14th Nov 2013
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First things first
First things first
Image credit: Shutterstock

You've just arrived at your destination, the holiday you have been planning and looking forward to for months is about to begin. What are the top six things you should do in the first 24 hours?

1. Confirm your checkout time. Surprisingly, some hotels have later checkout times. Most travellers assume that they have to be packed and checked out of their rooms by 10 am but a lot of hotels are now offering later checkouts. Who wouldn't want to enjoy a few extra drinks or sightseeing opportunities the night before? Or a bit of a sleep in?

2. Reset your body clock by getting into the rhythm of your destination. If you arrive late at night go straight to bed, or if you find yourself at your destination early in the morning, have a cup of tea and some toast (or whatever you would normally have for breakfast), then take a walk around town. Don't be tempted to keep in sync with your normal routine as you will find yourself behind the eight-ball the whole holiday.

3. Don't be tempted – try to ignore your caffeine addiction. If you arrive at your destination late at night and are dying for a cup of coffee, ignore the temptation. As per above, try to adjust your body clock ASAP. Or simply hold off having your first strong cup of coffee until you wake up on the first morning in your new destination.

4. While taking your stroll around after arriving at your destination, make sure to take a lot of photos while your eye is still fresh.

5. Charge on! Whatever electronics you are carrying with you, whether it be your phone, camera or iPad, as soon as you check into your room plug them into the charger. There is nothing more frustrating than your camera's battery dying just as you arrive at your first photo opportunity.

6. Let your loved ones know that you have arrived safely. Call, email, or send a text message with your accommodation and contact details.

What do you do within the first 24 hours of arriving at your destination? Do you have any useful tips to share? 





    COMMENTS

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    Dancer
    20th Nov 2013
    2:55pm
    Check out emergency routines and exits at the Hotel!!
    NomadOne
    20th Nov 2013
    3:46pm
    Hydrate - drink water and have a shower or bath. Check medication routines and make sure that the time for the next set of doses has been properly calculated, especially when travelling long distance over several time zones. We usually leave one watch on 'home' time for 36 hours to ensure we've caught up properly.
    Mary
    20th Nov 2013
    3:57pm
    very well said - the medication times are so confusing when you have a 14 hour flight good tip with the watches Thanks
    Mary
    20th Nov 2013
    3:56pm
    The first thing I do is check out if there is a Hop on Hop off bus - they have a commentary in several languages and you get to know where all the tourist hot spots are - conveniently located - even if you do not purchase a ticket - the map is invaluable.
    hooha
    20th Nov 2013
    6:05pm
    With the charging more of an issue these days with so many things we are likely to take with us (camera, laptop, phone etc.) it can be made easier. Instead of just multiple power converters take one and an Australian power board. Saves having to do the juggle or find multiple outlets.
    Emby
    20th Nov 2013
    6:51pm
    Boil your jug and let the water cool. Pack an empty water bottle and fill this up and into the fridge. Even if water is safe to drink, don't take the chance. It's easy to reboil each evening and refill your bottle (unless bottled water is very cheap). Was in Vietnam last month, a 500ml bottle of water cost me $4.50 at Darwin Airport, but in Vietnam it was only 28c.
    purleey
    20th Nov 2013
    10:31pm
    The first thing I do when I arrive at the hotel is to pick up a brochure or card with the name of hotel and address. Then if I can't rmember the way back to the hotel I have the information of where I am staying and can ask directions. This is especially important if I am in a country where I do not speak the language.


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