Tips for trauma-free travel

Here are five top travel tips to make your journey as smooth as possible.

Tips for trauma-free travel

Cramming all your belongings in your suitcase is surely the biggest challenge of a holiday, right? Sadly this isn’t always the case. Part of the nature of travel is that there’s a lot that can go wrong. While it’s good to embrace the unexpected, here are five tips to make your journey as smooth as possible.

1. Travel light and know your limits

While this may be boring, I cannot stress this enough. There is nothing worse than arriving at the airport only to be told your luggage is overweight and have to desperately start pulling items out and stuffing them in your carry on, or worse, wearing them.

Avoid this unpleasant and stressful situation by checking your luggage limits well in advance and planning what you’re going to pack. It’s a good idea to remove about a third of what you originally pack in your bag, especially if you’re female. There’s no point packing for every possible situation, as you can always pick up pieces you need while you’re away. Try to pack versatile clothing and only your favourite pieces that you wear often. An outfit for every day may seem like a good idea, but when you’re trying to fit in any purchases at the end of your trip, it probably won’t be!

So, weigh your luggage before you leave the house to avoid unexpected surprises at check-in and make sure to leave a few kilos spare for souvenirs or gifts, even if they are ones you give yourself!


2. Lock your luggage

This may seem obvious but it’s super important nonetheless. Just as you shouldn’t leave your bags unattended, do not leave them unlocked either. Invest in a good Transport Security Administration (TSA) approved lock and make sure your bag is locked from the minute you leave your house to when you safely arrive in your room. And if you can’t lock it? Spend the extra money having it cling-wrapped at the airport. No one wants to lose their belongings, or end up in prison, Schapelle and the boogie-board style.


3. Stay connected

While it may be nice to take a break from technology when you’re lying on the beach, wait until you’ve arrived safely before switching off. You never know what could go wrong at the airport or in transit and it’s highly likely your smartphone will be the one to help you to the rescue. Make sure your phone is fully charged when you leave home and carry your charger with you so your battery doesn’t die.

It’s also a good idea to check out in advance if you’ll need any adaptors where you’re going. Travel chargers will save you a lot of trouble when you get to your accommodation and realise your plug doesn’t match the powerpoint!


4. Keep some time up your sleeve

Whether you’re a punctual person or always running late, allow at least half an hour extra time as a buffer when travelling. Bad traffic, queues and other unexpected obstacles aren’t something you can foresee. Better to arrive early and calmly than end up sprinting through an airport, or worse, missing your plane.


5. Get some sleep

It may be tempting to burn the candle at both ends before you leave, or stay up and binge watch the movies on your flight, but no one wants a cranky companion with whom to travel. If you’re overtired, you’re not going to be as well equipped to handle things should they go wrong. Make sure you get a good night sleep before travelling, and some sleep on the plane, to ensure you arrive at your holiday in the best possible mood. You’re companions will thank you for it as well!

Do you have any other top travel tips to add? 





    COMMENTS

    To make a comment, please register or login
    GregB
    19th Jan 2015
    11:05am
    The small investment in a portable luggage weigher pays for itself mayn times over. Would not travel without one, especially as each flight can have different luggage rules.
    alinejordan
    19th Jan 2015
    1:06pm
    i was hoping to read some advice for travelling/camping in a van, silly me!
    Emby
    19th Jan 2015
    3:24pm
    I use a blank piece of photo paper (much sturdier than paper) and write my flight details and mobile phone no. and insert into the outside pocket of my luggage, in case it gets lost. Your luggage may not have any identification apart from this. Also if you use name and address labels for correspondence, put a few in your purse and if you need to swap addresses, these are a handy way to give out your name and address, without having to scrawl it on a scrap of paper
    Emby
    19th Jan 2015
    3:24pm
    I use a blank piece of photo paper (much sturdier than paper) and write my flight details and mobile phone no. and insert into the outside pocket of my luggage, in case it gets lost. Your luggage may not have any identification apart from this. Also if you use name and address labels for correspondence, put a few in your purse and if you need to swap addresses, these are a handy way to give out your name and address, without having to scrawl it on a scrap of paper
    Emby
    19th Jan 2015
    3:25pm
    I use a blank piece of photo paper (much sturdier than paper) and write my flight details and mobile phone no. and insert into the outside pocket of my luggage, in case it gets lost. Your luggage may not have any identification apart from this. Also if you use name and address labels for correspondence, put a few in your purse and if you need to swap addresses, these are a handy way to give out your name and address, without having to scrawl it on a scrap of paper
    Emby
    19th Jan 2015
    3:25pm
    I use a blank piece of photo paper (much sturdier than paper) and write my flight details and mobile phone no. and insert into the outside pocket of my luggage, in case it gets lost. Your luggage may not have any identification apart from this. Also if you use name and address labels for correspondence, put a few in your purse and if you need to swap addresses, these are a handy way to give out your name and address, without having to scrawl it on a scrap of paper


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