (often inside the spare wheel) and the points under the car where the jack can be placed.

    Know where the jack handle is. It can perform more than one function. eg lowering spare wheel from storage under car, winding jack, undoing wheel nuts. On a Renault Kangoo the jack is inside the spare wheel under the car and the handle is under the front bonnet.

    Have a special wheel nut socket with a long handle for leverage. Long enough to stand on. The wheel nuts will probably be very tight from the pneumatic socket at the garage.
    Usually the wheel nuts are loosened before jacking the car, to prevent the wheel from turning. To loosen wheel nuts turn them anticlockwise.

    The spare wheel should be checked occasionally to ensure it has the right pressure of air so you are not changing from one flat to another.

    This should get you halfway thru
    Greg
    9th Mar 2019
    5:31pm
    I struggle to get the old punctured tyre back into the car, bloody thing is a 20 inch alloy but HEAVY, trying to life up to the hatch and place inside without scratching the bumper is a massive task for me. Spare is a space saver so that's okay.
    floss
    7th Mar 2019
    3:09pm
    Mick the Daily Telegraph is banned in our house i have no time to read false news from Murdock and his gang.
    pedro the swift
    7th Mar 2019
    4:40pm
    A bottle of scotch to calm your nerves after you had a prang.You need a drink after an accident. Covers the booze you had before too!.
    pedro the swift
    7th Mar 2019
    4:41pm
    As far as a "container" for men and women goes, I recall some one selling "Pith Helmets" a while away just made for such an emergency
    Hawkeye
    7th Mar 2019
    7:33pm
    Pedro, you have a bit of a lisp (lithp) mate.
    Are they to "pith" in?
    Hawkeye
    7th Mar 2019
    7:11pm
    I don't need the Foam Tyre Sealant because I don't have Foam Tyres


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